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1

1900 Census: CA: Plumas Cty, Plumas Twnship, p. 49A:
Lowell, Millet, head, born July 1870, age 29, married for 2 years, born in CA, father and mother born in ME;
Ida M., his wife, born June 1879, age 20, married for 2 years, has one child who is living, born in CA, father and mother born in CA:
Ida M., their daughter, born May 1900, single, born in CA, father and mother born in CA. 
LOWELL, Millet Solomon (I642)
 
2

1910 U. S. Federal Census: Kansas: Shawnee: Topeka
Smith, Carnetius L. [sic], head, 32, 2nd marriage, married for 10 years, born in Missouri, father and mother born in Missouri, laborer, sand plant;
Emma R., wife, 31, first marriage, married for 10 years, has had 5 children, all living, born in Missouri, father born in Virginia, mother born in Indiana
Ella, daughter, 8, single, born in Kansas, father and mother born in Missouri
Oscar, son, 6, single, born in Kansas, father and mother born in Missouri
Etta, daughter, 4, single, born in Kansas, father and mother born in Missouri
Ester, daughter, 2, single, born in Kansas, father and mother born in Missouri
Carnetius L., [sic], 6/12, single, born in Kansas, father and mother born in Missouri

1920 U.S. Federal Census: Kansas: Clark: Center:
Smith, Cornelius, L., head, 45, widowed, born in Missouri, father born in Indiana, mother born in Missouri, engineer, light plant;
Ella, daughter, 18, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Oscar M., son, 16, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Etta R., daughter, 14, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Esther, daughter, 12, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Cornelius L., Jr. son, 10, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Rosa B., daughter, 8, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Amelia, daughter, 6, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Amos R., son, 4, single, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;
Harold, son, 2 3/12, born in Kansas, father born in Kansas, mother born in Missouri.

1930 U.S. Federal Census: Kansas, Clark, Ashland:
Smith, C. L., 49, born in Missouri;
Lillie, 31, born in South Dakota, father and mother born in South Dakota, was 16 at the time of her first marriage;
C. L., Jr. 20, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in South Dakota;
Rosabell, 18, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in South Dakota;
Amelia, 16, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in South Dakota;
Amos, 14, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in South Dakota;
Harold, 12, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in South Dakota;
Robert, 11, born in Kansas, father born in Missouri, mother born in Kansas;

1940 U. S. Federal Census: Oregon, Columbia, Clatskanie
Cornelius L. Smith, 66, born in Missouri;
Lillie, wife, 41, born in South Dakota;
Harold Smith, son, 22 single, born in Kansas

Obituary statement on findagrave.com for Cornelius LaFayette Nealy Smith reads: He was the son of Oscar M. Smith and Mary Elizabeth Phegley. He married (1) Emma Rosetta Wilson at Topeka, Kansas, on November 7, 1900; (2) Lillie [d. Marion County, Oregon, October 29, 1963] He was a lumber mill worker."

From The Clatkanie Chief, published Friday, March 9, 1951:
"Former Resident Dies in Astoria Hospital
Cornelius L. Smith, 77 years of age, passed away in Astoria at the hospital Monday Morning.
Mr. Smith for some time lived in Clatskanie at the Mallory wrecking plant and since 1944 had been in Bradwood where he was a shipper operator for the Columbia Hudson Lumber Company.
He was born in Warrensburg, Missouri on December 27, 1873.
His wife, Lillie, survives, as do five daughters and two sons, Mrs. Carl Frederick, West Linn, Ore., Mrs. Earl Hahn, Tuscon, Ariz., Mrs. Esther Townsend, Iola, Kas., Mrs. Artie Hollingsworth, Los Angeles, Mrs. Etta Jeanguenin, Linwood, Kas.; Cornelius L., Independence and Amos L., Wauna, eight grandchildren and two great grandchildren.
Four brothers and two sisters also survive.
Services will be held the latter part of the week with arrangements being made by the Luce Funeral home.
Published Friday, March 9, 1951 in The Clatkanie Chief."

Oregon Death Index:
Cornelius L. Smith
Death Date: 5 Mar 1951
Death Place: Clatsop
Spouse: Lilie
Certificate #2513

Ancestry Family Tree Record:
Cornelius L Nealy Smith
B: 27 Dec 1873 Warrensburg, Johnson, Missouri
D: 05 Mar 1951 Bradwood, Clatsop County, Oregon
Wife: Lillie (Smith)

Another Ancestry Record:
Lists as above with first wife being: Emma Rosetta Wilson (1878-1918) and Children:
Anna Smith, 1900-
Ella E. Smith (1901-1969)
Oscar M. Smith (1903-1934)
Etta Rachel Jane Smith (1905-1998)
Cornelius L. "Neil" Smith (1909-1995)
Rosabelle (Peggy) Smith )1911-1998)
Amelia Otelia "Millie" Smith (1913-1973)
Amos Lindell Smith (1915-2005)
David Harold Smith (1917-1948)
Second wife listed as:
Lillie (1899-1963) who has one child with Cornelius

This "Lillie"'s birth is listed as being about 1899 in North Dakota. Marriage to Cornelius L. "Nealy" Smith is listed as occurring abt 1918. Death is listed as 29 Oct 1963 in Marion, Oregon, USA. 
SMITH, Cornelius LaFayette Nealy (I1766)
 
3

1930 U.S. Federal Census: Illinois: Cook: Chicago:
Hall, Elizabeth, Head, 60, widowed, first married at age 18, born in Wisconsin, father and mother born in the Irish Free State; no occupation;
Fitzgerald, Nellie, sister, 65, widowed, first married at age 25, born in Wisconsin, father and mother born in the Irish Free State; no occupation.

1940 U.S. Federal Census: Illinois: Cook: Chicago
Marshall, Florence, head, 33, divorced, born in Illinois, lived in same place 5 years earlier; waitress;
Conroy, Grace, niece, 21, single, born in Illinois, lived in same place 5 years earlier; typist;
Fitzgerald, Nellie, mother, 74, widowed, born in Wisconsin, lived in same place 5 years earlier; no occupation.

Death Notice: Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) 29 Jan 1944, Sat.
FITZGERALD - Nellie Fitzgerald, beloved wife of the late Patrick, fond mother of Grace Prothroe, Florence Bennett, and the late James and Norine Conroy; grandmother of Grace Lawler. Funeral Tuesday, Feb. 1, 9:30 a.m. from funeral home, 4905 Lincoln Ave., to St. Matthias' Church. Burial Mount Carmel." 
McCARTHY, Nelly (I20875)
 
4

Birth date discrepancies among the various records:
Passenger immigration record lists age as "14" upon arrival in New York City on March 10, 1884, generating an estimated birth year of 1870.
Marriage date of 12 Dec. 1894 at age 25 generates estimated birthyear of 1869.
Obituary lists birthdate as 8 Mar 1877.
1900 U.S. Census lists birthdate as Jan. 1870.
1910 U.S. Census: age of 40 generates estimated birth year of 1870.
1920 U.S. Census: age of 49 generates estimated birthyear of 1871.
1925 Iowa Census: age of 55 generates estimated birthyear of 1870.
1930 U.S. Census: age of 59 generates estimated birthyear of 1871.
Cemetery headstone lists 1871-1948 as birth and death years.

Marriage Record:
Name: Paul F. Mueller
Marriage Date: 12 Dec 1894
Place: Floyd Co., Iowa, United States
Age: 25
Birth Year (Est.) 1869
Groom's place of birth: Germany
Father's Name: Adolph Mueller
Mother's Name: Auguste Bettrich
Spouse's Name: Mary Sippel
Spouse's Age: 24
Spouse's Birth Year: 1870
Spouse's Place of Birth: Germany
Spouse's Father's Name: William Sippel
Spouse's Mother's Name: Bertha Sandmeister

1900 Census: IA: Floyd: Charles, p. 159a:
Mueller, Paul F., head, Jan. 1870, 30, married for 5 years, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came to the U.S. in 1885, naturalized, day laborer;
Mary, wife, Nov. 1870, 29, married for 5 years, has had 3 children, all living, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came to the U.S. in 1881;
Harold, son, Oct. 1896, 3, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Milton, son, Mar. 1898, 2, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Melvin, son, Mar. 1898, 2, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Sippel, Edward, brother-in-law, Feb. 1886, 14, single, at school, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany.

In March 1907, Paul Muller lived in Floyd County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Iowa: Floyd: Charles: 4th wd: p. 119b:
Miller, Paul F., head, 40, first marriage, married for 15 years, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came here in 1883, machinist, gas engin. factory;
Mary A., 39, first marriage, married for 15 years, has had 6 children, all living, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came here in 1883;
Harold, son, 13, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Milton, son, 12, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germmany;
Melvin, son, 12, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Morris, son, 7, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Russell, son, 4, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany;
Willis E., son, 3, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany.

1920 Census: Iowa, Floyd County, Charles City:
Miller, Paul F, age 49, came to the U.S. in 1883, naturalized in 1893, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany;
Martha E., his wife, age 46, born in Illinois, mother and father born in Germany
Morris, their son, age 17, born in Iowa, father born in Germany, mother born in Illinois;
Russell, their son, age 14, born in Iowa, father born in Germany, mother born in Illinois;
Walter, their son, age 13, born in Iowa, father born in Germany, mother born in Illinois;
Gladys, their daughter, age 3, born in Iowa, father born in Germany, mother born in Illinois.

Iowa, State Census Collection, 1925 Floyd Co., Charles City:
Miller, Paul, head, 55, married, owns his property, valued at $4,000, has $2,000 mortgage still owed on the property; no. of years in the U.S. 43, no. of yrs. in Iowa 33;
Miller Elizabeth, wife, 50, married;
Miller, Morris, son, 22, single;
Miller, Willis, son, 18, single;
Miller, Gladys, daughter, 7, single.

1930 Census: IA: Floyd: Charles City, Dist. 5, p. 23:
Miller, Paul F., head, owns, $5000, 59, first married at age 24, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came to the U.S. in 1882, meat cutter, packing plant;
Elizabeth M., wife, 55, first married at age 42, born in IL, father and mother born in Germany;
Morris P., son, 28, divorced, first married at age 23, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany, laborer, rr section;
Gladys E., daughter, 12, single, born in IA, father and mother born in Germany.

From remembrances written by granddaughter-in-law, Nancy Rae Miller, in December 2014:
"Paul F. Miller and Mary Sipple had 6 boys: Harold, oldest, lived in Akron, Ohio, Melvin and Milton were twins. They both went to college at Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They roomed together, one of them got TB and died, 6 months later, the other one died from TB. Age of 19. When their mother died as far as I know, Morris (Maurice) said she died in January 1911, and Morris and Russell and Willis went to the Soldiers Home in Davenport, Iowa, for a time. Maurice would never talk about his stay there, how long he was there, or anything."
"...His Dad [Paul Miller] had a butcher shop at one time on Main Street in Charles City, Iowa. Their house was a couple of blocks south of downtown, up the hill on the right side on a corner lot.
The home that Maurice's parents lived in in Charles City was destroyed in May of 1968 by a tornado that went through Charles City."

Cemetery record indicates death date of "1948" and interrment date of 10/2/1948.

From the Globe-Gazette (Mason City, Iowa) 25 Oct 1948, Mon:
"Paul Miller, 71, Succumbs
Funeral Services Are Not Complete
Paul F. Miller, 71, died at 10:30 p.m. Friday at a hospital, following a long illness. He had made his home with his son, Maurice P. Miller, 1149 2nd. NE.
Mr. Miller was born Jan. 8, 1877 [sic, incorrect], in Germany, and came to the United States with his parents when he was 14 years of age. They settled at Parker, S. Dak. Later he established a residence at Charles City, where he resided continuously until he came to Mason City 22 years ago.
He was employed at the Jacob E. Decker and Sons packing plant until April, 1945. He was a member of the German M. E. church and the Charles City Modern Woodmen of America.
Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Gladys Crosby, Cenralia, Mo.; 4 sons, Harold C. Miller, Canton, Ohio; Maurice P. Miller, Mason City; and R. D. Miller, Riverside, Cal.; and W. E. Miller, Maywood, Cal; 11 grandchildren and 2 sisters, Mrs. Halda Keinie [sic] Humboldt, S. Dak., and Mrs. Viola Collins, Phoenix, Ariz.; 2 brothers Max Miller, Sioux Falls, S.Dak. and Rudolph Miller, Parker, S. Dak.
Funeral arrangements are incomplete. Services will be held in Mason City. Burial will be at Riverside cemetery at Charles City. The McAuley and Son funeral home in charge."

From The Mason City Globe-Gazette (Mason City, Iowa), 26 Oct 1948, Tuesday:
"Paul Miller Rites to Be Held Tuesday at Funeral Chapel
Funeral services for Paul F. Miller, 71, who died Friday, will be held Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at the chapel of the McAuley and Son funeral home, with the Rev. Alvin N. Rogness, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church, officiating. Burial will be at Riverside cemetery, Charles City. The McAuley and Son funeral home in charge."

Funeral Description: Globe-Gazette (Mason City, Iowa) 27 Oct 1948, Wed.:
"Paul Miller Rites Conducted; Burial at Charles City
Services for Paul F. Miller, 71, who died Friday following an illness, were held Tuesday afternoon at the chapel of the McAuley and Son funeral home, with the Rev. Alvin N. Rogness, pastor of Trinity Lutheran church, officiating.
Mrs. Harold Snyder sang "Abide with Me" and "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere". Mrs. Roscoe Patton accompanied.
Attending the services from out of the city were Mrs. Gladys Crosby, Centralia, Mo., and Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Miller, Canton, Ohio.
Pallbearers were Arthur Costello, Clarence Ramsey, Henry Ficken, Robert Logue, Harold Hanson and Edward Kolda. Burial was at Riverside cemetery, Charles City. The McAuley and Son funeral home in charge."

From the Globe-Gazette (Mason City, Iowa) 28 Oct 1948, Thu.
"Attended Services for Paul F. Miller
Attending the services for Paul F. Miller, 71, Tuesday at the chapel of the McAuley and Son funeral home, were Mrs. Gladys Crosby, Centralia, Mo., and Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Miller, Canton, Ohio, Mrs. Hilda Kiene, Humboldt, S. Dak. Artie Kiene, Minneapolis, Mrs. Ella Kiene, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Miller, Parker, S. Dak." 
MILLER, Paul Friedrich (I243)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. VOLSCH, Louis Leander (I1169)
 
6

Massachusetts Vital Records: Marriage:
June 17, Augustus W. Warren, Boston, 21, photographer, born in Rumford, Maine, father and mother: Nathaniel L. and Martha, first marriage.
Eliza Jane Cook, Boston, 17, born in Boston, father and mother: William P. and Elizabeth, first marriage.

At the time of the 1880 census, is living with father and mother in Boston, last name is listed as “Cook” but she is recorded as being married. Her daughter is listed also in this entry, with a last name of “Warren.” 
COOK, Eliza Jane (I3335)
 
7

MISSOULA – Maurice Lee "Morrie" Richardson passed away Friday, July 8, 2016, from complications due to Alzheimer’s disease. Born Aug. 7, 1934, to Maurice and Ruth Boyer Richardson, in Missoula, Morrie loved the freedom of growing up in the rural area of Orchard Homes. He attended Hawthorne School and graduated from Missoula County High School in 1954.

Morrie had many stories working as a fire lookout for the Forest Service, and was very pleased to see that his lookout station is now located at Fort Missoula. He also served in the U.S. Air Force, what he described as some of the best times of his life, starting his enlistment in Louisiana and then being stationed in England.

After discharge from the Air Force, Morrie worked as a carpenter for Jim Roather and other fine contractors of that time. A number of homes built in Missoula were at the skilled hands of Morrie.

In March of 1965 Morrie married the love of his life, Carolynn Ruhle-Ransom, and that deep love never faltered. He quickly adopted her two small daughters, Julie Ann and Janiel Arlene. Within a year they were blessed with another daughter, Kim Lee, and their family was complete. They would be happily married for 51 years.

In 1970 Morrie and Carolynn bought Orchard Homes Grocery from his parents, and enjoyed running the store until 1976 when they moved to Huson and bought the Huson Mercantile. During this time, Morrie also started working for the Frenchtown school system as a custodian, and never had he enjoyed a job more, which lasted until his retirement in 2001. These years of hard work at the stores and at Frenchtown High School produced some of the most endearing memories and finest friends Morrie had ever known. Morrie and Carolynn even took in some students struggling to graduate or having personal problems, encouraging them until then completed school. Morrie was respected by his community, friends and co-workers to the point of complete trust by all that knew him. Such high regard was placed on him that any time his name was brought up a smile, many kind words and often great stories would come forth from all.

Morrie was proud of his work, always giving his very best, and was a quiet, soft-spoken person full of love, who rarely got angry. He was full of compassion for humans and animals alike, with deer, elk, bear, turkeys and other animals knowing his six-mile property was a safe sanctuary.

Morrie stayed connected to his Missoula County High School classmates through reunions and other get-togethers, and was delighted to see Carolynn’s organizing and baking, around the reunions.

The greatest joy of Morrie’s life was his family and extended family, and he took great pride in Carolynn and her talents, his daughters and son-in-law’s, grandchildren and great-grandchildren and all of their many accomplishments. He was known for saying, "We have good people in our family." Some of the happiest times for Morrie was when he was camping on Holland Lake with his family: fishing, picking huckleberries, hiking up to the falls, making a fire and telling stories with the crackle of flames, playing board games and just being with the ones who unconditionally loved him.

Morrie is survived by his wife, Carolynn; his daughters, Julie Meidinger (Scott), Janiel Sanchelli (Robert) and Kim Richardson (Tommy Petersen); and his sister, JoAnn Lowell. He is also survived by nine grandchildren, Renee’ Schull (Jason), Heather Teegarden (Ross Reynolds), Preston Teegarden (LaShawn), Sarah Beatty (Andrew), Anthony Sanchelli (Melissa), Vincent Sanchelli (Stephanie), Shawna Daniels (Michael), Christopher Meidinger Jenkins (Clayton) and Olivia Richardson. Morrie was blessed to have 13 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews, all of whom held a special place in his heart.

Preceding him in death were his parents, Maurice L. Richardson and Ruth Boyer Richardson, and his brother, Donald James Richardson.

The family wishes to thank the nurses and staff at St. Pat’s Hospital, who took such excellent care of Morrie; Bill and Dorothy Wittig, who watched over and cared for his home on the Six Mile; Jeanette Block and Eveline Frame, who gave comfort and encouragement to Carolynn during the difficult times; and lastly to neighbors, friends and even acquaintances in the community who kept an eye out for Morrie on his daily walks or when he was just sitting in his yard enjoying the day. Alzheimer’s took Morrie’s mind slowly, and painfully, but it didn’t take away his joy of a sun-filled day and a smile from a loved one.

A celebration of Morrie’s life will be held on his birthday, Sunday, Aug. 7, at Franklin Park from 1 to 5 p.m.

In lieu of flowers or gifts, the family would suggest memorial donations in Morrie’s name may be sent to the Alzheimer’s Association, ALZ.org or to AniMeals of Missoula, animeals.com.

Condolences may be shared with the family by visiting gardencityfh.com." 
RICHARDSON, Maurice Lee "Morrie" Jr. (I17487)
 
8
1880 U.S. Federal Census: Minnesota: Wright: Clearwater
Oakes, John, 40, farmer, born in Maine, father and mother born in ME;
Martha J., 35, wife, keeping house, born in Illinois, father and mother born in NY;
Myrtle V., 10, daughter, born in MN, fathe forn in ME, mother born in Ill.;
Lucinda J. 6, daughter, born in MN, fathe forn in ME, mother born in Ill.;
Baby, 1/12 April, son, born in MN, fathe forn in ME, mother born in Ill.;
Jane, 76, mother, widowed, boarder, born in Maine, father born in Mass., mother born in Mass.;
Gould, Wealthy A. [sic] 47, sister, widowed, boarder, born in Maine, father and mother born in ME.

Headstone reads:
W. Elmira
Gould
Wife of
J. S. Lowell
Died
July 6, 1883
Age: 50 yrs.
Died in Hope 
OAKES, Wealthy Elmira (I3391)
 
9
1930 U.S. Federal Census
New York, Clinton Co., Plattsburgh
Croake, Margaret, head, owns $7,000, 61, widowed, first married at age 20, born in New York, father and mother born in Irish Free State; no occupation;
Margaurite P., daughter, 37, single, born in Wyoming, father and mother born in New York; supervisor, telephone co.;
Thomas T., son, 28, single, born in New York, father and mother born in New York, lawyer;
Dennis, J. son, 24, single, born in New York, father and mother born in New York, mp pcciàtopm;
Garvey, Mary M. Daughter, 34, married, first married at age 29, born in New York, father and mother born in New York, no occupation;
Thomas T., grandson, 4, single, born in New York, father and mother born in New York,
John J. grandson, 2, single, born in New York, father and mother born in New York
Margeurite, granddaughter, 9/12, single, born in New York, father and mother born in New York.

Obituary: Plattsburgh Press-Republican, February 28, 1945:
"Mrs. Margaret W. Croake, 76, widow of Thomas F. Croake, Sr. died Saturday at her home on North Catherine Street.
Mrs. Croake, need Margaret Starr, was born in Hampton, NY Feb. 15, 1869, a daughter of Dennis J. and Margaret (Mahoney) Starr. She was united in marrieage to Mr. Croake 56 years ago. They resided in Wyoming for a time and later resided in Saranac Lake, coming to Plattsburgh to establish their home in June 1924. Mr. Croake died here the following month.
Mrs. Croake is survived by four sons, Lawrence E. Croake of S. Orange, NJ, Richard P. Croake of Glenridge, NJ, Thomas F. Croake of White Plans and Dennis J. Croake of Takoma Park, MD; two daughters, Miss Marguerite P. Croake of Plattsburg and Mrs. John W. Garvey of Takoma Park, MD; one sister, Mrs. Catherine Starr Brennan of Troy; grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Margaret W. Croake were held from St. John's Church. Burial was in Mount Carmel Cemetery. 
STARR, Margaret W. (I20838)
 
10
From "The Mortimer Family of Wigmore: An outline lineage" by Ian Mortimer, Version 3.0, 16 June 2016:
"Anne Mortimer (1390-1411), who married Richard (d. 1415), earl of Cambridge, and by him had two children.
a. Isabella (1409-1484), who married Henry Bourchier (d. 1483), earl of Essex.
b. Richard (1411-1460), duke of York, earl of March and Ulster, and Lord Mortimer of Wigmore, who took the surname Plantagenet. He married Cecily Neville (1415-1495), and had issue, among others:
i. Anne of York (1439-1476), who married Henry Holland (1430-1475), duke of Exeter, and had issue.
ii. Edward IV (1442-1483), king of England, who married Elizabeth
Woodville and had issue.
iii. Edmund (d. 1460), earl of Rutland.
iv. Elizabeth of York (1444-1503?), who married John de la Pole (1442-1491/2), earl of Suffolk, and had issue.
v. Margaret of York (1446-1503), who married Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy but died without issue.
vi. George (1449-1478), duke of Clarence. He married Isabella Neville and had issue.
vii.Richard III (1452-1485), king of England. He married Anne Neville but their sole son, Edward of Middleham (1473-1484), predeceased his father. Richard also left two illegitimate children, John of Gloucester and Katherine, later countess of Pembroke.

In this way all the Mortimer honours, lands and titles became subsumed in the Crown. This includes the titles and estates of the family of Mortimer of Chelmarsh, which reverted to the duke of York." 
MORTIMER, Anne (I20565)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RANG, Norman Kenneth "Norm" (I1156)
 
12
Possible Birth Transcription:
First Name: Florence R
Last Name: Wilkinson
Birth Year: 1915
Birth Quarter: 3
Mother's last name: Taylor
District Dudley
County: Staffordshire
Country: England
Volume: 6B
Page 1661

Marriage transcription:
John Hingley
Florence R. Wilkinson
Marriage Year: 1941
Marriage Quarter: 1
District: Rowley Regis
County: Staffordshire
Country: England
Volume: 6B
Page: 1893 
WILKINSON, Ruth (I20123)
 
13  STARR, Clementena Ernestine (I280)
 
14  NILSDTR, Anna (I17686)
 
15 'He was a volunteer in Company G, 17th Regiment of Maine Volunteers."

Joshua Jophanus/Josphanus Lowell, was born on Nov. 22, 1843 in Farmington, the son of Joshua and Chloe (Morrison) Lowell. He enlisted from Farmington in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on Aug 18, 1862 and died of disease at Camp Pitcher, VA on Feb. 11, 1863.«s11» 
LOWELL, Joshua Jophanus (I408)
 
16 'Here lyes ye Body of
Mrs. KATHERINE MANTER
Wife to Mr. GEORGE
MANTER Who Died
July 8, 1754 Aged 46
Years 2 Months & 15 Days.' 
ATHEARN, Katherine (I6870)
 
17 ‘IDA LONGESPÉE. She married (1st) Ralph de Somery, of Little Linford and Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, son and heir of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, Staffordshire, by Margaret, daughter of John Fitz Gilbert (or le Marshal). They had no issue. She married (2nd) about Jan. 1220 (date of fine) (as his 2nd wife) WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP, Knt. Baron of Bedford, Bedfordshire, Baron of the Exchequer, Sheriff of cos. Bedford and Bucks., hereditary Grand Almoner at coronation of King Henry III, son and heir of Simon de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, Bedfordshire, by his wife, Isabel. He was born about 1186 (of age in 1206-7). Her maritagium included the manor of Belchamp, Essex. They had three sons, Simon, Knt., William, Knt.t., and John, and four daughters, Joan (nun), Maud, Beatrice, and Ela. He married (1st) before 1207 GUNNOR DE LANVALAY, daughter of William de Lanvalay, by his wife, Hawise. William and Gunnor had one son, John (dead before 1232). He took part in King John’s expedition to Poitou in 1214. He joined the baronial host at Stamford in 1215, and entertained them at Bedford as they marched on London. He was among the baronial leaders excommunicated by name in Dec. 1215. He was taken prisoner at Lincoln by the royal forces in May 1217, but made his peace before the end of the year. In 1244-5 he was with the army in Wales. SIR WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP died shortly after 28 Dec 1260. Claiming to take her dower at her choice, his widow, Ida, raided the manor of Little Crawley, co. Bucks, “pulled down houses, cut down trees, and did other enormous damage,” for which actions she was subsequently fined. She was living in 1266-7, but died testate before 1269-70.” LONGESPÉE, Ida (I11877)
 
18 ‘Infante don ALFONSO de León, son of don FERNANDO II King of León & his first wife Infanta dona Urraca de Portugal (Zamora 15 Aug 1171-Villanueva de Sarría 24 Sep 1230, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral Santiago el Mayor). The Chronicon Conimbricensi records the birth “mense Februario…in die Ascensionis Domini” (presumably an error) in 1171 of “Rex Alfonsus filius Regis Fernandi et Dñæ Orace Reginæ”. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Aldefonsus rex Legionis" as son of "Fernando [frater regis Sanctii]". He succeeded his father in 1188 as don ALFONSO IX King of León and Galicia. He held the first documented Cortes in León in 1188, attended by duly elected representatives of towns as well as nobles and ecclesiasts. The Pope excommunicated him because of his first marriage, between cousins without papal dispensation, and placed León under an interdict until Alfonso agreed to a separation. Another dispute broke out with the church after he married his second wife, also his first cousin, from whom he was also obliged to separate. He succeeded in 1217 as don ALFONSO IX King of Castile, by right of his second wife and son. He successfully campaigned against the Moors, capturing Lazeres, Merida, Elvas, Badajoz and several towns in Extremadura in 1228. The Anales Toledanos record the death in 1230 “en Villanneva de Saria” of “el Rey Don Alfonso de Leon, Padre del Rey D. Fernando”.
m firstly (Guimarães 15 Feb 1191, separated 1195, annulled for consanguinity 1198) his first cousin, Infanta dona TERESA de Portugal, daughter of dom SANCHO I “o Pobledor” King of Portugal & his wife Dulce de Barcelona ([1176]-Lorvano 17/18 Juun 1250, bur Lorvano, Cistercian monastery of Nuestra Señora de la Expectación). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes records the marriage of "Tarasiam", other daughter of "Rex…Sancius", and "Aldefonso Regi Legionensi", specifying that the union was incestuous. Nun at Lorvano 1200. Co-founder of the Dominican convent at Coimbra. Beatified 23 Dec 1705 by Pope Clement XI.
m secondly (Valladolid Dec, before 17, 1197, separated 1204 before 19 Jun) as her second husband, his first cousin, Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla, daughter of don ALFONSO VIII King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England (Jan/Jun 1180-Las Huelgas 8 Nov 1246). The Chronicon de Cardeña records that “Rey D. Alfonso de Leon” married “D. Alfonso…so fija Doña Berenguela”. The Crónica Latina records that “doña Berenguela, hija del rey de Castilla” was married to “el rey de León”, when peace was established being Castile and León following the defeat at the battle of Alarcos, despite being related in the 2nd degree of consanguinity. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricum qui iuvenis obiit et quinque sorores, prima Berengaria…secunda Urraca, tertia regina Francie, quarta Alienor, quinta Constantia monialis" as children of "sorore regis Anglie Richardi…Alienor…soror ex alio patre comitisse Marie Campaniensis", specifying that Berengaria was wife of "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie…Alfunsus" and mother of "Fernandum successorem regis parvi in Castella et Toledo" and recording their marriage was initially permitted by Pope Innocent III despite consanguinity but subsequently prohibited, after which Berengaria became a Cistercian nun at Burgos. Her second marriage, arranged by her father as part of the peace process with León, caused religious fury because of the close relationship of the parties. Pope Innocent III excommumunicated the couple, placed Castile and León under an interdict, and eventually annulled the marriage though agreed that their Children remained legitimate. Infanta Berenguela became a nun at Las Huelgas 1204, after separating from her husband. Regent for her brother Enrique I 1214, she became heiress in her own right to Castile, Toledo and Extremadura on his death but immediately ceded her rights to her son Infante don Fernando. She retired from public life in 1230, after transferring full power to her son. The Chronicon de Cardeña records the death in 1240 of “la Reyna Doña Berenguela, madre del Rey D. Fernando”. The necrology of the Prieuré de Fontaines records the death "31 Oct" of "domina Berengeria, regina Castille et Toleti, soror domine Blanche Francorum regine".
Mistress (1): [1195] ---. The name of the first mistress of King Alfonso IX is not known. She was "of modest antecedents".
Mistress (2): [1195] doña INÉS Íñiguez de Mendoza, daughter of don ÍÑIGO López de Mendoza Señor de Llodio [Governor in Soria and Burgos] & his wife doña María García Salvadórez. The mid-14th Century Nobiliario of don Pedro de Portugal Conde de Barcelós names “doña Inés de Mendoza de Ganza” as mother of “doña Urraca Alonso, la hija del rey don Alonso de Leon”.
Mistress (3): [1206-1210] doña ALDONZA Martínez de Silva, daughter of don MARTÍN Gómez Señor de Silva & his wife doña Urraca Ruiz de Cabrera. Living 1232. She married (after 1210) don DIEGO Froilaz, son of --- (-1246), Governor of Rueda (1219), Mansilla (1224) and Viñayo.
Mistress (4): [1210-1215] doña ESTEFANÍA Pérez, daughter of don PEDRO Arias de Limia [Mayordomo Mayor of King Fernando II of León] & his wife doña Constanza Osorio (-1249 or after). She was given the realengo of Villamayor in 1215, but in 1249 granted it to the monastery of Melón. She married don RODRIGO Suárez, son of don SUERO Díaz, Merino Mayor of Galicia.
Mistress (5): [1215-1220] doña MAURA --- (-bur Salamanca Cathedral). She was "probably of modest origins".
Mistress (6): [1220-1230] doña TERESA Gil de Soverosa, daughter of don GIL Vázquez de Soverosa & his wife doña María Arias Fornelos. Living 1251.
King Alfonso IX & his first wife had three children:
1. Infanta doña SANCHA de León (Autumn 1191-Villabuena before 1243, bur monastery of Villabuena de Carracedo). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "filium…Fernandum et filias Sanciam et Dulcem" as the children of "Aldefonso Regi Legionensi" and his wife Teresa, specifying that Fernando and Sancha were deceased at the time of writing. She became a nun in 1217 at the monastery of Villabuena de Carracedo[568]. Betrothed ([1216]) to her second cousin, ENRIQUE I King of Castile, son of don ALFONSO VIII King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England (Valladolid 14 Apr 1204-Palencia 6 Jun 1217, bur Las Huelgas, Cistercian monastery of Santa María la Real).
2. Infante don FERNANDO de León ([1192/93]-Aug 1214, bur Santiago de Compostela, Cathedral of Santiago el Mayor). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "filium…Fernandum et filias Sanciam et Dulcem" as the children of "Aldefonso Regi Legionensi" and his wife Teresa, specifying that Fernando and Sancha were deceased at the time of writing. The Anales Toledanos record the death “Lunes en Agosto” in 1214 of “el Infant, fillo del Rey de Leon”. Betrothed (1204) to Infanta doña MAFALDA de Castilla, daughter of don ALFONSO VIII “el Noble/él de las Navas” King of Castile & his wife Eleanor of England (1191-Salamanca 1204, bur Salamanca Cathedral).
3. Infanta doña DULCE de León ([1193/94]-monastery of Villabuena de Carracedo 1248, before 8 Jul, bur Zamora). The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "filium…Fernandum et filias Sanciam et Dulcem" as the children of "Aldefonso Regi Legionensi" and his wife Teresa, specifying that Dulce was unmarried at the time of writing[571]. Señora de Valdeorras 1237.
King Alfonso IX & his second wife had five children:
4. Infanta doña LEONOR de León (1198-12 Nov 1202, bur León, monastery of San Isidoro).
5. Infanta doña CONSTANZA de León (1 May 1200-Las Huelgas 7 Sep 1242, bur Las Huelgas). Nun at Las Huelgas [1205].
6. Infante don FERNANDO de Castilla y León (Monte de Valparaíso [30 Jul/5 Aug] 1201-Seville 30 May 1252, bur Seville, Cathedral Santa María). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Henricum qui iuvenis obiit et quinque sorores, primima Berengaria…secunda Urraca, tertia regina Francie, quarta Alienor, quinta Constantia monialis" as children of "sorore regis Anglie Richardi…Alienor…soror ex alio patre comitisse Marie Campaniensis", specifying that Berengaria was wife of "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and mother of "Fernandum successorem regis parvi in Castella et Toledo". He succeeded his maternal uncle in 1217 as don FERNANDO III “el Santo” King of Castile, Toledo and Extremadura.
7. Infante don ALFONSO de León (Autumn 1202-Salamanca 6 Jan 1272, bur Ciudad Real, castle of Calatrava-la-Nueva). The Chronicon de Cardeña names “Infant D. Alfonso…de Molina…hermano del Rey D. Ferrando”. Señor de Soria 1223. Señor de Molina y Mesa 1240.
8. Infanta doña BERENGUELA de Castilla y León (1204-Constantinople 12 Apr 1237, bur Constantinople). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "rex Ierusalem Iohannes" as daughter of "Berengaria" and "regi Legionensi id est regi Galicie" and in a later passage records the marriage of "rex Iohannes Ierosolimitanus" and "filia regis Gallicie, sororem Fernandi de Castella", but in neither place is she named. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records the marrrriage in 1223 of "le roi de Castille…sa sœur Bérengère, nièce de Blanche reine de France" and "Jean roi de Jérusalem". The necrology of Maubuisson records the death "II Id Apr" of "Berengaria imperatrix Constantinopolitane". "Jehan fiuz le roroy Jehan de Jherusalem, bouteillier de France" instituted masses for "nostre pere le roy Jehan de Jherusalem et empereur de Costantinoble…et madame Berangiere sa fame jadis nostre mere" in the church of St Paul, Paris by charter dated Oct 1294. m (Toledo 1224) as his third wife, JEAN de Brienne King of Jerusalem, son of ERARD II Comte de Brienne & Agnès de Nevers ([1170]-Constantinople 23 Mar 1237, bur Constantinople). Elected Emperor of Constantinople 1231.
King Alfonso IX had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
9. don PEDRO Alfonso ([1196]-1226). Gran Maestre of Santiago 1225. m ---. The name of Pedro's wife is not known. Pedro & his wife had one child:
a) don ALFONSO Pérez ([1215]-). He was invested as Señor de Monreal by the Order of Santiago. m (Toledo) doña INÉS Gutiérrez de Paramo, daughter of don GUTIERRE Fernández de Paramo.
Pedro had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
b) [don FERNANDO Pérez ([1225]-20 May 1242, bur Toledo, convent of Santa Fé of the Order of Santiago). He was the "doubtful son" of don Pedro Alfonso according to Szabolcs de Vajay. The author highlights that the epitaph of don Fernando Pérez stresses his royal origin, but suggests that this could also identify a member of the Castro family, descended from the royal house of Navarre, an early version of whose arms appears on the tomb.]
King Alfonso IX had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):
10. doña URRACA Alfonso de León ([1197]-[1242/1258]). The mid-14th Century Nobiliario of don Pedro de Portugal Conde de Barcelós records that “don Lope Diaz” married “doña Urraca Alonso, la hija del rey don Alonso de Leon è de doña Inés de Mendoza de Ganza”. m ([1215, before 25 Dec 1218]) don LOPE Díaz de Haro “Cabeza brava” Señor Soberano de Vizcaya, Señor de Haro, son of don DIEGO López Conde de Haro Señor Soberano de Vizcaya & his first wife doña María Manrique de Lara (1192-18 Oct 1236, bur Nájera, monastery Santa María).
King Alfonso IX had two illegitimate children by Mistress (3):
11. don RODRIGO Alfonso ([1210]-after 1252). Señor de Aliger and Castro del Río. Adelantado Mayor on the border with Andalucía. Governor of Zamora 1249. After the conquest of Seville, he received Castilleja de Talavaca in Andalucía in 1249. m doña INÉS Rodríguez de Cabrera, daughter of don RODRIGO Fernández de Cabrera “el Féo de Valdorna” Señor de Cabrera y Ribera & his wife doña Sancha Ramírez Froilaz. Rodrigo & his wife had two children:
a) doña ALDONZA Rodríguez ([1250]-). Heiress of Aliger. m ([1265]) don ESTEBAN Fernández de Castro, son of --- (-after 1288). Señor de Lemos and Sarría.
b) don JUAN Rodríguez (-young).
12. doña ALDONZA Alfonso de León ([1212]-1266, bur Cistercian monastery of Nuestra Señora de Nogales). m firstly don DIEGO Ramírez Froilaz Señor de Mansilla y Rueda. He was the nephew of his wife's stepfather. m secondly (1230) don PEDRO Ponce Señor del Valle de Aria, son of don PONCE Velas & his wife doña Teresa Rdoruez de Cisneros (-1264, bur Nogales, Chapel San Benito).
King Alfonso IX had one illegitimate child by Mistress (4):
13. don FERNANDO Alfonso ([1211]-young).
King Alfonso IX had one illegitimate child by Mistress (5):
14. don FERNANDO Alfonso ([1215/18]-Salamanca 10 Jan 1278, bur Salamanca Cathedral). Dean of Santiago, Archdean of Salamanca. Known as “El Dean”. Canon of León and Santiago de Compostela. Mistress (1): doña ALDARA López de Ulloa, widow of don GÓMEZ García, daughter of don LOPE Rodríguez de Ulloa & his wife doña Teresa Fernández de Lima. Fernando had one child by Mistress (1):
a) don JUAN Fernández "Cabellos de Oro" (-Salamanca 1303, bur Salamanca Cathedral). Adelantado Mayor de la Frontera [with Andalucía]. Merino Mayor of Galicia. Mayordomo Mayor of King Sancho IV 10 Dec 1288-21 Nov 1292. m firstly doña MARÍA Andrés de Castro, daughter of don ANDRÉS Fernández de Castro & his wife doña Mencía Rodríguez Girón (-1282). m secondly (after 1282) doña JUANA Núñez de Lara Señora de Valdenebro, daughter of don NUÑO Fernández de Lara Señor de Valdenebro & his wife doña Inés Íñiguez de Mendoza (bur Salamanca Cathedral). Juan & his first wife had two children:
i) don JUAN Fernández. Living 10 May 1305.
ii) don ALFONSO Fernández. Living 10 May 1305.
King Alfonso IX had four illegitimate children by Mistress (6):
15. doña SANCHA Alfonso de León (1220-Cozuelos de Ojeda 25 Jul 1270, bur Cozuelos de Ojeda, monastery of Santa Eufemia of the Santiago Order, removed 1608 to Toledo, Convent of Santa Fé of the Santiago Order). There was an unsuccessful attempt to beatify her around the time her remains were removed to Toledo. Maybe m as his first wife, don SIMÓN (né Ximeno) Roíz de los Cameros Señor de los Cameros ([1230]-murdered Trevino 1277). He married secondly as her second husband, doña Beatriz Fadrique, daughter of Infante don Fadrique de Castilla.
16. doña MARÍA Alfonso de León ([1222]-after 1252). m firstly ([1236]) don ÁLVAR Fernández de Lara Señor de Lara, son of don FERNANDO Núñez de Lara Señor de Castrogeriz & his wife doña Mayor González (-1239). Mistress ([1240]) of, her nephewew, Infante don ALFONSO de Castilla, son of don FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile and León & his first wife Elisabeth von Hohenstaufen (Toledo 23 Nov 1221-Seville 4 Apr 1284, bur Seville, Cathedral Santa María) . He succeeded his father in 1252 as don ALFONSO X "el Sabio" King of Castile and León. m secondly ([after 1240]) as his second wife, don SUERO Arias de Valladares “Sarraça”.
17. don MARTIN Alfonso de León ([1225]-1274, bur Salamanca, convent Santa Espiritu of the Santiago Order). Knight of the Order of Santiago. m dona MARIA Mendes de Sousa, daughter of don MENDO González de Sousa & his wife doña Teresa Alfonso Téllez de Meneses Señora de Villa-García (-after 1276, bur Salamanca, convent Santa Espiritu of the Santiago Order).
18. doña URRACA Alfonso de León (1228-after 1252). m firstly as his second wife, don GARCÍA Romeu II Señor de Tormos, Pradilla and El Frago. m secondly (before 1264) as his second wife, don PEDRO Núñez de Guzmán Señor de Guzmán, son of --- (-after 1264). Señor de Gaçullorva near Aznalfarache 1252, which became the nucleus of the estates of Guzmán in Andalucía. Governor of Pernia 1264. No issue.
King Alfonso IX had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
19. m MAYOR Alfonso . m don RODRIGO Gómez de Traba, son of don GÓMEZ Gónzalez de Traba & his second wife doña Miraglia de Urgel. Conde. Tenente de Trastámara, Monteroso, Montenegro y Sarria.”«s87» 
Alfonso IX King of León and Galicia (I14836)
 
19 "About 1852 removed to California, followed mining for several years, then moved on a ranch, where he lived till his death."

1880 Census: CA: Placer Cty: Todds Valley Precinct, p. 35 of 44:
Lowell, Nelson T., age 55, farmer, born in ME, father born in NH, mother born in ME;
Zilpha, age 47, his wife, keeping house, born in VT, father and mother born in VT;
Edgar H., age 21, their son, farming, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in VT;
Flora A., age 13, their daughter, schoolgirl, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in VT;
Charles D., age 11, their son, school boy, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in VT.

OJbituary: The Placer Herald (Rocklin, California) 4 Dec 1897 Sat.
"N. T. Lowell, an old and highly esteemed citizen of Placer County, died at his home near Forest Hill last Monday. He had lived in that section of this county for many years, and he was always regarded as an upright man and good citizen. He was a native of Maine, and 72 years of age. The funeral was held Wednesday and was attended by a large number of sorrowing friends and acquaintances." 
LOWELL, Nelson True (I453)
 
20 "BEATRIX de Genevile . The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Joannam, Matildam et Beatricem" as the children of "Petro de Genyvile" and his wife, adding that the two younger daughters became nuns "apud Acornbury"[502]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannæ, Matildi et Beatrici” as the children of “Petro Genevyle”. DE GENEVILLE, Beatrice (I20492)
 
21 "Came to Abbot in 1838, carpenter and farmer."

1860 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot: p. 389 of 395:
George Rideout, age 39, farmer, real estate: $800, personal property: $400, born in ME;
Miriam E., age 27, born in ME;
Annie J., age 6, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot, p. 7 of 19:
Rideout, George, age 50, farmer, real estate: $1000, personal property: $550, born in ME;
M. Elizabeth, age 40, keeping house, born in ME;
Anna J., age 16, at home, born in ME;
Mary E., age 3, born in ME.

1880 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot, p. 1 of 23:
Rideout, George, age 60, house carpenter, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Elisibath M., age 50, wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Mary L, age 13, daughter, at home, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.«s4» 
RIDEOUT, George (I508)
 
22 "Came with parents to South Dakota in 1884.

"When I went through my father's papers when he passed away, I found the bill for wiring that house at 1201 for electricity. At that time they wired only for electrical lights. $35.00 for wiring that house. There were two switches at 1201 to begin with. One at the door by the stairs that turned the dining room light on and one by the front door when you came into the living room. All of the rest of the lights were pullchain.

"My father had these horses a driving team and a surrey and he was as proud of this surrey and driving team as we would be of our cars. He had all this stuff, harnesses, and elaborate trim.

"In his later years he used to go down to the store and shoot the bull with all these farmers that would come in. It was a country store. In Hank's hardware store he used to carry fenceposts and fencing things. Hank and Danny were the mainstays working there. Finally one day, Hank said to Grandpa Lowell, why don't you go to work for me? Hank wanted to have someone sit inside the store to protect for theft. He was like a security guard. He didn't sell anything. He just sat around there and when everybody was out kept watch over things.

"The first time we went up to northern Minnesota, my dad couldn't get over how small the pine trees were. My dad was born in Wisconsin and worked in the lumber mills until he was fifteen, when he came out here. He told me about the big saw they had there and he was cleaning up and he stood up and the saw cut off his straw hat. He threw it in the river and never went home with it."

"At that time, if you farmed a quarter section (160 acres) that was average. A lot of them had only 80 acres. If you farmed a half a section, you were a big farmer. Well, you see, Grandpa Lowell and my dad farmed Cliff's, which is a quarter section, they farmed Jack's, which is another one, they farmed Flora's which is another one, they farmed ours, which is another one, and then they rented land over there east of them, so they were really really big farmers and they farmed this all with horses. "

"My dad was 31 years old when he was married and that was about par for the course. [regarding marriage age].

After he moved to town, on what is now our farm he kept the hay ground. He and Aunt Minnie's hired hand used to put up hay together and then in the winter months he would haul hay from the country to Sioux Falls. He'd go out in the country one day and the next day take it to the hay market in Sioux Falls and sell it.

John R. Lowell and Freda Volsch were married at the West Wall Lake Lutheran Church. They were married at the same time as Freda’s sister, Anna.

From notes by GRL during an August ____ visit to Sioux Falls: Max Miller's family lived about 5 miles west of John Lowell's farm (Cliff's place) when Hazel Miller was a youngster and before her mother died. George Lowell was born on Cliff's farm in 1901. Sometime between 1901 and 1906 when Jack was born, John Lowell bought the farm across the road (Jack's place). John Lowell sold Cliff's place to someone. That person sold the farm to Max Miller. John R. Lowell moved to the West Sioux neighborhood of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on March 17, 1910. He still kept involved with farming, maintaining some haying activities.

1900 Census for SD: Minnehaha County: Wall Lake Township:
(entry found under Lowell, John)
Lowell, John R, son, April 1869, age 31, single.

1910 Census: SD: Minnehaha Cty: Sioux Falls, 6th wd, p. 147B:
Lowell, John R., head, 41, first marriage, married 9 years, born in WI, father and mother born in ME, own income;
Freda, wife, 32, first marriage, married 9 years, has had 2 children, both living, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came to the U.S. in 1883;
George J., son, 8, born in SD, father born in WI, mother born in Germany;
John F., son, 4, born in SD, father born in WI, mother born in Germany.

1920 Census for Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County:
John R. Lowell, age 50, farmer, but not in the district where census was taken;
Freda M., his wife, 42, immigrated to the U.S. in 1887 and was a naturalized citizen;
George J., his son, 18
John F., his son, 13
Charles E., his son, 9

1930 Census: Minnehaha Cty., Sioux Falls, Dis. 6: 1201 N. Lincoln Ave:
Lowell, John R., head, owns, age 60, married, first married at age 30, born in Wisconsin, father and mother born in Maine; occupation: teamster, odd jobs;
Freda, his wife, age 52, first married at age 23, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, came to the U.S. in 1886;
John F., his son, age 24, single, born in SD, father born in Wisconsin, mother born in Germany, occupation: deliveryman, greenhouse;
Charles E., his son, age 19, born in SD, father born in Wisconsin, mother born in Germany, occupation: laborer, odd jobs.

1940 U.S. Federal Census, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: 1201 N. Lincoln Ave.:
Lowell, John R., head, 71, married, born in Wisconsin, lived in same home five years earlier, laborer, retail hardware;
Freda, wife, 62, married, born in Germany.

Polk’s Sioux Falls (Minnehaha County) City Directory 1950 lists:
“Lowell John R (Freda M) lab h1201 N Lincoln av”

Newspaper Article, The Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 27 Apr 1910, Wed.
"A HARD BATTLE
Local Fire Department Had a Long Run and a Hard Fight Tuesday Afternoon
Shortly after 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon an alarm of fire was telephoned in from West Sioux Falls, and Chief Arndt started the chemical and a force of men to the scene of the fire. It was rumored that the Parsons grocery store was burning, but this proved untrue. When the firemen arrived they found the barn of J. R. Lowell and some hay which surrounded the same in flames.
The firemen realized at once that they would be unable to prevent the fire from spreading with the chemical alone and a telephone call was sent in for the steamer which was gotten on the ground as rapidly as possible. The firemen with the chemical devoted their energies in saving a new granary which was about half filled with grain. In this they were successful, but the fire would certainly have spread to near by buildings had it not been for the arrival of the steamer. The steamer was located at one of the abandoned quarries in which considerable amount of water was found. It required the laying of 1,550 feet of hose to reach the fire. But a stream from this hose pumped by the steamer was finally sufficient to put out the fire.
The loss was confined to the barn and its contents together with considerable hay which had been stacked around the barn.
The loss will be somewhere in the neighborhood of $300. Mr. Lowell is a retired farmer who moved into West Sioux Falls some few months ago from the vicinity of Tea. How the fire started and whether or not there was any insurance could not be learned."

A series of "For Rent" ads appeared in the Sioux Falls Argus Leader in Sept and Oct. 1917 as follows: "FOR RENT-FIVE ROOM COTTAGE Inquire John R. Lowell West Sioux Falls."

A "For Rent" ad appeared in the 31 Aug 1923, Friday edition of the Sioux Falls Argus Leader: "FOR RENT SEPT 1-SEVEN ROOM modern house with garage, at 926 West Ninth. Inquire John R. Lowell. West Soo Falls."

News Article for 50th Wedding Anniversary: Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 08 Dec 1950, Fri.
Photograph with caption as follows:
"Mr. and Mrs. John R. Lowell, 1201 North Lincoln ave., will observe their golden wedding anniversary December 12. To mark the event, their children are holding open houe at their home Sunday, December 10, with hours from 2 until 4:30 in the afternoon and from 7 until 9 o'clock in the evening. No invitations have been issued and all friends and relatives are invited."

South Dakota Death Index:
Name: John R Lowell
Certificate Number: 294899
Death Day: 5
Death Month: Dec
Death Year: 1956
County: Minnehaha

Miller Funeral Home records indicate cause of death as "gastric hemmorrhage--gastric ulcer" and time of death one forty five p.m.; age at time of death-- 87 yrs., 7 mos., and 19 days. Buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Lot 153.

Obituary in Sioux Falls newspaper (Newspaper title and date unknown)—
"Rites Saturday
John R. Lowell, 87, Dies in S.F.
John R. Lowell, 87, Sioux Falls resident for 46 years, died at a local hospital Wednesday afternoon following a brief illness. He resided at 1201 N. Lincoln Ave.
Born in Ostrander, Wis., Oct. 16, 1869, Mr. Lowell moved to Wall Lake Township with his parents in 1884. He came here in 1910. His marriage to Freda Volsch took place at Hartford on Dec. 12, 1900. Mrs. Lowell died in 1953, three years after the Lowells observed their golden wedding anniversary.
Funeral services will be held at the Miller Funeral Home at 2 p.m. Saturday with Dr. F. A. Early officiating, Mrs. C. B. Van Ausdall will be organist, Mrs. Henry Feay, vocalist. George, John, Charles, James and Roger Lowell and Clarence Dahse will be pallbearers. Internment will be in Woodlawn Cemetery.
Survivors are three sons, Charles and George, Sioux Falls, and John, Hartford; six grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren."

From “Minnehaha County Historical and Biographic Sketches, 1988”:
LOWELL, JOHN RUSSELL:
Born: April 16, 1869, Ostrander, Wisconsin
Died: December 4, 1956, Woodlawn Sioux Falls, So. Dak.
Sister, Minnie
Married Dec. 12 1900 West Wall Lake Church to Freda Voelsch. Freda born in Germany town of Hamburg Freda passed away May 1953 Three children George, Oct. 3, 1901 Married Hazel Miller Nov. 27, 1925 they had three children, James, John, and Robert [sic] John Franklin Lowell March 1, 1906 Wall Lake Township married G. Florence Feyder March 5, 1935.
Charles Edward Lowell born Nov. 17, 1910 West Sioux Falls always lived on Lincoln Avenue. Married Gertrude Brockhouse May 5, 1938. They had three children Myra, Cheryl, and Russell.
John Russell Lowell came to So. Dak. 1884. He shipped lumber from Wisconsin to Sioux City, Iowa hauled it to a farm to build their home, by horse and wagon. Farmed until moved to West Sioux March 17, 1910. Hauled rock from West Sioux Quarry to build Paulton building, the Manchester Biscuit Company. Farmed small acreages in West Sioux for feed to care for his livestock. Later he kept a watchful eye for West Sioux Hardware. By Charles Lowell.”, , , ,

John R. Lowell Farm (across the road from John Fairfield Lowell homestead). Later, John Franklin Lowell and wife Florence would live on this farm
Twp 101N 51W Wall Lake Township
Section 36 NW Quarter (buildings located on the SW Quarter of the NW Quarter) 
LOWELL, John Russell (I253)
 
23 "Carpenter. Res. Anoka, MN."

1850 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot: p. 10 of 17:
Samuel D. Leeman, age 32, male, house carpenter, $400, born in ME;
Hannah Leeman, age 26, female, born in ME;
Wallace Leeman, age 6, male, born in ME;
George H. Leeman, age 3, born in ME;
Erastus Leeman, 11/12, born in ME.

1860 Census: MN: Hennepin: Other Townships, Champlin, p. 88:
Samuel Leeman, age 43, married, carpenter, $1000, $250 born in ME;
Mary A., age 32, born in ME;
Wallace, age 16, born in ME;
Eraskus W., age 11, born in ME;
Frederick, age 8, born in MN;
Linnie O, age 6, born in MN;
George H., age 4, born in MN;
Rosina, age 2, born in MN.

1870 Census: MN: Anoka: Town of Anoka: p. 3:
Leeman, Samuel, age 53, carriage maker, born in ME;
Mary A., age 42, keeping house, born in ME;
Erastus, age 20, works at carriage, born in ME;
Fred, age 17, born in MN;
Lizzie, age 15, born in MN:
George, age 13, born in MN;
Rosini, age 11, born in MN;
Martha, age 7, born in MN;
Charlie, age 9, born in MN;
Reuben, age 5, born in MN;
Mariella, age 3, born in MN;
Not named, age 8/12, female, born in MN.

1880 Census: MN: Anoka: Anoka, p. 24 C:
Leeman, Samuel D., age 63, retired wheel wright, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Mary A., age 53, his wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Mattie, age 16, their daughter, at school, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
Ruben, age 13, their son, at school, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
Abbie, age 11, their daughter, at school, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
Isibell, age 9, their daughter, at school, born in MN, father and mother born in ME.«s4» 
LEEMAN, Samuel D. (I515)
 
24 "Carpenter. Res. Anoka, MN."

1860 Census: MN: Hennepin: Champlin Twp: p. 101of 357
Richard Lowell, age 31, farmer, born in Maine;
Sophronia “, age 28, born in Maine;
Isabel F. “, age 4, born in Minnesota;
William O. “, age 1, born in Minnesota.

1880 Census: MN: Anoka: Anoka ED#41, p. 16B:
Lowell, Richard M., age 52, carpenter, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Sophrona M., age 48, his wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Isabel F., age 24, their daughter, keeping house, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
Mary E., age 18, their daughter, born in MN, father and mother born in ME.

1900 Census: MN: Hennepin: Champlin Twp., p. 62:
Lowell, Richard M., head, born Dec. 1828, age 71, married for 46 yrs, carpenter, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Sophronia M., his wife, born Oct 1832, age 67, married for 46 years, has had 3 children, 1 still living, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Sherrard (?), Mary E., their daughter, born Oct. 1862, age 37, married for 3 years, has had 1 child, still living, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
“ , Hugh, their son-in-law, born Sept. 1857, age 42, married for 3 years, log driver, born in Canada, father and mother born in Canada, came in 1878 has been here for 22 years;
Lowell, Raymond M., their grandson, born May 1885, age 15, single, at school, born in MN, father born in WS, mother born in MN.

Biography:
"Richard M. Lowell was born in Abbott, Piscataquis county, Maine, Dec. 2, 1828. He came to Minnesota in 1851, and on the day of his arrival went with a batteau containing provisions from St. Anthony to meet the log drivers on Rum river. He was married Sept. 26, 1853 to Sophronia M. Smith, and the next spring took up his residence upon a farm in what is now the town of Champlin, where he lived eight years. He then moved to Anoka, where he engaged in lumbering and carpenter work until 1897, when he returned to Champlin, where he lived until his death May 9, 1901. Of three children only one daughter, Mary, is still living. For the past twelve years Mrs. Lowell has been engaged in lecturing for Spirtualist organizations in several western states, and her local work for the past four years has been for the Band of Peace, Minneapolis. -History of Anoka County by Albert M. Goodrich-pùblished 1905." 
LOWELL, Richard Maddocks "Dick" (I510)
 
25 "Carriage manufacturer and res. at E. Wilton, Franklin, Maine."

1870 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington: p. 27 of 83:
Lowell, Benjamin F., age 32, carriage maker, real estate valued at $1000, personal property valued at $300, born in ME;
Sarah E., age 30, keeping house, born in ME.

From the Bangor Daily Whig and Courier, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1882:
“SHOT HIMSELF. Benjamin F. Lowell, belonging to Wilton, went to Boston two days ago with his wife, and secured lodging. While Mrs. Lowell was out posting a letter, about 6 o’clock Sunday evening, says the Herald, her husband shot himself in the heart with a revolver, in his room, and died instantly. The deceased was 43 years of age. For a long time, he was a conductor on a South boston horse car, and left that occupation to travel for a carriage manufacturer. While in Maine, lookiing up a trade last summer, he got a sunstroke, and ever since has been ailing. His wife tried every remedy for him, but could not succeed in getting his health restored. Finally they went to Boston to consult physicians. Persons in the house, where the suicide occurred, heard the report of the pistol, but did not realize that it had gone off in the house. About 10 minutes afterward, Mrs. Lowell returned, and some one passing her room found her bending, grief stricken, over the corpse of her husband. Medical Examiner Draper was notified but deemed an inquest unnecessary.” 
LOWELL, Benjamin Franklin (I395)
 
26 "Charles A. Willey: Newspaper Obituary and Death Notice
Sioux City Journal (IA) - Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Deceased Name: Charles A. Willey
SIOUX CITY -- Charles A. Willey, 89, of Sioux City passed away Thursday, Sept. 3, 2009, at Casa de Paz Nursing Home.
Graveside services will be 11 a.m. Wednesday in Memorial Park Cemetery, with military rites conducted by the U.S. Army Reserves. He will be laid to rest by his wife, Mary, who preceded him in death on Sept. 6, 2000. Arrangements are under the direction of Meyer Brothers Colonial Chapel.
Charles was born May 4, 1920, in Spencer, S.D., the son of Chester R. and Nellie E. (Hollestelle) Willey. He moved to Sioux City on May 30, 1936. He proudly served his country during World War II with the U.S. Army. He joined the U.S. Army in September 1942 and served for four years.
He was shipped overseas on Dec. 29, 1943, and saw eight different countries and fought in five main battles. He was decorated with the American, European, African and Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon, a Silver Battle Star, three Overseas Service Bars, a service strip, the Good Conduct Medal and the Purple Heart Medal. He returned home in October 1945. He spent the next 35 years working on the Illinois Central Railroad, retiring in 1980.
He is survived by his stepson, Dr. James Galli and his wife, Janice of Sioux City." 
WILLEY, Charles A. (I19048)
 
27 "Cornet John Buck appears in Scituate before 1650, and may have been the son of James Buck of Hingham. He was the first proprietor of Walnut tree hill, as least the wast part of it, in 1651, and his house was on the west side of that hill. He succeeded the vereran Robert Stetson as 'Cornet of the Troopers,' before Philip's war, in which was he was constantly in service."6«s36» BUCK, Cornet John (I8385)
 
28 "D. age 16 years."«s4» LOWELL, William Oliver (I513)
 
29 "Farmer. Res. Abbot, Piscataquis, Maine."

1850 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot, p. 11 of 17:
Nathan Clark, age 35, farmer;
Martha J. Clark, age 25;
Mary Ann Clark, age 4/12.

1860 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot, p. 375 of 395:
Nathan Clark, age 45, farmer, $700, $375, born in ME;
Martha, age 34, born in ME;
Mary A., age 10, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot:
Clark, Nathan, 56, farmer, $1200, $650, born in ME;
Martha J., 45, keeping house, born in ME.

1880 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot, p. 86D:
Clark, Nathan S., age 66, retired farmer;
Martha J., 55, his wife;
plus 5 boarders.«s4» 
CLARK, Nathan S. (I517)
 
30 "Forester of Ludgershall."

“PIERS de Lutegareshale [Ludgershall], son of --- (-Winchester 11--, bur 8 May 1198 Winchester, Church of St Swithin). He became a monk at Winchester before he died.
m as her first husband, MAUD, daughter of ---. She married secondly Hugh de Bocland of Buckland (-1175).
Piers & his wife had two children.” 
Piers de Lutegareshale (I14191)
 
31 "Francis was especially active in the civic affairs of the colony; in 1686 he was appointed to treat with Scituate, Mass. about the division of a tract of land in dispute with Duxbury, was a deputy to the General Court at Plymouth in 1686, 1694, 1701, 1703, was Selectman of Duxbury in 1685-96, was Constable in 1689, was commissioned an ensign 10-2-1689. He built and had gained sufficient wealth to rank as 'Gentleman.'"125

Francis "was one of the Selectmen of Dux. 1685, and 1686, Capt. of a military company, etc. Later in life he removed to Pem. where in the conveyances of real est. he is called 'Gentleman.'38

Francis lived in that part of Duxbury that is now Pembroke. It is claimed that he built and operated the first iron furnace in America in 1702 on Furnace Pond. Lieut. Francis Barker retired from active business in 1713 and gave his estate to his surviving children. To his daughter Ruth he gave a house in Pembroke.7

On 5 Jan 1674/5 Francis married Mary Lincoln (6287) , daughter of Thomas "husbandman" Lincoln (1701) (22 Dec 1622-16 Aug 1692) & Margaret Langer (1692) (ca 1620-5 Mar 1693/4), at Duxbury, MA.232 Born on 10 Feb 1647/8 at Hingham, MA.38 Baptized on 23 Apr 1648 at Hingham, MA.38”«s36» 
BARKER, Lieutenant Francis (I6543)
 
32 "GAUTHIER de Joinville ([1255/65]-killed in battle la Bassée, near Wendin, Flanders [late 1303]). "Geoffroy seigner de Vaucouleurs" divided his territories with “Gautier son fils aîné”, with the consent of “Mahaut sa femme et de ses autres enfants...Simon, Nicolas, Pierre, Guillaume et Jeanne comtesse de Salmes”, by charter dated 129. Seigneur de Vaucouleurs. “Gautiers de Joinville sires de Vauquelour et...Isabiaus de Cereix dame de Vauquelour sa feme” confirmed the grant of freedoms to Vaucouleurs made by “nostre...père...signour Joffroy de Joinville premier signour de Vauquelour” by charter dated Sep 1298. An anonymous chronicle of Flanders records that “sire Liebaut de Baufremont, sire Hubert de Beaujeu et le sire de Vaucoulour” left Tournay to attack “l’église de le Bassée”, and that the “seigneur de Vaucouleur et de Wendin” was killed, dated to [late 1303] from the context[506]. m ISABELLE de Cirey, daughter of --- (-after 26 Aug 1326). “Gautiers de Joinville sires de Vauquelour et...Isabiaus de Cereix dame de Vauquelour sa feme” confirmed the grant of freedoms to Vaucouleurs made by “nostre...père...signour Joffroy de Joinville premier signour de Vauquelour” by charter dated Sep 1298. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not been identified. "Héluis, femme de Gérard de Prégny" acknowledged that she was “femme de corps d’Isabeau de Cirey dame de Vaucouleurs et d’Aulnay-le-Châtel” by charter dated 26 Aug 1326. Gauthier & his wife had [three] children." DE JOINVILLE, Gauthier (I20533)
 
33 "George E. Lowell, eldest son of Timothy B. Lowell, is a resident of West Farmington."

1880 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, taken June 4, 1880:
Lowell, George E., age 32, clerk in store, born in Maine;
Clara M., age 23, his wife, keeping house, born in Maine;
Infant daughter, age 8/12, born in Maine [note: incorrect, this is male child George S.]
Lowell, Herbert H., age 38, brother, merchant, born in Maine.

1900 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington: pg. 76:
Lowell, George E., head, born Apr 1848, age 52, married 21 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, farmer;
Clara M., his wife, born Jun 1857, age 43, married for 21 years, has had two children, both living, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
George S., their son, born Mar 1880, age 20, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Eddie B., their son, born Aug 1886, age 13, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
plus three boarders and a servant.«s11» 
LOWELL, George Edward (I442)
 
34 "George Leubecher arrived in the United States in 1880 from Germany with three German dollars and a few articles of clothing. It took three years working first on a farm near Pittsburgh, then in the coal mines, to earn and save enough money to send for his wife, Augusta and three daughters, Ida, Bertha, and Kate, from Germany. It took another eight months in Pittsburgh to save enough for the family to move to Sioux Falls in Dakota Territory. Unable to find housing, the family took up residence in a leaky roofed carpenter's shop where they moved the bed almost nightly in order to keep dry. Soon they were able to buy a one-room shanty for 12 dollars near what is now Morrell Meat Packing Plant. It was here that Helen (Gussie), and the only son, Herman, were born. For the sum of $1600 George and Augusta bought 80 acres from the Whipple homestead in Lincoln County (in the southeast quarter of Section 7 and northeast quarter of Section 18) Springdale Township in 1889, and moved here with their five children. The land has been in the Leubecher family continuously since that time (homesite in Section 7).

"Here they did extensive market gardening and peddled vegetables, meat, eggs, butter, sauerkraut, horseradish, and anything else they might have. Augusta called on hotels, restaurants, and also homes.

"George and Augusta were devout Lutherans and belonged to the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church in Sioux Falls.

"Their five children were as follows-- Ida (Mrs. Max Miller); Kate (Mrs. Will Buswell), Toppenish, Wa.; Helen or Gussie (Mrs. Norman Bates), and after his death married Hansell Thompson, Stanwood, Wa.; Bertha (Mrs. John Hommes), Oklahoma City; and Herman who married Iva Peterson and remained on the "home place" as a farmer. Ida, who was living in Springdale Township at the time of her death, was killed by lightning at the age of 38."

"My grandfather Leubecher was a traveling musician. They say he was a Bavarian gypsy. Grandpa Leubecher had been married before. He had a son. I don't know what happened to his first wife. The son came over to America after he was grown up. He worked in the Lick Observatory in California. He was a photographer. He was a half brother. He was adopted by somebody else and he went by that name. He never married because when he passed away his belongings had been sent to Grandpa Leubecher and that was where all these pictures were. His inheritance was divided between his half brothers and sisters, which my Mother was one. What was her share was divided up between us three. We got $35. We bought our first vacuum sweeper shortly after we were married with that. "

Naturalization Records (1st papers) Declaration of Intention:
United States of America, Territory of Dakota, Minnehaha County:
Before me the undersigned, Clerk of the District Court in and for said County, personally appeared Georg Leubecher a native of Prussia and makes solemn oath that it is bona fide his intention to become a CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES and to renounce and abjure forever all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign power, prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty whatsoever, and particularly allegiance to Wilhelm, Emperor of Germany of whom he was heretofore a subject, and that he will support the constitution and government of the United States. [signed] Georg Leubecher] sworn and subscribed to me this 25th day of November 1885. Cyrus Walts, Clerk of the District C ourt.

1900 Census for South Dakota, Lincoln County, Springkdale Township lists:
Leubecher, George; head, born Nov. 1836, 69 yrs. old, married for 27 years, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, arrived in the U.S. in 1880, had been in the :U.S. for 20 years, occupation farmer, can read, write, and speak English; owned his farm
Augusta, his wife, born June 1849, 50 years old, had given birth to 5 children, all living; born in Germany, mother and father born in Germany, arrived in the U.S. in 1883, had been in the U.S. for 17 years, could read, write, and speak English
Kate, their daughter, born in Dec. 1877, age 22, born in Germany, mother and father born in Germany, could read, write, and speak English
Herman, their son, born in July 1884, age 14, born in South Dakota, mother and father born in Germany, could read, write, and speak English, attended school
Augusta, their daughter, born Jan. 1889, age 11, born in South Dakota, mother and father born in Germany, could read, write, and speak English, attended school.

1905 South Dakota Census card: Geo Leubecher, Lincoln Cty, Springdale Twp, age 68, farmer, born in Germany, years in SD: 21, in US: 24; father and mother born in Germany.

News Article: Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota), 15 Dec 1905, Fri.
"The jury which tried the right of way cases of the South Dakota Central Railroad company vs. Ruvald and Lubecker came in this afternoon with verdicts in favor of the defendants as follows: For Ruvald they found in the sum of $2,115, and for Lubecker for $200…"

News Article: Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 28 Aug 1906, Tue.:
"During market day last Saturday, George Lubecker, who was on the market, discovered a pair of new shoes in his wagon. Knowing that he was not the rightful owner, Mr. Lubecker turned the shoes over to Chief of Police Wade, who has them in charge, waiting the righful [sic] owner. It is believed that the shoes were stolen and that the thief, thinking he was being watched dumped his plunder in Mr. Lubecker's wagon and did not have an opportunity to recover them before they were discovered by Mr. Lubecker."

1910 Census: SD: Lincoln: Springdale, p. 65a:
Lubecker, George, head, 73, second marriage, married for 39 years, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, farm, general farm;
Augusta L., wife, 61, first marriage, married for 39 years, has had 7 children, 4 still living, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, housekeeper, house;
Kate A., daughter, 29, single, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, bookbinder, printing office;
Herman S., son, 25, single, born in SD, father and mother born in Germany, farm, general farm;
Augusta E., daughter, 20, single, born in SD, father and mother born in Germany, bookkeeper, bank;
Miller, Clifford, boarder, 7, single, born in SD, father and mother born in Germany;
Miller, Hazel, boarder, 5, single, born in SD, father and mother born in Germany.

From the Sioux Falls Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 29 Jul 1916, Sat:
"Real estate transfers from July 22 to July 28, 1916: çGeo. Leubecker to H. G. Leubecker, NW 1-4 NW 1-4, 17-100-49, $2,400."

1920 Census: South Dakota, Minnehaha County, Sioux Falls, ED 203:
Lubecker, George, head, owns his home, age 83, came to the U.S. in 1880, naturalized in 1880, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany, occupation: farmer, general farm;
Augusta, his wife, age 70, came to the U.S. in 1883, naturalized in 1884, born in Germany, father and mother born in Germany.
Kruse, Wilhelm, boarder, 72, single, immigrated to the U.S. in 1872, naturalized in 1884, born Germany, father and mother born in Germany, farm laborer.

Per Rex Leubecher in a letter received on October 25, 2001: George Leubecher came to New York on June 12, 1880. He spent 2 1/2 years in Pennsylvania working to earn enough money to bring his wife, Augusta, and three daughters Ida, Bertha, Kate, another 6 months in the mines to raise enough money to come to Dakota Territory.”

Per birth records of Bertha and Kate, name was spelled “Georg”. His profession was listed as landlord and economist.

There is listed in “Germans to America, 1875-1888” the following entry:
G. Lubecher
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Occupation Code: Farmer
Country: Germany
Last Residence: Unknown
Final Destination: USA
Pot of Embarkation: London
Manifest ID Number: 60390
Ship’s Name: Alsatia
Date of Arrival: Jun 10, 1880
[Ship’s Passenger List confirms above information.]

New York, Passenger Lists:
Name: G Lubecher
Arrival Date: 10 Jun 1880
Birth Date: abt 1839
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Ethnicity/Nationality: German
Place of Origin: Germany
Port of Departure: London, England
Destination: United States of America
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Ship Name: Alsatia

Property held in Turner County, reflected in both the 1893 and 1911 Turner County Map, Home Township:
Geo Leubecher
SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 8 (Lot 1 of Section 8) and the S 1/2 of the NW Q of Section 9 (Lots 3& $ of Section 9)

Sioux Falls Press, March 11, 1921:
“Deaths and Funerals”
George Leubecker
“George Leubecher, 84 years old, a resident of Sioux Falls for the past 40 years, passed away at a local hospital yesterday morning at 7:30 o’clock after a lingering illness.
He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Miss Gussie Leubecher of this city, Mrs. John Hommes of Oklahoma City, and Mrs. W. J. Bussell [sic] of Toppenish, Wash., and a son, Herman Leubecher who lives on the old homestead, seven miles southeast of town. Mr. and Mrs. Russell [sic] are in the city.
The funeral of George Leubecher, 1005 Center Avenue, wil be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the German Lutheran Church, with Rev. Frior officiating.
Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Buswell, of Toppehnish, Wash., are in the city for the funeral, and Mrs. John Hommes, of Oklahoma City, Okla., another sister, will arrive Saturday morning.”

Death Certificate:
Place of Death: County of Yankton
Township of Utica
Yankton State Hospital
Full Name: George Luebecker
Sex: Male
Date of Birth: (no month indicated, no day indicated) Year=1836
Married
Birthplace: Germany
Name of Father & Mother: Unknown
Birthplace of Father & Mother: Unknown
Occupation: Retired
Informant: M. L. Staffler
Yankton, SD
Date of Death: Mar. 10, 1921
“I hereby certify, that I attended deceased from Mar. 5, 1921 to Mar. 10, 1921 and that death occurred on the date stated above, at 7:30 a.m. The cause of death was as follows: Exhaustion of Senile Dementia
Duration: 1 1/2 Yrs.
(Signed) M. L. Staffler, M.D. 3/10/1921 Yankton, S.D.
Former or Usual Residence: Sioux Falls, SD
How Long at Place of Death: 5 days
Place of Burial: Sioux Falls

Current administrative structure for the municipality of Tann:
Name of Municipality: Tann
Gem.Schl. (Key): 06631023
PLZ (Zip Code): 36142
Bundesland (Land/State): Hessen
Regierungsbezirk (Region/AdmDist): Kassel
KFZ (LicPl): FD
Landdkreis (County): Fulda,

George Leubecher Homestead
100N 49W Springdale Twp, Lincoln County
Section 7 SE Quarter of the SE Quarter 
LEUBECHER, George (I247)
 
35 "Grad. by Colby University, Waterville, Kennebec, Maine., Dec. 16, 1841"

"A Baptist clergyman, contributor to our ablest magazines and author of 'Counter Currents.'"

"The title of D.D. was conferred upon him in 1870."

Williams, Nathaniel Marshman. “Commentary on the Epistle of Jude.” In An American Commentary on the New Testament, 1888.

1850 Census: ME: York: Saco, p. 307B, p. 32 of 139:
Nathaniel M. Williams, age 36, Bap. clergyman, born in Mass.;
Julia A. L. “, age 36, born in ME;
Edward L. “, age 8, born in ME;
Nathaniel W. Williams, age 63, Bap. clergyman, born in Mass.;
Priscilla “, age 63, born in Mass.;
Hannah E. Bradbury, age 23, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Essex: Methuen:
Williams, Nathaniel M., 56, clergyman, $1000, born in Mass;
Julia A., 57, wife, born in ME;
Edward L., 27, no occupation, born in ME;
Mary S., 23, wife, born in ME;
Grace A., 6/12, born in MA.

1880 Census: MA: Middlesex, Other Townships, City of Lowell, ED 468, p. 12 of 45:
Williams, Nathaniel M., age 66, minister, born in MA, father and mother born in MA;
Julia L., age 67, wife, keeps house, born in ME, father born in ME, mother born in MA;
Edward L., age 37, boat builder, born in ME, father born in MA, mother born in ME;
Mary H., age 33, wife, keeps house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Grace H., age 10, daughter, born in MA, father and mother born in ME;
Bradbury, Elizabeth, age 75, born in ME, father and mother born in ME (sister of Julia L.);
Ames, Sarah, age 83, born in ME, father and mother born in ME (sister of Julia L.).

From Chapter II “Ecclesiastical History” of an original text written in 1885 by Fred Myron Colby, that is part of the Warner Section in the “Red Book” a book with history of all towns in Belknap and Merrimack Counties published in 1885, under the section called “Baptists”:
... Mr. Walker resigned in May 1881 and in the fall of that year, Rev. N. M. Williams, of Lowell, was installed as pastor, which position he continues to hold. [Baptist Church in Warner, New Hampshire]«s4», «s4», «s4» 
WILLIAMS, Rev. Nathaniel Marshman (I596)
 
36 "He came over from Bristol, Eng., with his father, Percival Lowle 1639 in the ship 'Jonathan," landed in Boston and settled in Newbury, Mass.

Richard Lowell was appointed one of the adminisrators of the estate of his brother John of Newbury on 6 Jul 1647 and guardian to his sons James and Joseph in May 1648.

1670, in a deed, he is called "gentleman."
1674, he and wife were members of the Newbury Mass. Church.
His will made June 25, 1681 may be found in.
He had a 'freehold right", No. 63, in the upper common, Newbury, Mass. (Essex Co. Prob. Rec., 19; 27).
June 2, 1650, effort was made to relieve him as overseer of an estate because he was "sickly and unable to look after their interests."

Members of Newbury Church in 1674.

The Will of Richard Lowle of Newbury was dated June 25, 1681 (date may have been 25 Jan 1681) and proved 26 September 1682. To "my loveing & beloved wife Margaret, all my household Gods (Except ñmy great Bible and ñmy great pot) & Chattels with house & land & orchard and ñmeadow, during her widowhood, or naturall life if shee remains a wide." He appointed Margaret as the sole executrix, "And after her I give & bequeath unto my son percivall Lowle, all my house & Barne & outhousing & orchard with all my land adjoyning to my house (except [twelve?] acres on the northeasterly side of my Land). Also…my twlve acres of Marsh in the great marshes by the Plumb bushes, and five acres of marsh or meadow below Benamin Rolfes, and two acres of my Marsh of the eight acres at old Towne and also the one-halfe of my freehold & previdedg of commonage and my great pot & my great Bible. And I do hereby acknowledge that the meadow in Birchen Meadows which was formerly mine to bee my son Percivall's by purchase. Also I give and beqeath to my son Thomas Lowle twelve acres of my Upland adjoyneing to James Brownes and Nathaniel Clarkes land & widow Muzzeyes Land. So much in breadth at the street as running the whole length, bearing an equall breadth as shall amount to twelve acres. Always provided that if my son Samuel Lowle desire one acre of Land to build a house for his settled habitation, then my son Thomas shall let my Son Samuel have an acre adjoyneing to the widow Muzzeyes Land foure Rods in fron next the Street and forty Rods in Length, but if ñmy Son Samuel shall refuse or relinquish his Right in the acre of Land… Then my son Thomas shall pay to the said son Samuell six pound in current Newengl: silver money or ten pound in Currant [pay?]. Also I give to my Sonne Thomas Lowle all my Plumb Island Lott of Marsh Land, and six acres of my eight acres of Salt Marsh at the old Towne marsh, also I give to him the other halfe of my freehold or previledg in the Comoning or Comon lands. And after my wive's decease, I give all my household Goods & movables: of what kind soever within or without doors, to be equally dividd between my two sons Percival Lowle & Thomas Lowle or their heires. Also I give all my living Stock of Cattell to my Son Tho: Lowle. Also I give liberty to mly Sonne Thomas Lowele to live in the house & have the sixt part of the Apples yearly so long as he lives a single man without a wife and no longer, and I give a booke called Mr. Hooker's politic unto Anthony Somerby…"Witnesses were Tristram Coffin and Anthony Somerby. 
LOWLE, Richard (I320)
 
37 "He is a carpenter. Res. Waltham, Mass."

At the time of the 1880 census, is listed as living with mother in Newport, Maine.

The census record below is not confirmed as being same as individual listed on record:
1880 Census: MA: Essex: Lynn, ED#212, p. 158A (living as a boarder at the home of Hosea B. Ripley):
Lowell, Chas. A., single, age 22, born in ME, carpenter.

Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol 325, p. 287, Marriage record:
Date of Marriage: December 24, 1881
Charles A. Lowell, Residence: Lynn, 24, carpenter, Place of Birth: Chesterville, Me, William F. and Clara H., first marriage, A A. Williams, clergymen
Mary A. Billings, Residence: Lynn, 23, Place of Birth: East Newport, Me, Simeon and Sarah, first marriage.

1900 Census: MA: Middlesex: Other Townships, ED #983, p. 2A: 92 Alder Street:
Lowell, Charles A., head, born Oct. 1856, age 43, married for 19 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, carpenter;
Mary A., his wife, born May 1856, age 44, married for 19 years, has had 1 child, still living, born in NY, father and mother born in NY;
William F., their son, born May 1890, age 10, single, born in MA, father born in ME, mother born in NY.

1910 Census: MA: Middlesex: Other Townships: ED#1050 (Waltham) p. 3:
living at 92 Alder Street:
Lowell, Charles A., head, age 52, married once for 23 years (?), born in ME, father and mother born in ME, building contractor;
Mary A., his wife, age 52, married twice for 28 years, has had 2 children, both living, born in ME, father born in NY, mother born in ?;
W. Frank, their son, age 19, single, born in MA, father and mother born in ME, is a cotton mill worker.

1920 Census: Massachusetts, Middlesex County, Waltham ED#507, Ward 6, Precinct 1, 92 Alder Street:
Lowell, Charles A., head, 63, married, born in Maine, father and mother born in Maine, house carpenter;
Mary A., his wife, age 66, born in New York, father and mother born in England;
and two female lodgers.

No 1930 census record located for Charles or Mary Lowell.«s4» 
LOWELL, Charles Albert (I299)
 
38 "He is a hardware merchant and banker and res. in Colorado Springs, Col."

Benjamin F. Lowell had a substitute for the Civil War whose name was Patrick Riley, who served in the Army for 3 years, mustering out in March 16, 1865.

1900 Census: Colorado: El Paso County: Colorado Springs:
Lowell, Benjamin F., head, Sept. 1855, 44, married for 16 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, hardware merchant;
Clara L., wife, Aug 1867, 32, married for 16 years, has had 2 children, both living, born in IA, father born in MA, mother born in Germany;
Raymond, son, Apr 1885, 15, single, born in CO, father born in ME, mother born in IA, at school;
Charlie L., son, Sept 1889, 10, single, born in CO, father born in ME, mother born in IA, at school.

1910 Census: Colorado: El Paso County: Colorado Springs, 3-wd: p. 23A:
Lowell, Benjamin F., head, 53, first marriage, married for 26 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, hardware merchant;
Clara L., wife, 42, first marriage, married for 26 years, has had 2 children, both living, born in IA, father and mother born in IA;
Charley L, son, 21, single, born in CO, father born in ME, mother born in IA;
plus 2 servants.

1920 Census: Colorado, El Paso County, Colorado Springs:
Lowell, Benjamin F. head, rents, 61, married, born in Maine, father & mother born in Maine;
Clara L., his wife, 50, born in Iowa, father born in Massachusetts, mother born in Illinois;
Stock, Lena, servant, 44, single, born in Iowa, father born in Germany, mother born in Wisconsin;
Weismann, John, yardman, 60, single, born in Ohio, father born in Germany, mother born in Alsace Lorraine.

Had a hardware store in Idaho Springs and then in the early 20s moved to Colorado Springs where he also had a hardware store.

From "The Weekly Gazette", Colorado Springs, Colorado, Thursday, 19 April, 1906:
"Mr. and B. F. Lowell [sic] entertained the governor's party, Monday, after the visit to the Deaf and Blind Institute. At luncheon, those enjoying Mr. and Mrs. Lowell's hospitality were Governor and Mrs. Jesse F. McDonald, Mrs. Hager, Mrs. James Williams and Mrs. A. G. Rhodes, all of Denver."

From the Colorado Springs Gazette: Sunday, July 15, 1906:
“Card Parties: Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell, 727 North Nevada avenue, gave an elaborate card party Thursday evening, complimentary to their son, Mr. J. Raymond Lowell and his bride. There were ten tables and the game enjoyed was six-handed euchre. The pretty prizes were won by Mrs. James P. Shearer and Mr. L. L. Aitken.
Cards were played in the billiard room which was artistically decorated with Indian paint brush and other wild flowers. In the drawing room, where the guests were welcomed, the flowers were bridesmaid roses and baby’s breath. In the library were daybreak carnations, snapdragons and ferns, and in the dining rooms and reception hall were marguerites and snapdragons mingled with tropical plants.”

Under the “Society” section of the Colorado Spring Gazette, Dec. 26, 1909:
“Family Christmas Tree and Dinner: In the pleasant home of Mr.and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell, 727 North Nevada avenue, Christmas day there was an elaborate dinner and Christmas tree participated in by the immediate members of the family.”

Under the “Society” section of the Colorado Spring Gazette, Dec. 26, 1909:
“Mr. Charles Lowell, who is a student in the State university at Boulder, is spending the holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell, 727 North Nevada avenue.”

Under the “Society” section of the Colorado Spring Gazette, June 26, 1910:
“The dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Matthews were Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell, Mr. Charles Lowell, and Mr. D. P. Leedham.”

Under the “Society” section of the Colorado Spring Gazette, June 25, 1911:
“The season at Broadmoor hotel and casino was most auspiciously inaugurated Thursday evening...Among the many others enjoying the evening were...Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell, Mr. and Mrs. J. Raymond Lowell...”

Under “Personal Mention” from the Colorado Spring Gazette, Dec. 25, 1913:
“Mr. and Mrs. Kingsley of Iowa are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Lowell.”

Obituary: Colorado Springs Gazette, Sunday, April 25, 1920:
"BENJAMIN F. LOWELL PNEUMONIA VICTIM
Pioneer Hardware Merchant Dies at Home; Had Been Ill for Some Time
B. F. Lowell, an old resident and one of the best known merchants of Colorado Springs, died early last evening at his home, 1615 North Cascade Avenue, from pneumonia, which he contracted several days ago. He had been in poor health for more than a year.
Mr. Lowell, who would have been 65 years of age next October, was born in Chesterville, Me., and had been a reident of Colorado Springs for 25 years, coming here from Black Hawk, Colo., where he conducted a hardware store. At the time of his death he owned the controlling interest in the Lowell-Meservey Hardware company of this city, tho for the last three years he had not devoted any time to the management of the firm, delegating the task to his son, J. Ray Lowell. His former partner, A. B. Meservey, died eight years ago.
Mr. Lowell was one of the directors of the First National bank, and a member of the Masons and Elks, of the El Paso club and of the Colorado Springs and Broadmoor Golf clubs. A son, Charles Lowell, is the owner of a hardware store in Fort Collings, Colo., and Mr. Lowell and his two sons also had a hardware store in Idaho Springs. He is survivied by his wife and two [continuation of article not scanned]"

News Article: Denver Post, Friday, April 30, 1920, Denver, Colorado:
"B.F. LOWELL LEFT $140,000 ESTATE
Colorado Springs, Colo., April 30. J. Ray Lowell has been named administrator for the estate of his father, B. F. Lowell, who died last Saturday. The estate, the inventory shows, is valued at $140,000. Lowell owned hardware stores in Fort Collins, Boulder, and Colorado Springs. The heirs are the widow and two sons, J. R. Lowell of this city and C. L. Lowell of Fort Collings." 
LOWELL, Benjamin Franklin (I302)
 
39 "He married 1st Julia Frances Lowell, daughter of Reuben Lowell, Jr."

1870 Census: CA: Sierra Cty: Gibson Township, b. 67 of 147, taken on July 5, 1870:
McFarland, A., age 43, water agent, real estate valued at $8000, personal property valued at $400, born in Indiana;
Julia, age 29, keeping house, born in Maine;
Lola [sic] E., age 2/12, at home, born in Calif.;
Adler, Mary J., age 18, domestic Servant, born in Missouri.

1880 Census: CA: Napa: Montivello ED#74, Yountville, Napa County, p. 23 of 29:
McFarland, Able, age 53, farmer;
Lulu, age 10, daughter, at home.

Contains description of gold mining investment by Abel McFarland, Lowell, and Clough:
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ca/sierra/history/1882/illustra/miningof159nms.txt«s11» 
MCFARLAND, Abel (I593)
 
40 "He removed to California and res. in Fort Bidwell, Cal., where he is engaged in mercantile pursuits."
"He is a thorough, stirring business man of the hustling western type, and of course succeeds as he deserves; was well educated in the best schools within reach and is a man of commanding influence."

Served as Secretary of the North East Lodge, No. 266, Fort Bidwell, Modoc County, of the Grand Lodge of California-Free and Accepted Masons, in 1882. Later served as Grand Master, date unknown.

Listed as a merchant under Fort Bidwell, in the Modoc County, CA 1885 Directory.

1900 Census: CA: Modoc Cty: Bidwell Twnship:
Lowell, Albert C. head, born Aug 1849, age 50, marrried for 22 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, hardware merchant;
Eliza C. his wife, born Dec. 1856, age 43, married for 22 years, has had two children, both living, born in CA, father and mother born in MA;
Chester G., son, born July 1896, age 3, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in CA.

1910 Census: CA: Modoc: Other Townships: ED#39 p. 5 of 32:
51 Bridge Street:
Lowell, Albert C., head, age 60, married for 32 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, retail merchant, general store;
Eliza C., his wife, age 53, married for 32 years, has had two children, both living, born in CA, mother and father born in MA.«s11», «s11» 
LOWELL, Albert Carroll (I606)
 
41 "He res. Washington, D.C."

1910 Census: CA: Modoc: Other Townships: ED#39
Lowell, Walter R., head, age 30, married, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in CA, bank cashier;
Bessie P., his wife, age 26, married, born in CA, father born in OH, mother born in IN;
Clayton W., their son, age 2, single, born in CA, father and mother born in CA;
Lucille E., their daughter, age 1, single, born in CA, father and mother born in CA.

From the Oakland Tribune, Thursday, August 18, 1910:
“Banker is Loser in Life’s Battle
Walter C. Lowell Dies in Berkeley after a Year’s Vain Fight
BERKELEY--Aug. 18.--After a year’s vain fight for health in the bracing air of the coast, Walter C. Lowell, formerly a banker of Modoc county, died here yesterday afternoon. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Lowell, 1526 Oxford street, and was 39 years old.
About a year ago he gave up his business duties on account of his health and came to Berkeley with his family, making his home with his father, who is himself a retired banker. Besides his parents, he leaves a wife, Elizabeth, and two children, Clayton and Lucille. Arrangements for the funeral have not yet been completed.”

From the San Francisco Call, Friday, August 19, 1910:
“MODOC COUNTY MAN DIES IN BERKELEY
“Walter R. Lowell Dead at Age
of Thirty Years”
“BERKELEY, Aug. 18--Walter R. Lowell, son of Albert C. Lowell, a retired banker of Modoc county, who has been making his home at 1626 Oxford street, died yesterday after an illness of several months.
“Lowell was engaged in the banking business with his father until his illness compeled his removal to this city.
“Besides his parents he is survived by his widow, Elizabeth Lowell, and two children, Lucille E. and Clayton W. Lowell. He was a native of San Francisco, 30 years of age.
The funeral will be held from a local undertaking parlor Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.”«s4» 
LOWELL, Walter Reuben (I609)
 
42 "He served in the Civil War in the 1st Minn. Inft. from 1861 to 1864, is a merchant and res. Aitken, Minn."

1880 Census: MN: Aiken, Aiken Village, recorded June 7, 1880:
Lowell, Edwin D., age 47, lumberman, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Anna, age 22, keeping house, born in Norway, father and mother born in Norway;
Belle F., age 24, niece, born in MN, father and mother born in ME;
Emma Marion, age 1/12, May, daughter, born in MN, father born in ME, mother born in Norway.

1900 Census: MN; Aitkin: Aitkin:
Lowell, Edwin B., head, born Mar 1833, age 67, married for 22 years, born in ME, father born in ME, mother born in ?, merchant;
Anna, his wife, born June 1858, age 41, married for 22 years, has had five children, all living, born in Norway, father and mother born in Norway, came to the U.S. in 1876 has been here for 24 years;
Miriam I., their daughter, born May 1882, age 18, single, born in MN, father born in ME, mother born in Norway, at school;
Louisa M., their daughter, born July 1884, age 15, single, born in MN, father born in ME, mother born in Norway, at school;
Edwin L., their son, born Aug 1887, 12, single, born in MN, father born in ME, mother born in Norway, at school;
Albert J., their son, born Dec. 1890, age 9, single, born in MN, father born in ME, mother born in Norway, at school;
Haugen, Mary, his mother-in-law, born Feb. 1831, age 69, widowed, born in Norway, father and mother born in Norway.«s4» 
LOWELL, Edwin Berry (I500)
 
43 "He served in the Civil War, Co. "M," 1st Regt. Me. Cav., from Abbot, Piscataquis, Maine., single; private; 26 years of age. Res. Dexter, Penobscot, Maine."

1870 Census: ME: Penobscott: Dexter:
Lowell, Charles H., 34, farmer, $2000, $1025, born in ME;
Abbie V., 26, keeping house, born in ME;
Ammi M., 1, at home, born in ME;
Kendall, Mary, 60, without occupation, born in ME.

1880 Census: ME: Penobscot: Dexter, p. 537C:
Lowell, Charles Henry, age 44, farmer;
Abbie V., age 36, keeping house;
Amy M., age 11, at scshool;
Orpha N., age 9.

1900 Census: ME: Penobscot: Dexter:
Lowel, Charles H., head, July 1837, 63, married for 34 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, farmer;
Abbie B., wife, May 1844, 56, married for 34 years, has had 2 children, 1 still living, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.«s4» 
LOWELL, Charles Henry (I490)
 
44 "He settled in Sonoma, Cal. 1859, where he was a horticulturist."

1880 Census: CA: Sonoma: Sonoma: ED#120 p. 6 of 43:
Lowell, A. D., age 43, farmer, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Clara, age 31, his wife, keeping house, born in MA, father born in ME, mother born in VT;
Frederick A., age 7, their son, at home, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in MA;
Charles H., age 5, their son, at home, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in MA;
Mabel, age 1, their daughter, at home, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in MA.

1900 Census Sonoma Township, Sonoma County, CA:
Lowell, Arthur D., head, born Jun 1836, age 63, married for 23 years, born in Maine, father and mother born in Maine, is a fruit grower;
Clarice J., his wife, born May 1849, age 51, married for 23 years, had five children, all of whom are living, born in Maine, father born in Maine, mother born in Vermont, is a housekeeper;
Fred A., their son, born in 1873, age 26
Charles H., their son, born in 1871, age 29
Lilly Mabele, their daughter, born in 1879, age 22,
George R. , their son, born in 1883, age 17
Arthur P., their son, born in 1888, age 12.«s11» 
LOWELL, Arthur Drinkwater (I614)
 
45 "He studied law and attained considerable eminence as a lawyer. He settled in Lubec, Me., in trade 1814, later he removed to Ellsworth, Me., practiced law there, and in 1826 established the "Independent Courier." 1837 he also established at Ellsworth the "Northern Statesman," of which he was editor and proprietor."

Advertisement appearing in The Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) 27 Sep 1844, Fri:
"CHARLES LOWELL,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
Ellsworth, Hancock County, Maine"

1850 Census: ME: Hancock, Ellsworth, p. 37 of 96:
Chas. Lowell, 60, lawyer, born in ME;
Susan, 50, born in ME.

Held at the Maine Historical Society: “Report of the Trial of an Action; Charles Lowell against John Faxon and Micajah Hawks, defendants, for Malpractice in the capacity of Physicians and Surgeons, at the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine Holden at Machias for the County of Washington--June Term, 1824, before the Hon. Nathan Weston, Jun. Justice of the Court. Portland: Printed for James Adams, Jr., by David and Seth Paine, 1825. Partial summary from the “Report of the Case”: “Charles Lowell, the Plaintiff, declared against John Faxon and Micajah Hawks, the Defendants, as having been engaged and employed by him in the capacity of Physicians and Surgeons, to reduce his left hip joint, which had been disloacted on the 7th September, 1821; and alledged that they undertook to do it; but proceeded so carelessly and managed with such ignorance, unskilfulness and negligence that they failed to reduce, and the plaintiff thereby lost the use of, the limb, with other injuries, and laying the damages ten thousand dollars.--The defendants pleaded severally not guilty.
Mutual challenges were made on both sides to the jurors, as they were called, on account of favour or prejudice; in consequence of which several were excluded, among whom were all the jurors summoned from Eastport, the place of Doct. Hawks’ resiidence, who were objected to by the plaintiff’s counsel. Some time was consumed in canvassing these objections, until a jury was finally empannelled and the trial proceeded. It occupied the two succeeding days and terminated on Thursday, by the disagreement of the jury, and the dismissal of the action by the advice of court and consent of parties. ... Mr. Greenleaf for the Plaintiff opened the case to the jury. On the 7th of November, Mr. Lowell was riding a young and restive horsese, which suddenly reared and fell. He was flung on his back and fell upon his left side. The horse fell upon him with his weight inside of the left thigh and occasioned a dislocation of the left hip.” [The trial alleged malpractice in treating the dislocation] 
LOWELL, Charles C. (I568)
 
46 "He succeeded to the pioneer farm of his grandfather Reuben, in Farmington, Franklin, Maine., where he res. until d."

"Timothy Bartlett Lowell went to Abbot when a young man, and was in business there for a time. He returned to Farmington in 1844, and took his father's farm, where he resided until his death. "

lists marriage date as Aug. 25, 1844

1850 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington: p. 49 of 67:
Timothy B. Lowell, 40, farmer, born in ME;
Wealthy, 24, born in ME;
Julia E., 4, born in ME;
George E., 2, born in ME:
John F., 13, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Framington, p. 593:
Timothy B. Lowell, 50 farmer, $2500, $1600, born in ME;
Wealthy S., 34, born in ME;
Julia E., 14, born in ME;
George E., 12, born in ME;
William H., 8, born in ME;
Amanda, 5, born in ME;
Timothy, 5/12, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington: P. 3 of 83:
Lowell, Timothy B., age 60, farmer, real estate valued at $3000, personal property valued at $1500, born in Maine;
W. S., age 44, keeping house, born in ME;
Julia E., age 24, school teacher, born in ME;
George E., age 22, farm laborer, born in ME;
Hervey W., age 18, farm laborer, born in ME;
Howard E., age 8, at home, born in ME.

1880 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington: p. 20:
Lowell, Timothy, 71, farmer, born in ME, father born in NH, mother born in ME;
Wealthy, 54, wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Amanda P., 25, daughter, dress maker, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Elmer H., 18, son, works on farm, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Welch, Emma A., 31, housekeeper, born in ME, father and mother born in ME., , 
LOWELL, Timothy Bartlett (I431)
 
47 "He was a 'mariner'."
Was residing in Amesbury as of 1748. 
LOWELL, Stephen (I314)
 
48 "He was a farmer and carriage maker and res. on the farm on the west side of the river, since owned by J. Dearborn Josselyn."

"John Lowell, Jr., was a farmer and carriage-maker, and resided on the farm on the west side of the river now owned by J. Dearborn Josselyn."

1850 Census: Maine: Franklin: Farmington, p. 56 of 67:
John Lowell, Jr., age 43, male, farmer, $1400, born in ME;
Sarah, age 37, female, born in ME;
Sarah R., age 20, female, born in ME;
John R., age 17, male, farmer, born in ME;
Hannah M., age 15, female, born in ME;
Benja. F., age 11, male, born in ME;
Joseph K., age 5, male, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, Pg. 595:
John Lowell, Jr., age 53, farmer, $2200, $450, born in ME;
Sarah, age 47, born in ME;
Benj. F., age 23, carriage maker, $400, born in ME;
Hannah M., age 24, domestic, born in ME;
Joseph K., age 15, farm laborer.«s11», «s4» 
LOWELL, John Jr. (I392)
 
49 "He was a fine scholar, prepared for the ministry, but his health failed and he settled in Farmington, Franklin, Maine., where he was a merchant."

One source indicates that spouse’s name was Lois Bartlett. Cemetery records for Riverside Cemetery indicate that spouse’s first name is Abigail.

Remains were originally buried in the Center Meeting House Cemetery. Permission to move them to Riverside Cemetery was granted in June 18, 1890.«s4», «s4» 
LOWELL, Rosamus K. (I574)
 
50 "He was a member of school board from age of 21 years to d."

indicates birth date as Feb. 3, 1824.,

Death Announcement: Maine Cultivator and Hallowell Gazette (Hallowell, ME) Page 3, Saturday, August 28, 1847:
“In Chesterville, Charles Lowell, aged 24.” 
LOWELL, Charles (I307)
 
51 "He was a pioneer of California, going there via "the horn" 1849, landing at San Francisco Sept. 13, 1849. He is an orchardist."

Unable to locate 1870 Census record.

1880 Census: CA: Alameda: Washington Township, taken June 16, 1880:
Nichols, Charles, 54, farmer, born in MA, father born in NH, mother born in NY;
Elizabeth A., 48, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Charles G. P. 14, at home, born in CA, father born in MA, mother born in ME
Lowell, Philip, 71, father-in-law, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.«s4» 
NICHOLS, Charles (I475)
 
52 "He was a surgeon in the Mexican and Civil Wars, during the latter he was stationed for a time at Finley Hospital at Washington, D.C. He was also first State Mineralogist of California and Nevada, a man of ability and wide influence."

1870 Census: CA: San Francisco: San Francisco: Ward 5, pg. 2:
Trask, Jno B., 48, doctor, $1400, $300, born in Mass;
Abbie, 20, keeps house, $300, born in ME;
Hattie McM, 2, at home, born in CA;
Smith Maria P., 35, at home, 5000, 1000, born in Mass.

Comments on Find A Grave, posted by Great-granddaughter Marilyn June Wilson:
"Married to Abbie Maria Lowell in San Francisco on Sept. 2, 1865.
California's Physicial-Geologist, 1849-1879
San Francisco Physician, conducted several geological and agricultural excursions into the Sierra Nevada.
1854-June-Dec. John Boardman Trask's geological report on the agricultural and mineral resources of the coastal mountains is presented to the state legislature of California.
(Traskite) is a mineral found Rush Creei, Fresno County, California, USA and is named after John Trask.
Last Address: 206 Kearny, San Francisco, CA. 
TRASK, John Boardman (I470)
 
53 "He was a teacher and lumber merchant and res. in Sheffield, N.B."
According to Delmar Lowell, he married a second time in N.B.; name of second spouse unknown.
Believe that Archibald Lowell had as children at least the following:
Sarah J. Lowell
John J. Lowell (who lived with Joshua A. Lowell at the time of the 1850 census)
Archibald Lowell (“)
Cannot confirm any of the above, however.--GRL, 
LOWELL, Archibald C. (I566)
 
54 "He was a trader and lived until d. in Dover, Lincoln, Maine. He served in the Union Army in the Civil War for one year."

1880 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Dover, p. 49A:
Lowell, Benjamin, age 35, grocer;
Delia, age 37, wife, keeps house;
Lowell, Phidelis, age 64, keeps house.«s4» 
LOWELL, Benjamin Cofren (I428)
 
55 "He was a very well-educated man." His father left the money for Flora's education. George McCartney's parents lived in Iowa but before Flora was born they moved to California. The clock at George and Hazel's belonged originally to Flora's grandpa. Flora is 12 yrs. older than I am and Flora's father died when she was a baby. She said that when her grandparents moved from Iowa to California, this clock was an old clock that they didn't want to take with them so they gave it to Flora's parents. It had no hands, no face, split at the top. So I fixed it up. It's an eight day clock. Every Sunday I wind it. "

George McCartney's father was called Judge McCartney. I don't know if he was a judge or a lawyer or what.

George McCartney died when Flora was 6 months old.

John F. Lowell family bible lists death date as "March 24, 1890."

George A. T. McCartney, from Vinton, Iowa, attended Notre Dame 1868/69, per student register lists. While a Junior at Notre Dame, he was one of the individuals who received, from the St. Cecilia Philomathean Association, a gold medal: "Prize Gold Medals for Good Conduct and for marked Improvement in Elocution during the scholastic year of 1868-1869 were awarded to the following young gentlemen of the Junior Collegiate Department:... First Honors: G. McCartney, Vinton, Iowa. [This society, one of the oldest and best at Notre Dame, is, at the same time, a Debating, Dramatic, and Musical Association. Its exercises include Public Reading, Declamations, Essays and a Moot Court. It has a good library and numbers forty members--the elite of the Junior Collegiate Department.]

George Anderson McCartney, from Vinton, Iowa, listed as a sub-freshman in Monmouth's 1873-74 Catalog; he is listed as a freshman in the 1874-75 Monmouth College Catalogue, Monmouth, Illinois, in their Classical Course.

U.S. Passport Applications 1795-1925:
State of Iowa
County of Benton
I, Geo. Andrew McCartney do swear that I was born in the City of Vinton, State of Iowa in or about the 16th of April, A. D. 1855; that I am a native and loyal citizen of the United States and about to travel abroad in Germany, Austria, France, Great Britain, and Ireland,
Sworn to before me this twenty-third day of October, 1877
Alfred Haines, Notary Public

George McCartney was in Gottinghen, Germany, studying, during a period of time that included March 1878.

From the University Archives at the University of Leipzig, a list of American students who have studied at Leipzig:
"George Andrew McCartney
geboren in VintonVaterland: AmericaLebensalter: 24
Datum der Immatrikulation: 16.10.1879
Semester: 1878/79
Studium: Jura
Stand der Eltern: Gutsbesitzer
Religion: Prot.
Letzter Aufenthalt vor Studienbeginn: Leipzig
Wohnung in Leipzig: Nürnberger No. 1, I. Et."

From the Benton County Herald, July 19, 1881:
"George McCartney returned from Germany, last week, after an absence of several years."

From The New Era, Nov. 28, 1885:
“Mr. McCartney is writing up abstracts for Vale P. Thielman.”

Newspaper article: The Canton Advocate (Canton, South Dakota) 04 Aug 1887, Thur.
"The members of the Parker baseball nine are F. E. Tyler, H. F. Tyler, H. F. Bertleson, G. W. Stone, F. Cole, W. Case, H. Sanborn, S. Hinkley and J. S. Dibley. The visitors from Parker were S. F. Maine, L. H. Case and Geo. A. McCartney."

Marriage records of Minnehaha County 1879-1892 list marriage as Dec. 17, 1888.

From The New Era, Dec. 22, 1888:

“Mr. George A. McCartney, of this city, and Miss Minnie Lowell, of Minnehaha county, were united in marriage at Sioux Falls on Monday, December 17th, 1888, Rev. F. M. Robertson officiating.

“The bride, Miss Minnie Lowell, is the accomplished daughter of Mr. John Lowell, who resides near Sioux Falls. She is a young lady of rare graces of mind and person, who has won a large circle of warm, true friends not only at her home, but elsewhere where she is known.

“The groom, Mr. McCartney, has long been a resident of this city, where his sterling moral qualities and fine business ability have won for him the confidence and esteem of all.

“Mr. and Mrs. McCartney have settled down to housekeeping in their neat home in this city, and The New Era joins with their host of friends in wishing them all possible joy and prosperity.”

Newspaper Notice: Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 07 Jan 1889, Mon.
"Bee Hive's Grand Drawing: The following is a list of the Prizes so far as is known
Geo. A. McCartney, Parker, Dakota…..Ticket No. 10147

News Article: Sioux City Journal (Sioux City, Iowa) 27 Mar 1890, Thu.:
"Notes from Parker.
PARKER, March 26.-Special: Geo. A. McCartney, clerk of the court for this district died this morning at 5 o'clock. He has been suffering from diabetes for a number of years. The excitement attending the burning of the county building brought the disease to a fatal conclusion in two days' time. He leaves a wife and one child. He was a young man of good ability and steady habits.
The commissioners are in special session this afternoon to conclude arrangements for re-binding the county records, they being damaged more than was supposed on first report.
The death of the clerk of the court makes another appointment necessary and the commissioners are flooded with applcants for the position."

Newpaper article: The Record (National City, California) 27 Mar 1890 Thu.
"Judge John McCartney received a telegram yesterday morning announcing the death of his son, Geo. A. McCartney at Parker, Dakota. He had been a resident of that place for four years, and was Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts."

From The New Era, Parker, Turner, South Dakota, March 29, 1890:
“The whole community was saddened Wednesday morning to hear of the death of George A. McCartney, one of Parker’s best and most highly esteemed young men. The deceased came here from Vinton, Iowa, about five years ago and accepted a position as clerk in Thielman’s real estate and loan office, where he remained in employment till about two years ago, when he was appointed clerk of the circuit and county courts for this county. These positions he filled intelligently, honourably and acceptably to his employers and the public. A year ago last fall he was married to Miss Minnie Lowell of Sioux Falls, and now leaves his estimable young wife and infant daughter husbandless and fatherless. The deceased was aged 33 years. He had been an invalid of diabetis for a year or more, and has been nearing death’s door for several weeks past. On Monday morning he responded to the fire alarm and aided in rescuing the effects of his office from the burning building. The excitement and exposure of the occasion was too much for his weakened condition, and final dissolution came speedily. The funeral was held yesterday, Rev. T. B. Boughton preaching the funeral sermon, and interment was given in the village cemetery. Mrs. McCartney has the sympathy of the whole community in her sad affliction.”, , 
MCCARTNEY, George Andrew T. (I658)
 
56 "He was an associate of John Hayes Hammond of South Africa, and is a mining engineer and res. at Johannesburg, South Africa."

As reported in the Oakland Daily Evening, June 3, 1876: The High School of Oakland: Graduates of ‘76: Edwin Garthwaite”

Was Secretary of the California Alumni Association (UC Berkeley) for the class of 1880 and was living as of Sep. 4, 1931.

1920 Census: CA: Alameda Cty: Oakland: 391 Fairmont Ave.
Garthwaite, Edwin H., owns his home, age 62, born in CA, father born in England, mother born in NY, occupation: mining engineer but out of work;
Augusta, his wife, age 62, born in CA, father and mother born in ME, church organist;
Margaret, their daughter, age 27, born in Mexico, father and mother born in CA, university secretary.

1930 Census: CA: Alameda: Berkeley, Dist. 319:
Garthwaite, Edwin H., head, rents, age 72, first married at age 33.
Augusta L., his wife, age 72, first married at age 33.«s4» 
GARTHWAITE, Edwin Hatfield (I637)
 
57 "He was at first a minister in Whitneyville, Me.
He studied law; was probate judge in Orono, Me.
1865 he removed to Richfield, Minn., where he practiced his profession.
His family setled about him in Minnesota."

1850 Census: ME: Washington: Whitneyville, p. 4 of 13 (indexed incorrectly under Simin Lowell):
Simeon B. Lowell, age 44, lumberman, $375, born in ME;
Mary A. S. Lowell, age 43, born in Mass.;
Martha A., age 21, born in ME;
John Q. A., age 20, born in ME;
Daniel G., age 17, born in ME;
Miranda T., age 15, born in ME;
Mary L., age 13, born in ME;
Mariah H., age 10, born in ME;
Malvina A., age 7, born in ME;
Frederick A., age 5, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Washington: Whitneyville, p. 814:
Simeon B. Lowell, 54, married, school teacher, $800, $180, born in ME;
Mary, 53, born in ME;
Frederic, 14, born in ME;
P.G.Hardswell, 25, minister, born in ME.

1870 Census: MN: Hennepin: Mpls, 3rd Wd,, p. 472:
Lowell, S. B., 63, lumber clerk, $2000, $1000, born in ME;
Mary A., 62, keeps house, born in Mass.;
Phelps, Phineas, 40, wood dealer, born in Mass.

1880 Census: MN: Richfield, Hennepin; p. 198D, p. 24 of 40:
Lowell, Simeon B., age 74, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Mary Ann, his wife, age 70, born in MA, father and mother born in MA;
Wardwell, Edward M., age 18, grandson, born in ME, father born in NH, mother born in ME;
Wardwell, Irving L., age 20, grandson, born in ME, father born in NH, mother born in ME.«s4» 
LOWELL, Simeon Bartlett (I530)
 
58 "He was grad. by Bowdoin College 1859, and studied law with the Hon. Charles P. Chandler, whose dau. he afterwards m. He was a prominent lawyer in Maine and Louisiana; was a Colonel in the Civil War and Provo Marshal-General on Gen. Canby's staff, C . "D," 1st H. Art. and later Colonel in Regt. from Abbot; 26 years old, entered as a private. At the close of the war he settled in New Orleans, La; was member and Speaker of the Louisiana Legislature and for several years was postmaster of New Orleans."

1860 Census: ME: Oxford: Norway Village, p 595:
Charles W. Lowell, 24, lawyer, born in ME.

Background notes from The Historical Society of Pennsylvania and its archive of the Charles W. Lowell papers:
“Charles Winthrop Lowell is a ninth generation descendent of Percival Lowell, who was the first Lowell to emigrate to America, in 1639. He was born to Hon. Phillip Smith Lowell and Harriet Butler Lowell on November 20, 1834, in Farmingham, Maine.
He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1859 and studied law with the Hon. Charles P. Chandler, whose daughter Mary Elizabeth he married in June of 1860. Their daughter, Mary Chandler Lowell, was born on January 18, 1864; her mother died six days later. He married again, ca. 1870, Sarah ("Sally") W. Huff of Salem, Va., but had no children from this marriage.”

Lowell was a prominent lawyer in Maine and Louisiana and served as a captain in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War. After the war, he continued military service as a colonel and provost marshal general. At the close of the war he settled in New Orleans, La., served as a member and speaker of the Louisiana legislature, and for several years was postmaster of New Orleans. Lowell died on October 5, 1877, in Foxcroft, Maine.

The 80th Regiment of United States Colored Troops (which was formerly known as the Corps d'Afrique or The Native Guards) was formed in Louisiana in 1863. The mustering of African-American soldiers during the Civil War was a key event that helped change the struggle from a war of politics to a war for freedom, a position which was not overtly recognized by the United States government until 1863.

“Charles (9) Winthrop Lowell (Percival (1)) b. in Farmington, Maine, Nov. 20, 1834: m. June 7 1860 Mary (8) Esther, b. Mar. 16, 1837, dau. of Hon. Charles (7) Parsons and Sarah (7) M. (Wheeler) Chandler of Foxcroft. When a lad of nine (9) years young Lowell came to Foxcroft with his parents. At once he entered Foxcroft Academy: and at an early age commenced teaching in rural schools. He finished his Academic training at Bowdoin College. While reading for his chosen profession, Laww, in the office of Hon. Charles P. Chandler, he was engaged in teaching in Sebec village, and as Assistant Preceptor of Foxcroft Academy. Upon his admission to the Bar, and his marriage with Miss Chandler, they took up their resident in Norway, Maine; where Mr. Lowell had formed a partnership with Hon. Mark H. Dunnell, later Member of Congress. He had not long to wait, for nearly his first case, a fiercely contested one, in which he won in each appealed instance, at once established his reputation as a sound lawyer and eloquent pleader. It gave him conspicuous preeminence at the Bar. In the fall of 1861 he was elected to the Maine Legislature, from Oxford County, and although one of the youngest members, speedily rose tto the front rank of influence. On the death of Mrs. Lowell’s brother, Col. Charles Peleg Chandler of the 1st. Mass. Inf., gallantly leading his men in that fierce conflict at Nelson’s Farm, Glendale, Virginia, 1862, Mr. and Mrs. Lowell returnerned to Foxcroft, to be with her widowed mother. At the earnest instance of Hon. John H. Rice, our member of Congress, Mr. Lowell entered into partnership, and they occupied the office of Mr. Lowell’s father-in-law, the late Hon. C. P. Chandler. The office building was on the site of the present Masonic Temple. Young Lowell was made a Trial Justice by Gov. Washburn. On January 24, 1863 his wife passed away, leaving a young daughter, only six days old! A month later, after making very thoughtful and generous provision for the care of his infant daughter, Mr. Lowell accepted a Captaincy in the Regiment under Brig. Gen. Ullman. Was promoted Col. 80th U.S. Infantry, Judge Advocate; Provost Marshall Gen. on Gov. Canby’s stafaff from Aug; 2, 1865 to March 1866, when Gen. Canby relieved him and made him Judge of the Provost Court at New Orleans, La. Col. Lowell’s military service closed in March 1867, when his regiment was mustered out. Col. Lowell passed the summer with his young daughter at their home in Foxcroft. In the fall, the Secretary of the Interior appointed him Commissioner of Indian Affairs; but Gen. Hancock’s insistence, that Col. Lowell should return to Louisiana and become Chairman of thhe Registration Board for Caddo Parish, was so strenuous that the Secretary and Col. Lowell yielded. In April 1868, Col. Lowell was elected to the House of Representatives, of the first General Assembly of Louisana, after reconstruction. He was elected a delegate to the Republican National Convention, at Chicago, in May 1868, which unanimously nominated Gen. Grant for the Presidency. Col. Lowell was made one of the secretaries of the convention. Upon the organization of the New Government of Louisana, he was unanimously elected Speaker of the House, a position he held until his death, with the single exception, of the period in which he served as Lt. Gov. of the State. President Grant offerred him an Ambassadorship, which he courteously, but very frankly refused to consider, even, because, as he phrased it, “I cannot bring myself to place an ocean between me and my dependant young daughter.” Pres. Grant then appointed Col. Lowell without proffer, to the Postmaastership of New Orleans. That he was a most conscientious, eloquent and effective leader of his Party, there was never any question. Col. Lowell was a practitioner in the Louisana Courts, a member of the Presbyterian Church, and of the Masonic Order of “Old Foxcroft” He was extensively interested in real estate, owning a valuable turpentine orchard near Mobile City, on Mobile Bay; and a large plantation above New Orleans, as well as his city residence. In 1868, 1870, and 1872 he ccanvassed the states, along the Atlantic Coast as far north as his native Maine. Returning south in 1870 he was accompanied by his young daughter and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Hale. At President Grant’s invitation they were received by him at the White House; where, to Mrs. Hale, the President paid a beautiful tribute of respect to the memory of her brother, Col. Charles P. Chandler. 1st Mass. Inf. Vol. Col. Lowell d. at his home in Foxcroft, Oct. 3, 1877--Buried in Rural Grove Cemetery.”

From the Daily Kennebec Journal, August 10, 1877:
“Col. Chas. W. Lowell died at Foxcroft, Wednesday, oct. 3d. Col. Lowell was a soldier in the war of the rebellion. When the war closed he settled at New Orleans. He was subsequently elected a member of the legislature of Louisiana and Speaker of that body. For several years he held the office of Postmaster of that city. His health failing him he came North, in the early part of the present season, and has since lingered through a painful sickness. He leaves a widow, and one child by a former wife.”, 
LOWELL, Captain and Honorable Charles Winthrop (I472)
 
59 "He was grad. by Colby University 1840, with first honors as valedictorian of his class.
In 1840, for one year, he ws principal of St. Brides Academy, Va.
From 1841 to 43, he studied law under Hiram Belcher, also his cousin, Hon. Joshua A. Lowell, was admitted to the bar of Washington, Co., Me. 1843. The same year he began practice with his cousin, Joshua A. Lowell of East Machias, Washington, Maine.; 1855 removed to Phillips, Franklin, Maine., and practiced there until 1861, when he removed to Farmington, Franklin, Maine., to take the office of clerk of courts of Franklin Co., which he held until 1874, at which date he resumed practice, which he continued in Farmington until d.
Though of feeble health, he seldom was absent from his daily work.
He was a man of brains, modest, universally honored, successful in all his undertakings, and above all a man of highest moral and religious character."

"Simeon H. Lowell, a son of Joshua B. Lowell, was born in Chesterville, August 16, 1816. He was educated at Waterville College, now Colby University, and studied law with his cousin, Joshua A. Lowell, in East Machias. In partnership with him, he began the practice of his profession, after being admitted to the bar in Washington County, August 28, 1843. In 1854, he removed to Phillips, and was in active practice there until elected clerk of courts in 1861, an office he held until 1874. He then resumed the practice of law in Farmington, which he continued with success until near the close of his life. Mr. Lowell was a safe counselor and adviser, and an excellent lawyer, being most exact and methodical in his business."

1850 Census: ME: Washington: E. Machias: p. 41:
Simeon H. Lowell, 33, lawyer, $1000, born in ME;
Louisa B., 29, born in ME;
Mary E., 2, born in ME;
Prescott, 1, born in ME;
Bridget Mulligan, 16, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Phillips, p. 474 of 533:
Simeon H. Lowell, age 43, lawyer, born in ME;
Louisa Lowell, age 37, housewife, born in ME;
Mary C. Lowell, age 12, born in ME;
Prescott Lowell, age 11, born in ME;
Franklin Lowell, age 8, born in ME;
Julia V. lowell, age 1/12, bornin ME.


Simeon Heath Lowell was Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, Maine, from 1861 to 1874.

U.S. Civil War Draft Registrations Records:
Residence: Farmington
Name: S. H. Lowell
[no age listed]
White or colored: White
Profession, Occupation or Trade: Clerk of Courts
Place of Birth: Maine

1870 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, p. 66 of 83:
Lowell, Simeon H., age 53, Clerk of Courts, Franklin Co., real estate valued at $3000, personal property valued at $1000, born in ME;
Louisa, age 49, keeping house, born in ME;
Mary E., age 22, music teacher;
Frank, age 18, student., 
LOWELL, Simeon Heath (I585)
 
60 "He was grad. by Cooper Medical College, San Francisco, Cal. 1896. Was a Surgeon in Cuban War, or Spanish War, 1898. Res. Sonoma, Cal."

1910 Census: CA: Los Angeles: Cahuenga Twp:
Lowell, Charles H., head, 35, first marriage, married for 11 years, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in MA, doctor, general practice;
Ottilie, wife, 34, first marriage, married for 11 years, has had 2 children, both living, born in CA, father and mother born in Germany;
Esther, daughter, 9, single, born in CA, father and mother born in CA;
Charles, son, 8, single, born in CA, father and mother born in CA.

1930 Census: CA: Monterey: Carmel-by-the-Sea: Dist. 44, p. 1 of 17:
living on San Antonio Avenue:
Lowell, Charles H., head, rents, age 55, first married at age 26, born in CA, father born in ME, mother born in MA, medical physician;
Ottilie, J., his wife, age 54, first married at age 25, born in CA, father and mother born in Germany;
Shields, Esther J., his daughter, age 29, first married at age 22, born in CA, father and mother born in CA, newspaper journalist;
Thomas A., his son-in-law, age 41, first married at age 34, born in Barbados, father born in NC, mother born in OH, newspaper journalist;
Allen L., his grandson, age 2 10/12, born in NY, father born in Barbados, mother born in CA.«s4» 
LOWELL, Charles Herbert (I619)
 
61 "He was well educated in the best schools; is a general merchant, carrying on an extensive business at West Farmington, Franklin, Maine., where he res."

"Hervey W. Lowell is a prosperous merchant at West Farmington, where he has been engaged in business since 1874."

From p. 762 "Errata and Addenda" of is the following--

"Hervey William Lowell deserves a better record. The following data reached me too late for insertion in the proper place. He is an active Republican, and for the past six years has been chairman of the Republican Town Committee. He has nevever acce ted offices though he has helped others to obtain them. He was reared on the homestead farm where his ancestor, Reuben Lowell, settled in 1783; was educated at the public schools and Wilton Academy; taught school for a time; 1774 became partner with Mr. A. H. Atwood in a general store; 1777 became sole proprietor of the store and successfully run the business until 1887 when he sold it out to his brother, Elmer H. Lowell, a young man of great business ability and who has since been its successful proprietor; since disposing of store he has been an extensive exporter of apples to England from all parts of the United States and Canada; 1887 he purchased the old homestead farm, the Lowell ancestral home for over 100 years, containing the remains of Reuben Lowell, his ancestor earliest at this place, and takes great pride in caring for this monument of his ancestors; June 13, 1881, he m. Henriett Keith Currier of Wilton; erected the fine house where he now resides."

1900 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, p. 77:
Lowell, Hervey W., head, born Dec. 1851, age 48, married for 19 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, apple buyer;
Etta K., his wife, born Sep 1861, age 38, married for 19 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Arthur C., their son, born Apr 1884, age 16, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME; at school.«s11», «s4», «s4» 
LOWELL, Hervey William (I446)
 
62 "Her maternal ancestry was Scotch-English; her father's ancestors were English. They are both Unitarians as to religious faith."«s4» CURRIER, Henrietta “Etta” Keith (I447)
 
63 "In 1790 he was appointed by President George Washington, keeper of the light-house on the north end of Plumb Island, at the mouth of the Merrimac River."

Was called "captain."«s4», «s4» 
LOWELL, Abner (I373)
 
64 "In early life he removed to New York and became a minister in the "Church of the Disciples"; preached in Onandaga Co., South Butler, Wayne Co., and Troy, N.Y., and d. at South Butler, N.Y., where he was a minister for 15 years.
He was one of the most distinguished clergyman of the Campbellite Church. His natural bent of mind was polemic, with strong argumentative and reasoning powers. He was a vigourous writer and a good literary critic.
He had, in one of his revival meetings, the since distinguished President James A. Garfield to assist him. Garfield was then a student in Hiram College."

1850 Census: NY: Wayne: Savannah: p. 22 of 43:
Josiah I. Lowell, age 57, born in ME;
Mary P. “, age 50, born in ME;
J. Adams “ , age 20, laborer, born in ME;
Josiah M. “, age 15, born in ME;
Mary H. “, age 12, born in ME.«s4» 
LOWELL, Rev. Josiah Ingraham "J. I." (I558)
 
65 "Indiana County Pennsylvania, Her People, Past and Present," Volume II (J. T. Stewart, 1913), sketch of Joseph Shaffer, pages 1217-8:
"Jacob Shaffer, son of John [and Eva Thomas], was born in Berks county, and was about seven years of age when taken to Huntingdon county in 1803. There he was reared to manhood, the greater part of his education being secured in the school of hard work. He was engaged in farming, and also conducted a freighting business, carrying goods to Pittsburg [sic]. In 1838 he brought his family to Indiana county, coming through with a wagon and four-horse team, and located on the land which Joseph Shaffer now operates, here purchasing 238 acres for $1,700. On this property were located a log cabin and barn, and about one hundred acres was cleared, and here he continued to work until his death, which occurred in 1882, when he was eighty-seven years of age, his wife [Elizabeth Fetterhoff] surviving him two years and being eighty-nine years old at the time of her demise. For ten years Mr. Shaffer was a justice of the peace, and also held various other offices, to which he was elected on the Whig and Republican tickets. With his wife he was an active member of the Lutheran Church, and both were well known and highly respected. They had a family of nine children, as follows: Eva married Charles Wilhelm, and both are deceased; Michael, deceased, who married Martha Thomas, lived in West Mahoning township; John, deceased, who married Mary Ann Means, lived in North Mahoning township; George died unmarried in 1852; Elizabeth, deceased, married Samuel Beck, and lived in North Mahoning township; Joseph is mentioned below; Albert, who served nine months as a member of Company B, 206th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and now lives at Covode, Pa., married Mary Chambers and (second) Sarah Varner; Margaret Ann has always lived on the old home place and is now keeping house for her brother Joseph; Jacob, deceased, married Minerva Fraupton [sic], and lived in North Mahoning township." 
SHAFFER, Jacob (I18188)
 
66 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. STROBEL, Jacob Gregory (I10099)
 
67 "Lives on one of the Sandwich Islands."

lists birthdate as 1808

“He was a carpenter and farmer, and was a very prominent citizen of Abbot, Me., for some years.
In 1856 he was State Senator in Maine, having previously in 1842 been a member of the lower house of the legislature.
He removed to California April 30, 1864, and lived in San Francisco and Scaramento; he was also for a time in the Sandwich Islands.
He was a very worthy, broad-minded and noble man.”

1850 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Abbot: p. 13 of 17:
Philip S. Lowell, 41, farmer, $1000, born in ME;
Harriet B. Lowell, 41, born in ME;
Elizabeth A. Lowell, 18, born in ME;
Charles W. Lowell, 15, farmer, born in ME;
Abby M. Lowell, 2, born in ME.


1860 Census: ME: Penobscot: Newport, p. 229:
Philip Lowell, 51, house carpenter, born in ME;
Mary, 43, born in ME;
Abby, 14, born in ME;
George Greene, 13, born in ME;
Samuel Greene, 5, born in ME;
Gardner Greene, 5, born in ME;
Sarah Philbrick, 66, born in ME.

1870 Census: CA: Sacramento: San Joaquin, p. 403b:
Lowell, Philip, 60, farmer, $6000, $500, born in ME;
Mary P., 54, keeps house, born in ME;
George, 24, farmer, born in ME;
Sam A., 14, at home, born in ME.

1880 Census: CA: Sacramento: Sacramento, 3rd Wd, p. 19/188c, p 55 of 124 on Genealogy:
Lowell, Phillip, 70, retired carpenter, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Mary, 60, wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Samuel, 23, son, single, keeping their yard, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
plus 3 boarders.

“Philip (8) S. Lowell (Percival (1)) b. in Farmington Me. May 13, 1809, m. July 25, 1831, Harriet Byram Butler, b. Mar. 13, 1809, dau. of Winthrop and Elizabeth (Mayhew) (Simon) Butler of Farmington. Mr. Winthrop Butler was the 6th generation fromn Nicholas Butler, Eastwall, Co. Kent, England 1591. Philip Lowell moved to Abbot, and not satisfied with school facilities for his children, moved to “old Foxcroft”. He was a Democrat in politics, serving in the two branches of the Legislalature several terms. Mr. Lowell owned quite extensively in real estate in Foxcroft, supervised the building of the Congregational Church (present one) and was contractor for the old log dam replaced by the present one of cement. Mrs. Lowell dd. in 1857 and later Mr. Lowell disposed of his Foxcroft property and with his two daughters went to California. Was interested in real estate there and in developments in the Sandwich Islands. He d. at his residence in San Francisco Cal. Oct. 13, 1888.”«s11», «s11», «s14», «s4» 
LOWELL, Hon. Philip Smith (I466)
 
68 "m firstly (before 25 Jan 1185) BEATRICE de Say, daughter and co-heiress of WILLIAM de Say of Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire & his wife --- (-before 19 Apr 1197, bur Chicksand Priory). The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Beatricem” as dauaughter of “Willielmus de Say”, son of “Beatrix de Mandavilla domina de Say, soror Galfridi primi, fundatoris, et amita Willielmi” and adds that she married “domino Galfrido filio Petri”. Through her paternal grandmother, Beatrice de Mandeville, Beatrice was heir to William de Mandeville Earl of Essex. She died in childbirth, presumably giving birth either to her youngest son Henry or to her daughter Maud." Beatrice de Say (I14176)
 
69 "M. in Boston, Mass. No issue. He is a jeweler. Res. Boston, Mass."

LDS birth record lists name as John Peterson Lowell, born on Oct. 19, 1861.

At the time of the 1880 census, is listed as living with mother in Newport, Maine.

Massachusetts Town and Vital Records:
Name: John S Lowell
Event type: Marriage
Birth Date: abt 1862
Marriage Date: 19 Aug 1887
Marriage Place: Boston, Massachusetts
Marriage age: 25
Father Name: William F.
Mother Name: Clara H.
Spouse Name: Mary E. Stevens
Spouse Marriage Age: 35
Spouse Father Name: Moses Deshon
Spouse Mother Name: Ruby Deshon

1900 Census: MA: Suffolk: Boston:
Lowell, John S., head, Oct. 1861, 38, married for 12 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME,, jeweller;
Mary C., wife, Mar 1851, 49, married for 12 years, born in ME, father and mother born in Maine, housekeeping;
Stevens, Annie M., step-daughter, Feb 1880, 20, single, born in MA, father and mother born in ME, at school.

1910 Census: MA: Suffolk: Boston:
Lowell, John S., head, 48, first marriage, married for 23 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, watch ?, own business;
Mary E., wife, 58, second marriage, married for 23 years, has had 1 child, still living, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Anna M., daughter, 29, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, teacher, public school.

Unable to locate 1920 or 1930 census.

Lists name as John Peterson Lowell.,

Obituary: The Boston Globe (Boston, Massachusetts) 12 Dec 1947, Fri.
"John S. Lowell
John S. Lowell, 86, Boston, watchmaker, died yesterday at his home, 4 Rosedale St. Dorchester.
A native of Chesterville, Me., he was associated with the Howard Watch and Clock Compàny, Roxbury, prior to starting his own business 50 years ago. He was a member of Joseph Webb Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Joseph Warren Commandery, Knights Templar of Roxbury, and Putnam Lodge, I. O. O. F.
He leaves a daughter, Anna M. Stevens.
Services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Richardson Chapel, Washington st., Dorchester." 
LOWELL, John Storrer (I296)
 
70 "No issue.
He is a hardware merchant. Res. Idaho Springs, Col."

At the time of the 1880 census, is living with mother in Newport, Maine.

1894 Marriage Record: State of New Jersey
Full Name of Husband: Osroe W. Lowell
Place of Residence: Waltham, Mass.
Age: 27 yrs.
First Marriage
Occupation: Lumber Dealer
Country of Birth: America
Name of Father: William F. Lowell, Country of Birth: America
Maiden Name of Mother: Clara H. Peterson, Country of Birth: America
Full Maiden Name of Wife: Effie R. Griner
Place of Residence: Millville, Cumberland County
Age, nearest birthday: 23
First Marriage
Name of Father: Nicholai Griner, Country of Birth, America
Maiden Name of Mother: Harriett R. Reed, Country of Birth: America
Date of Marriage: Jan. 17th 1894
Marriage Place: Millville City

From "Semi-Centennial History of the State of Colorado", by Jerome Smley, published 1913, p. 147:
"Osroe W. Lowell, who has come to be the leading hardware mer-
chant, doing an extensive business at Idaho Springs, Colorado, is a native
of Farmington, Maine, born August 20, 1866. His parents were Benjamin
Franklin and Clara L. (Peterson) Lowell, both natives of Maine, their an-
cestors settling in 1639 in America and being identified with the early
history of the country. The paternal grandfather took an active part in
the Revolutionary struggle. The father of Osroe W. was a prominent
man of public affairs, having represented his district in the legislature for
a number of terms. He died in 1876. Lowell, Massachusetts, that great
American manufacturing center, was named for one of the ancestors of
this family.

Osroe W. Lowell, attended the high school of Waltham, and the
Bryant & Stratton Business College, at Boston. When eighteen years of
age, he entered the employ of John H. Pray Sons & Co., wholesale dealers
in carpets. He continued with this house ten years and in 1896, came
to Colorado, locating first, at Blackhawk, where he engaged in the hard-
ware trade. In 1898 he removed to Idaho Springs, where he purchased
a hardware stock, which trade he has been connected with ever since. To-
day he is ranked as among the leaders in trade in his city.

Mr. Lowell has served as alderman for Idaho Springs for five years,
last past and has taken much interest in local affairs, and in the support of
the Republican party. He is one of the directors of the Merchants and
Miners National Bank, of Idaho Springs. Among other enterprises with
which he has been identified, since coming to Colorado, may be named his
various mining interests, which have proven quite profitable to him. He is
affiliated with the Elks, Lodge Xo. 607, at Idaho Springs, of which he
was a charter member and has served as treasurer since the date of its
organization, July, 1900. He also holds membership with the Knights
of Pythias and Woodmen of the World. With his brother, B. F. Lowell,
he operates four hardware stores in Colorado Springs and other points.

He was united in marriage in 1894, to Effie Griner, a daughter of
Nicholas Griner, of Millville, New Jersey. One daughter was born of this
union : Martha."


1900 Census: Colorado, Clear Creek County, 12 Precinct West Cliff:
Lowell, Osroe W., head, born Aug 1866, age 33, married for 6 years, born in Maine, father and mother born in Maine, hardware merchant;
Effie R., his wife, born June 1870, age 29, married for 6 years, has no children, born in New Jersey, father and mother born in New Jersey;
Gustafson, Augusta, their servant, born Oct. 1883, age 16, single, born in Colorado, father and mother born in Sweden.

1910 Census: Colorado: Clear Creek; Idaho Springs:
Lowell, O.W., roomer, 45, married for 17 years (?), born in ME, father born in ME, mother born in ?, hardware merchant.

1915 New York State Census: Hempstead, Nassau, New York
King, Harold C., head, 31, born in England, salesman;
Emma Griner, wife, 29. born in U.S., housework;
Edmund Harrison, son, 4, born in the U.S.;
Osroe W. Lowell, brother-in-law, 47, manufacturer of soaps;
Martha Phillip Lowell, niece, 10, born in the U.S., school.

New York, New York Marriage Index:
Name: Osroe W. Lowell
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 26 Nov 1915
Marriage Place: Manhattan, New York, USA
Spouse: Harriette B. Gould
Certificate No. 28452

1920 Census: Colorado, Denver, Denver:
Lowell, Osroe W., head, rents, 45, married, born in ME, father and mother born in US, packing salesman;
Helen, wife, 44, married, born in MA, father born in Norway?, mother born in MA, no occupation.

1930 Census: Colorado: Denver: Denver:
Lowell, Osroe W. head, 57, married, first married at age 25, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, salesman, rubber;
Harriette H, wife, 55, first married at age 20, born in MA, father born in VT, mother born in MA, no occupation.

1930 U.S. Census: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Utah:
Lowell Osroe W., lodger, 57, married, first married at age 22, born in Maine, father and mother born in Maine, salesman, rubber belting;
Harriette, wife, 55, married, first married at age 23, born in Massachusetts, father born in Vermont, mother born in Massachusetts, no occupation.

Denver City Directories for 1922 list wife as "Helen".
Denver City Directories for 1923-1931, 1934-1937 list wife as "Helen H."
Denver City Directory for 1937 lists "Helen H., wid. of Osroe W.)
Denver City Directory for 1932 lists "Harriette H."

"Eisenhardt v. Lowell
Supreme Court of Colorado
January 29, 1940

EISENHARDT
v.
LOWELL.

Error to County Court, City and County of Denver; C. Edgar Kettering, Judge.

Proceeding by Myrtle M. Eisenhardt, as assignee of Effie G. Arnett, against Harriette H. Lowell, as executrix of the estate of O. W. Lowell, also known as Osroe W. Lowell, deceased, to have one-half of certain stock listed as an asset of deceased's estate. To review an unsatisfactory judgment, plaintiff brings error and applies for supersedeas.

Affirmed.

[105 Colo. 419]William A. Bryans and Albert J. Gould, both of Denver, for plaintiff in error.

Miss Mary F. Lathrop and Miss Gunhild I. Ness, both of Denver, for defendant in error.

KNOUS, Justice.

The county court having concluded that the decedent's widow, as survivor of a joint tenancy with her husband therein, was the sole owner of 200 shares of the common stock of The Great Western Sugar Company, denied the petition of plaintiff in error, as a creditor of the deceased husband's estate, which otherwise was insolvent, to have one-half of the said stock listed as an asset thereof. Plaintiff in error seeks a reversal of the judgment below upon the ground that no estate in joint tenancy in the said stock ever was created. Although inferentially suggested by arguments of counsel for plaintiff in error, neither the record nor the nature of the proceeding permits inquiry into, or conclusion upon, the question of whether the genesis of the challenged tenure renders it vulnerable to attack as being fraudulent against creditors. We, therefore, confine our discussion and decision to the single issue submitted.

When the joint tenancy, if there was such, had its inception and the survivorship arose, if ever, there was no statute in Colorado directly pertinent to joint tenancies in corporate stocks. Subsequently to the happening of these alleged events the general assembly enacted, and the governor approved, laws relating to joint tenancies in personal property of the type involved in this proceeding, chapter 186, S.L.1937; chapter 87, S.L.1939, under the terms of which there could be little room to question the validity of the joint tenancy here asserted. Notwithstanding and without considering [105 Colo. 420] the retroactive effect of these statutes to joint tenancies existing at the time of their enactment, it seems certain that in no event can they have application to a situation where, as here, the alleged survivorship already had occurred at the time of their passage. 33 C.J. p. 902. As analogously pertinent, see 14 Am.Jur. p. 85, § 13. However, and notwithstanding the presumption against joint estates, it is well settled in Colorado that independently of statutory authorization, joint tenancies, with the incident of survivorship, may obtain as to personal property. Miller v. American Bank & Trust Co., 71 Colo. 346, 206 P. 796. This is the general rule in practically all jurisdictions. 14 Am.Jur. p. 81, § 10; 33 C.J. p. 906, § 8.

The certificates in question recite that Harriette H. Lowell, (the widow) and Osroe W. Lowell (her deceased husband) 'as joint tenants with right of survivorship and not as tenants in common' are the owners of the stock represented thereby. These quoted words, meeting, as they do, even the strict requirements of our statute relating to the creation of a joint tenancy in real estate, '35 C. S. A. c. 40, § 4, adopted as the technical criterion of sufficiency
as relating to both real and personal property in Estate of Kwatkowski, 94 Colo. 222, 29 P.2d 639, amply proclaim a joint tenancy and upon their face the certificates must be considered as accomplishing that result. While tacitly recognizing this situation, the plaintiff in error contends that here the evidence discloses certain deficiencies and obstacles which legally preclude the creation or existence of the joint tenancy. The record discloses that in 1928 The Great Western Sugar Company issued two certificates each for 100 shares of its common capital stock to Osroe W. Lowell individually. There is nothing in the record suggesting that this stock was purchased by Mr. Lowell other than with his own funds. Early in the month of December, 1936, at his home, Mr. Lowell, who was in poor health, requested Mr. Ralph E. Smith, sales manager for Earl M. Scanlon & Company, dealers in investment[105 Colo. 421] securities, with whom he was well acquainted, to effect a transfer of the stock in question to Mr. and Mrs. Lowell as joint tenants. Mr. Lowell then affixed his signature, the genuineness of which is not challenged, to the blank assignments appearing on the reverse of the certificates and delivered them to Mr. Smith, who carried them to his office and there requested another employee of the company to attend to the details of the projected transfer. The latter employee, in the name of Earl M. Scanlon & Company, by appropriate endorsement guaranteed the signature of Mr. Lowell on the assignments and transmitted the certificates to The Great Western Sugar Company with written request for transfer to Mr. and Mrs. Lowell in joint tenancy. The official of the latter company in charge of its stock transfers inserted in the blanks of the printed assignment the names of Mr. and Mrs. Lowell as transferees, the number of shares, the date, added his name and another in the power of attorney clause and following the name of the transferees stamped the words 'as joint tenants with right of survivorship and not as tenants in common.' The new certificates then were issued in this form and returned to Scanlon & Company. Thereafter Mr. Smith delivered the new joint tenancy certificates to Mr. Lowell at his home, at which time the latter signed a receipt therefor. Mr. Lowell died in April, 1937, and after his death the joint tenancy certificates were found in his safety deposit box. Mrs. Lowell was not present at the time of the conversation between her husband and Mr. Smith and the record contains no intimation that she knew of the questioned transaction until after his death.

As procedurally precluding the creation of a joint tenancy the plaintiff in error relies upon the circumstances that when Mr. Lowell affixed his signature to the assignments, the blanks therein were not filled in and that neither the clerk guaranteeing his signature thereon nor the agent making the transfer saw him sign or knew that he had, nor had either personal directions [105 Colo. 422] from his as to the identity of the transferees or the tenure by which they were to hold. No authorities are cited in support of this theory. If it be considered, as plaintiff in error assumes, that the joint tenancy depended upon the sufficiency of the assignments and the transfer of the original certificates, the contention is without merit. Whatever the infirmities, if any there were, in the complex machinery of accomplishment, the result, as evidenced by the new certificates delivered to Mr. Lowell, was in precise accord with his initially expressed intention and his action in accepting, receipting for and retaining them amounted to a ratification of the acts of the various agents engaged in the process. If, on the other hand, where, as here, there is no evidence of fraud, undue influence or mental deficiency, the unequivocal declarations of the new certificates are taken as prima facie disclosing the apparent intention of Mr. Lowell to create a joint estate and the formalities attendant to the transfer of the old certificates are viewed as being identical, the same result is attained, since no proof was offered rebutting this expressed intent although, no statute precluding, evidence with relation thereto would be admissible. Houle v. McMillan, 83 Colo. 216, 263 P. 409.

Plaintiff in error next asserts, and this without reference to intent to create, that the alleged joint tenure must fail because there was no delivery to Mrs. Lowell of the new certificates which, after their issuance and until her husband's death, appear to have remained in his possession.

In the field of reported cases those most analogous to the proceeding Before us relate to questions of survivorship in bank deposits in the name of a deceased depositor and another. These cases, multitudinous in number and diverse as to conclusion, are assembled and expertly commented upon in annotations in L.R.A.1917C, 550; Annotated Cases, 1916D, 520, and 48 A.L.R. 189. In cases where, as here, the personalty in question originally[105 Colo. 423] belonged to the decedent, and there is no claim of a valuable consideration for the creation of the alleged joint estate, some courts regard the right of the survivor to the property to be established if there was a clear intent to create a condition embracing the essential elements of a joint estate. Typical of this line of authorities are: Erwin v. Felter, 283 Ill. 36, 119 N.E. 926, L.R.A.1918E, 776; Chippendale v. North Adams Savings Bank, 222 Mass. 499, 111 N.E. 371; New Jersey Title G. & T. Co. v. Archibald, 91 N.J.Eq. 82, 108 A. 434; Deal's Adm'r v. Merchants' & Mechanics Savings Bank, 120 Va. 297, 91 S.E. 135, L.R.A.1917C, 548. Generally, the courts have held that the title of the survivor must rest upon a gift or trust. In First Nat. Bank v. Mulich, 83 Colo. 518, 266 P. 1110, a joint tenancy in a bank deposit with right of survivorship was sustained on the premise of a gift in praesenti though enjoyment by the donee was postponed. In that case, as here, the alleged donor in the first instance was the sole owner of the personalty involved; also analogously the claimed joint tenancy was created by the sole act of the donor without the payment of valuable consideration by the donee beneficiary. There it was held that the donor's use of the word 'joint' in the following written directions to the bank: 'I hereby request that my checking account be made joint with my brother * * * for him to check on only in case of my death,' established that the transfer of a present interest was intended and that the rest of the writing sufficiently proclaimed a joint tenancy. In the case at bar Mr. Lowell's intent to so create was unequivocally apparent and there can be no doubt that the new certificates by their terms disclosed a present vested interest in the stock in Mrs. Lowell even though the right of enjoyment to the whole thereof was postponed. In the Mulich case delivery of the writing to the bank was declared to be a good delivery. By this criterion, independently of the added factor of receipt by Mr. Lowell, as a joint tenant, the lodging with The Great Western [105 Colo. 424] Sugar Company of the old certificates endorsed as they were, and the request for the new in joint tenancy form and their issuance so, constituted a sufficient delivery to sustain the gift. As relating to the effect of the receipt of the securities by Mr. Lowell it may be observed that in the well considered case of Estate of Staver, 218 Wis. 114, 260 N.W. 655, it was held that delivery to a depositor of deposit certificates payable to depositor and a third person jointly, created legal ownership in both of such joint payees directly and further delivery of the certificates to such third person was unnecessary to entitle him thereto by right of survivorship. This case was followed and the same rule applied as to securities in Central Wisconsin Trust Co. v. Schumacher, 230 Wis. 591, 284 N.W. 562. Proceeding upon a somewhat similar theory the Supreme Court of Utah in Holt v. Bayles, 85 Utah 364, 39 P.2d 715, held that the delivery of a bank pass book evidencing a joint tenancy to one of the joint depositors, constituted delivery to both. Obviously, the delivery having been sufficient, possession thereafter was of minor consequence. If not a proper matter of presumption from the fact of benefit without burden, the assent of, and acceptance by, the donee through her conduct appears as clearly here as in the Mulich case. We must therefore conclude that plaintiff in error's objections grounded upon the alleged lack of delivery and subsequent possession must be resolved against her in view of our pronouncements in the above discussed case of First Nat. Bank v. Mulich, supra. As to these points, the same result would attain if the theory of contract for benefit of third party, approved as the alternative ground for affirmance in the Mulich case, be applied in the case at bar.

Upon the assumption that a joint tenancy cannot be created by a conveyance by the owner of the property to himself and another, plaintiff in error finally contends that such tenure could not result here. As previously stated the joint tenancy in the case at bar had [105 Colo. 425] for its basis a valid gift inter vivos as well as the contract evidenced by the new certificates under which The Great Western Sugar Company became obligated to the extent thereby disclosed to both donor and donee and the survivorship did not rest upon conveyance or transfer. Even in the latter class of cases there is a sharp difference of opinion as to whether a joint tenancy can be created by grant by an owner to himself and another. 'One view is that unity of title and unity of time are lacking in the estate created in the two grantees and
therefore a tenancy in common results. Other cases, however, take the view that a joint estate may be thus created where the intention to create is clear.' 14 Am.Jur. p. 83, § 11. Cases on this subject are collected in an annotation in 62 A.L.R., page 514. Failing to perceive any particular necessity for circuitous conveyance through a dummy from the owner to the intended joint tenants, we are inclined to favor the latter view, although, since it is unnecessary to a determination of the question here presented, we do not expressly so hold.

We have carefully examined the other errors assigned, particularly those said to have arisen in connection with the degree of credibility to be accorded the testimony of one of the witnesses for Mrs. Lowell, and are satisfied that they are without merit. No helpful purpose would be served by their discussion.

The judgment is affirmed."

No SSDI record located.

U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007
Name: Osroe Warren Lowell
SSN: 149105684
Gender: Male
Race: While
Birth Date: 20 Aug 1872
Birth Place: Cheetville [sic], Maine
Father Name: William F. Lowell
Mother Name: Clara Peterson
Type of Claim: Original SSN
Notes: 17 Nov 1983: Name listed as OSROE WARREN LOWELL

From the Denver Post, Tuesday, 20 Apr 1937:
"LOWELL--
Osroe W. Lowell, late of 1896 S. Clarkson; beloved husband of Helen Lowell; uncle of J. R. Lowell of Colorado Springs. Services from the Hazard mortuary Thursday, 2 p.m. Private cremation."

From the Rocky Mountain News, Wednesday, 21 Apr 1937:
"LOWELL --
Osroe W. Lowell, late of 1896 S. Clarkson; beloved husband of Helen Lowell; uncle of J. R. Lowell of Colorado Springs. Services from the Hazared Mortuary Thursday, 2 p.m. Private cremation." 
LOWELL, Osroe Warren (I294)
 
71 "No issue. He was a captain in the War of 1812. Res. Farmington, Franklin, Maine."

1850 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington:
Ebenr Childs, 61, Farmer, $2500, Massachusetts;
Phebe, 51, born in Mass.;
[male name illegible] 12;
James U., 9.

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington:
Eben. Child, 71, Gentleman, $3500, $500, born in Massachusetts;
Mary B., 68, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington:
Childs, Ebenezer, 82, retired merchant, $300, $300, born in Massachusetts;
Mary B., 76, keeping house, $600, born in ME.

Marriages in Franklin County:
Capt. Eben’r Childs-Farmington
Mary Bullen - New Sharon
Feb. 25, 1855

Eben Capt. Childs - Farmington
Pede Johnson - Waterville
Mar. 2, 1835

LDS Record:
Ebenezer Childs m. Hannah Lowell
5 Jul 1810

From Vermont Chronicle (Bellows Falls, Vermont) 28 Dec 1872, Sat.
Under New England Items-Maine:
"Captain Ebenezer Childs of Farmington has drawn a pension regularly for more than half a century, drawing a sum total of $13,380 of pension money, or more than any other five pensioners on the roll at Augusta." 
CHILDS, Captain Ebenezer (I572)
 
72 "No issue. Res. Boston, Mass."

1860 Census for father James Madison Lowell does not list Nellie.

1870 Census for James Lowell [CA: Sierra: Gibson Twnp.] lists Nelly, age 11, at school.

Massachusetts Vital Records: Marriages:
3 Dec 1878, Fred A. Howard, Easton, 25, wheelwright, born in Easton, parents: Frank & Augusta (Simpson), first marriage;
Nellie W. Lowell, E. Bridgewater, 19, born in California, parents: James & Ruth, first marriage.«s4» 
LOWELL, Nellie Whitman (I648)
 
73 "No issue. When 18 years old he bought his time of his father, and with "pack on his back went out."
He began studying law with the Hon. Nathan Cutler 1822, and afterwards studied with Hon. John Ruggles, Hon. John Dickinson, and Hon. Isaac McConihe of Troy, N.Y., and was admitted to the bar at East Machias, Washington, Maine. Sept., 1826; was admitted to U.S. Circuit Court 1836, and in 1840 to U.S. Supreme Court at Washington, D.C. He settled in practice at East Machias, Washington, Maine.
He was a member of the U.S. Congress in 1839-43, from East Maine, and in this body took high rank as a debater and a stateman.
In 1831, 1832, 1835 and 1837, he was a member of the Maine Legislature as a Democrat, in all of which he took a prominent part.
He was for a long time a leading member of the Washington Co. bar, and one of the best in his State.
He was also a scientific farmer, devoting all his spare time to his farm."

From the Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) August 11, 1838:
“In the last Northern Statesman, which by the way is an efficient laborer in the Whig cause, was a well written article on the respective claims of the two candidates for Congress in that district, Hon. J. O. Noyes and Joshua A. Lowell, Esq. After alluding to the delicate situation in which the editor is placed, (the opposing candidate being a brother of his,) and the important position which he sustains to the public, he says, ‘we should despise ourselves if we conceived it possible for us to be drawn, by personal feelings, aside from the path of public duty in such an interesting crisis as the present.’
“The Statesman then goes on to say that ‘no man in the Eastern part of the State, has done more than this same Joshua A. Lowell, to build up, and to give efficiency to that most extraordinary party the Locofoco, destructive, alas the pure, double refined ‘democratic party’ of modern times. The editor then proceeds to give a brief but correct description of this locofoco party. He then takes up the letter of Joshua A. Lowell, Esq. in which he avows his determination to go the ‘whole figure’ for the sub treasury and against a bank in any shape, and shows conclusively that a man supporting the doctrines which he avows is not fit to represent the interests of that district. The editor concludes the article thus:
‘There is no political opponent that we would sooner see in Congress than Mr. Lowell, but most sincerely believing from his past political course and his recent avowal, that if elected, he would support measures which we deem most disasterous to the country, we could not conscientiously remain silent and see a man of such political principles elevated to a high and responsible office without raising our warning voice against it. We can truly say in the language of another, ‘It is not that love Caesar less, but Rome more.’
“The Statesman pays a deserved compliment to Mr. Noyes, as a man every way qualified to represent the interests of his constituents, being an experienced practical merchant, and fully acquainted with the wants of a commercial district like his.”

1830 Census: ME: Washington, E. Machias: p. 254:
Joshua A. Lowell:
1 -20-30 M
1 30-40 M
1 10-15 F
1 20-30 F

1840 Census: ME: Washington: Mechisses
Joshua A. Lowell:
1 30-40 M
1 5-10 F
2 10-15 F
1 20-30 F
1 30-40 F

1850 Census: ME: Washington, E. Machias: p. 43 of 46:
Joshua A. Lowell, 49, lawyer, born in ME;
Miranda T., 47, born in ME;
John J. Lowell, 18, student, born in New Brunswick;
Archibald, 9, born in New Brunswick;
Mary F. Lowell, 15, born in ME;
Mary Kingsley, 15, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Washington, E. Machias, p. 44 of 55:
Joshua A. Lowell, 59, counsellor at law, $15,000, $5,000, born in ME;
Miranda T., 56, born in ME;
Mary F., 24, born in ME;
Archibald C., 19, sailor, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Washington, E. Mathias, p. 23 of 52:
Lowell, Joshua A., 69, lawyer, $4000, $2000, born in ME;
Miranda T., 67, keeping house, born in ME;
Mary F., 34, born in ME.

Joshua Adams Lowell: Speech of Mr. Lowell of Maine, on the Independent Treasury Bill, in the House of Representatives, May 27th and 28th, 1840--In Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, on the bill to provide for the collection, safekeeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue. 15 pp. Held at the Maine Historical Society.

Joshua Adams Lowell: At a Union Meeting in East Machias, Maine, February 15, 1861. On motion of Gen. Foster, Hon. M. J. Talbot was chosen President, who, on taking the chair, addressed the meeting in an appropriate and pattriotic manner; and, by his invitation, Rev. C. H. Ellis, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, implored the Divine blessing upon the meeting and upon the country. Hon. J. A. Lowell then addressed the meeting. 16 pp. Held at the Maine Historical Society. 
LOWELL, Joshua Adam (I556)
 
74 "On his tombstone in the Union Cemetery, Amesbury, Mass., is the following--
In memory of
Mr. Lewis Lowell
who died June 13th 1777
in the 50th year
of his age.
All you that now alive may be,
Prepare to die and follow me.
By harkning to Gods gracious voice
And make the lord your only choice."

"He lived in Amesbury, Mass., and was a 'boat builder'."«s4», «s4» 
LOWELL, Lewis (I376)
 
75 "PIERRE de Joinville (-before 8 Jun 1292). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Petro de Genyvile" as brother of "Gaufrido Genyvile", son and heir of "Gaufrido de Genyvyle" and his wife "Matilda Lacy". An order dated 16 Jan 1283 records "recognizance by Geofferey de Geneville, Matilda his wife and Peter their eldest son" to "William de Valence" for the commission of lands of “Maurice FitzGerald in Ireland, deceased” and for the marriage of “Gerald son and heir of the said Maurice, under age, and in custody of the said William”. Of Ludlow Shropshire and Walterstone co Hereford. Lord of Stanton Lacy. m (after 1280) as her second husband, JEANNE de Lusignan, widow of BERNARD AIZ [IV] Seigneur d'Albret, daughter of HUGUES [XIII] Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême, Seigneur de Lusignan & his wife Jeanne de Fougères (-before 18 Apr 1323, bur Abbaye de Valence). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that "Petro de Genyvile" married "Johannam filiam --- comitis Marchiæ". The primary source which confirms her first marriage has not yet been identified. She and her sister Isabelle, as joint heiresses of the county of la Marche, agreed in May 1309 to transfer the county to Philippe IV "le Bel" King of France, when it was united with the royal domains. Philippe IV King of France granted "castra…de Choec et de Payrac" to "Johanne de Marchia, sorori germane Guidonis quondam comitis Marchie et Engolisme", by charter dated Aug 1310, which names "Guidonis de Marchia, patrui ipsius Johanne". The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that "Petro de Genyvile" married "Johannam filiam --- comitis Marchiæ". Pierre & his wife had three children." DE JOINVILLE, Sir Pierre of Trim and Ludlow Castle (I20486)
 
76 "Res. Sonoma, Cal."

1880 Census: lives with her parents, listed as “Mabel” age 1;
1900 Census: lives with her parents, listed as “Lilly Mabele” born in 1879.«s4» 
LOWELL, Mabel (I618)
 
77 "Roger William Williams, Sr. passed away on Thursday, October 25, 2018 due to complications from a fall. He was born in Canton, Ohio on July 27, 1932. He graduated from Lincoln HS in 1950 after which he attended Wittenberg University. In 1951, he enlisted in the US Coast Guard and served until 1953. He married Beverly Joan Miller in January 1953 while serving. After his service he graduated from Kent State University. He worked in senior management positions at Danner Press and Hercules Engines from which he retired. He was active with the Boy Scouts, Lions and Eagles. He is survived by his wife of 65 years and his three sons Roger Jr, Steven (Jeanette) and Craig (Lori). He leaves several grandchildren.
In honoring his wishes, Roger will be cremated and memorial visitation will be held on Saturday November 10, 2018 from 1-2 pm at the Reed Funeral Home North Canton Chapel, 801 Pittsburg Ave. NW." 
WILLIAMS, Roger W. Sr. (I22059)
 
78 "She and sister, Abbie Maria, went to California with their father 1864. They res. at West Side, Cal.”

1900 Census: CA: Santa Clara: Santa Clara Twp:
Elizabeth A. Nichols, May 1832, 68, wid., has had 1 child still living, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, housekeeper;
Charles, son, March 1866, 33, married for 7 years, farmer;
Viola, daugher in law, Dec 1855, 45, has been married 7 years, has not had any children, housekeeper.«s4» 
LOWELL, Elizabeth Augusta (I476)
 
79 "She is a fine musician and before m. was an organist in new York City."

California Death Rec:
Augusta Lowell Garthwaite
b. 26 Feb 1857 in California
d. 13 Feb 1948 in Madera Cty«s4» 
LOWELL, Augusta Maria (I638)
 
80 "She removed to California with her father in 1864. She is a woman of unusual business and executive ability. She res. in Berkeley, Cal."

Obituary:San Francisco Chronicle: 20 Jul 1902, Sun:
MIKKLESON- In Berkeley, July 19, Abbie M., beloved wife of Robert Mikkleson, mother of Mrs. H. M. Trask and Mrs. E. T. Wagner, and sister of Mrs. E. A. Nichols of Lawrence, Cal., formerly widow of Dr. J. B. Trask of San Francisco, a native of Foxcroft, Me., aged 55 years and 26 days.
Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend the funeral Monday, July 21, at 2 o'clock, from the larlows of A. W. Martin & Co., 319 O'Farrell Street. Interment, Laurel Hill Cemetery."

[NOTE: Abbie Lowell Trask Mikkleson was originally interred in Laurel Hill Cemetery, a cemetery in San Francisco, California. In 1892, the cemetery was forced out of San Francisco and the thirty five thousand buried at Laurel Hill were moved to Cypress Lawn in Colma. In doing so, San Francisco relinquished a part of its own history for those buried at Laurel Hill during the second half of the nieteenth century, beginning in 1854, were true pioneers of the early West and although some had been moved individually by their families earlier, most were ultimately buried in vaults under a grass-covered mound that bears a memorial to their achievements. In June of 1901 an unknown number of bodies from Laurel Hill were moved to the Japanese Cemetery in Colma. In 1901 an unknown number of bodies were moved from Laurel Hill Cemetery in San Francisco were moved to the Serbian Cemetery in Colma. Final and complete removal of all remains at San Francisco's Laurel Hill Cemetery began in 1939. Not known what happened to Abbie Mikkleson's remains." 
LOWELL, Abbie Maria (I471)
 
81 "She settled in Portland, Cumberland, Maine., where she now res."

In 1860, she lived with her sister, Harriet J., and brother-in-law, Henry C. Starr in Canton, Massachusetts.

In 1870, she lived with her brother, William F. Lowell, and his family in Chesterville, Maine, along with her mother.

Listed in the 1889, 1890, and 1891 Portland, Maine city directories as “Hannah E. Phillips, widow of Warren”, residing at 13 Smith.

Does not appear in the 1915 Portland City Directory.

1900 Census: Maine: Cumberland: Portland:
Phillips, Hannah E., head, born Jun 1836, 64, wid (?), born in ME, father and mother born in ME.

Maine Death Record:
Hannah E. Phillips
Date of Death: 14 Apr 1907
Age: Years, 75; Months, 0; Days, 27
Place of Birth: Chesterville, ME
Widowed
Name of Father: Samuel Lowell
Maiden Name of Mother: Hannah Lowell
Birthplace of Father: Centerville, ME
Birthplace of Mother: Wilton, ME
Occupation of Father: Farmer
Widow of Warren Phillips 
LOWELL, Hannah Elizabeth (I286)
 
82 "She was born in New Bedford, Mass., and was reared there."

Lists birthdate as Apr. 25, 1767.«s16», «s4» 
HEATH, Elizabeth “Betsy” (I310)
 
83 "She was educated at Dover-Foxcroft, Piscataquis, Maine. Academy, Nichols Latin School at Lewiston, Me., and was grad. by Mt. Holyoke College in 1886, and later with the highest honors of her class from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Boston, Mass.
Immediately after graduation she was appointed House Surgeon of a New York Hospital, and was called from there to the medical staff of the Maine Insane Hospital, being the first woman on the staff.
After five years there, in 1891 she was called to Mt. Holyoke College, her Alma Mater to become resident physician and lecturer in physiology, which position she still holds.
So far as I have been able to ascertain she is the first Lowell woman to grad. at a college.
Res. Mt. Holyoke Col., So. Hadley, Mass."

Lived with her mother’s sister, Emily Chandler Hale, and her family during the time of the 1870 and 1880 census.

1870 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Foxcroft:
Hale, Elias J., 48, manufacturing and lawyer, judge of probate, born in ME;
Emily C., 38, keeping house; born in ME;
Lowell, Mary C., 7, born in ME;
Hale, Leonard, T, 15, attending school, $1500, $1500, born in ME.

1880 Census:
Hale, Elias J. 58, judge of probate, born in ME, father born in CT, mother born in MA;
Emily C., 47, wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Lowell, Mary, 17, niece, student, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.

From “One Hundred Year Biographical Directory of Mount Holyoke College 1837-1937, Bulletin Series 30, no. 5;p published and complied by the Alumnae Association of Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts:

Mary Chandler Lowell x1885
Address in 1937: 30 Main St. West Dover-Foxcroft, ME
MD 1886 College of Physicians and Surgeons
LLB and JB 1902 Boston University
JM 1903 Boston University
Student 1899-1900 Cornell University
Student 1884-1886
City Missionary, Boston
Assistant Superintendent 1886-1891 Maine Insane Hospital Augusta, ME
Physician and Instructor (physiology) 1891-1899 Mount Holyoke College
Lawyer 1904-1910
Research worker
Auther.

1900 Census: ME: Piscataquis: Dover-Foxcroft, p. 283:
Lowell, Mary, boarder, born June 1859, age 40, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, physician.

1910 Census: MA: Suffolk: Boston, p. 107A:
Lowell, Mary C., age 45, single, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, physician, general practice.

“Mary (10) Chandler Lowell, b. in Foxroft Me. Jan. 18, 1863, only child of Col. Charles Winthrop and Mary Ester (Chandler) Lowell. Educated at home--a few terms in the public schools; then College and University--Degrees M.D. LL.B J.D. J.M. A very active and full professional life.”

Unable to locate census records beyond 1910.

Portland Press Hearld: Tuesday, June 28, 1949:

“Dr. Mary Chandler Lowell Dies in Bangor Hospital--One of State’s Most Brilliant Women, Was First on Augusta Hospital Hospital Staff
Bangor June 27 (AP) Dr. Mary Chandler Lowell, 86, one of Maine’s most brilliant women died Sunday night in a Bangor hospital following a long illness. She was retired resident physican and instructor in physiology at Mount Holyoke College.
She was born at Foxcroft Jan. 18, 1863, the only child of Col. Charles Winthrop and Mary Esther Chandler Lowell. She began her education in the public schools entering Mount Holyoke in 1880 which school she attended for two years. She received her degree of M.D. in 1896 after three years at Boston College of Physicians and Surgeons, later spending several months in Vienna. She then studied a year at Cornell University Law School, Ithaca, N.Y., receiving her LLB and after three years at Boston University, law and jurisprudence degrees of J.D. and J. M.
She had the unique record of being the first woman student admitted to a surgical clinic in Boston and as the first woman added (by legislative authority) to the staff of the State insane hospital at Augusta.
As far as is known, Doctor Lowell is the only person to have not only regular degrees in medicine and law but also that of master of jurisprudence. Law had been the profession of her father and her grandfather for many years and she fitted herself to trace titles and do historical and genealogical research, several of them bearing evidence of her diligence.
She was the author of Genealogy of Chandler-Parsons and Allied Families 1912, History of Old Foxcroft; Ready Reference Directory of Piscataquis County; Monograph: Laws Governing Property of Married Women in Massachusetts, 1903: Medical Education of Women, 1910; Value of Genealogical Research Work as a Pasttime, 1912.
She was a member of Maine Medical Association, Massachusetts Bar Association, Women’s Lawyer’s Club, Portia Club and Phi Sigma international sciencitic club. She traveled much in the United States and Canada, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. She visited many hospitals and insane asylums in Europe.
Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Lary Funeral Home, Summer Street, Dover-Foxcroft.
Cremation will take place in Boston before burial in Rural Grove Cemetery, Dover-Foxcroft.”«s14», «s4» 
LOWELL, Mary Chandler (I474)
 
84 "She was sister of Lucius, who m. Hannah Lowell, dau. of Joshua B. Lowell, of Chesterville, Franklin, Maine."

Lists birthdate as Feb. 13, 1803 and birthplace as Middletown, Massachusetts.«s17», «s4» 
MORRISON, Chloe P. (I406)
 
85 "So I want to tell you something about Nancy's visit to Fulda and the Rhön - area. We made our first stop in Wendershausen and met with the mayor Waldemar Leubecher, whom I called the day before by phone for making a date. He was very excited, because he didn't know that one Leubecher emigrated to the USA. Waldemar fetched his genealogical table and we found out that he is somehow related to Nancy (3rd Cousin). Waldemar had a picture of Nikolaus Leubecher (born 1799) the father of Georg Leubecher and one of his sons who must be a brother of Georg Leubecher. The picture was made on the end of the 19th century, so Nikolaus was over 90 years old when it was made. Waldemar gave the picture to Nancy and I think she was very excited. With Waldermar's informations it was easy to find the house where Georg, Ida, Bertha and Katharina Leubecher were born. Nancy and Steve made a lot of pictures. I hope they will send you some." LEUBECHER, Nikolaus (I17736)
 
86 "Son of Israel W. and Zebiah W. Johnson of Carmel, Me."
"No. issue. He is a merchant. Res. Carmel, Me."

1900 Census: Maine: Penobscot: Carmel, ED#89:
Johnson, Camillus, head, born Dec. 1845, age 54, married for 15 years, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, general store;
Clara E., his wife, born May 1859, age 41, married 15 years, no children, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.

1910 and 1920 census list same information as above (with appropriate ages).

No 1930 census rec found in Carmel for the Johnsons.

Carmel Marriages:
[Groom] C. K. Johnson of Carmel, age 37, Merchant, son of I.W. & Z. W. Grant
[Bride] Ellie C. Lowell of Waltham, Mass. age 25, dau. of W. F. & Clara H. Lowell
Ent. Aug. 2, 1884, Ctf. Aug. 8, 1884

Front of cemetery headstone reads:
JOHNSON
CAMILLUS K. JOHNSON
1845-1922
His Wife
Clara E. Lowell
1859-

Verso of cemetery headstone reads:
J. G. Johnson
1848-1920
Evelyn H. Johnson
1848-1922
Isa Wood Johnson
1860-1934
Wife of
Charles H. Parsons
1870-1940 
JOHNSON, Camillus Kidder (I297)
 
87 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MARTIN, Susan (I17541)
 
88 "The following is the inscription on her tombstone--
HERE LYES BURIED
the BODY OF mRS
MaRY LOWLe the
WIFe of Mr GIDEon
LOWLe WHO DIED
nOUEmBER THE 27th
1734 & In the 63
YEAR OF HER AGE"«s4» 
SWETT, Miriam "Mary" (I317)
 
89 "The following was probably this Gideon--
Gideon Lowle served in Col. Williard's Regt. in the French and Indian War. Was employed 9 days constructing a bateau. (His. Amesbury, Mass. p.228 [])
Like his ancestors he was a "mariner," and lived in Amesbury, Mass. He was mentioned in his father's will, but not among the b.
His will is dated July 29, 1756, witnessed by David Currier, Lewis Lowell, and Enoch Blaisdell. (Essex Co. Prob. Rec., 34; 169).
"[1773] In portions of Amesbury and Salisbury on the 14th of August occurred one of the most violent tornadoes ever known in this vicinity. Although not lasting more than three minutes, it damaged or entirely prostrated about two hundred buildings. It swept along about a quarter of a mile in width and a mile and a half in length near the river. The damage at the Ferry was... Gideon Lowell's house wrecked and unroofed and barn blown down..."«s4», «s7», «s7» 
LOWELL, Gideon (I353)
 
90 "They removed to Faribault, Minn., then to Pipe Stone, Minn., where he was a merchant until 1876, since which time he has been engaged in farming."

1850 Census: ME: Lincoln: Rockland, p. 105 of 121:
Reuben K. Lowell, age 23, merchant, born in ME;
Nancy F. Lowell, age 24, born in ME.

1860 Census: MN: Rice: Walcott Twp:
Reuben H. Lowell, 31, farmer, $600 personal, born in ME;
Nancy, 31, born in ME;
Willie H., 10, born in ME.

1870 Census: MN: Rice: Rairbault: p. 360:
Lowell, Reuben H., 42, clerk in store, born in ME;
Nancy A., 40, keeping house, born in MA.

1880 Census: MN: Pipestone: Troy:
Lowell, Reuben H, 52, married, farmer, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.

Minnesota Cemetery Inscription Index:
Reuben H. Lowell
Death Date: 03/Dec/1884
Comments: Age 57 yrs. Par. Judge H. C. & Mercy Lowell. Died Pipestone County, MN.«s4» 
LOWELL, Reuben H. (I541)
 
91 "They res. Farmington, Franklin, Maine."«s4» LOWELL, Elizabeth Heath (I654)
 
92 "They settled for a time in Farmington, Franklin, Maine., then res. at Oakland, Cal." and

1850 Census lists occupation as “Student.”

1880 Census: CA: Alameda: Oakland, Dist. 8, Ward 3:
Lowell, N. R., age 50, born in ME;
L. A., age 50, his wife, keeping house, born in Mass;
S. L., age 18, their daughter, at schools, born in CA;
Anna L., age 16, their daughter, at schools, born in CA.

1900 Census: Nathan Lowell, born Apr 1830, age 70, widowed, father-in-law, born in ME, father and mother born in ME, living with Salo L. and John Beckwith, his daughter and son-in-law.,

Obituary, appearing in the San Francisco Call, Volume 87, No. 27, December 27, 1900:
"Pioneer Warehouseman Passes Quietly Away. After a lingering Illness Nathan R. Lowell Is Called to His Final Rest. Oakland, Dec. 26. — Nathan R. Lowell, a pioneer warehouseman of San Francisco, died to-day after months of illness, at his residence, 541 Twenty-ninth street. The deceased was the father of Mrs. John A. Beckwith of this city. He was a native of Maine, 71 years of age. Oakland had been Mr. Lowell's home for thirty five years. The funeral will be held Friday from the late residence. The interment will be at Mountain View Cemetery." 
LOWELL, Nathan Reuben (I629)
 
93 "They settled in 1866 in Yankee Jims, Cal, where they now reside."«s4» LOWELL, Mary F. (I459)
 
94 "They settled in Farmington, Franklin, Maine., on a farm adjoining his father's.
"He was a wheelwright as well as a farmer."

"Joshua Bartlett Lowell settled on a farm adjoining that of his father. He was a mechanic as well as a farmer, having the trade of wheelwright. "

lists death date as Nov. 1, 1884

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, p. 591:
Joshua Lowell, age 55, farmer, $12000, $1500, born in ME;
Hannah C. Lowell, age 42, born in ME;
Jophanus J., age 16, farm laborer, born in ME;
George M., age 9, born in ME;
Hannah E., age 8, born in ME;
Charles, age 7, born in ME;
Jessie S., age 4, born in ME;
Marthe A., age 36, born in ME.

1870 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, p. 7 of 83:
Lowell, Joshua B., age 65, farmer, real estate valued at $3500, personal property valued at $1200, born in ME;
Hannah C., age 52, keeping house, born in ME;
George M., age 19, farm laborer, born in ME;
Emily W., age 18, at school, born in ME;
Charles, age 17, farm laborer, born in ME;
Jesse S., age 14, farm laborer, born in ME;
Martha A., age 46, domestic servant, born in ME.

1880 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington, pg. 18: 432B:
Lowell, Joshua B., age 75, carpenter’s ?, kidney trouble, born in ME, father born in NH, mother born in ME;
Hannah C., age 62, his wife, keeping house, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
J. Sumner, age 24, their son, farmer, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Charles, age 27, their son, farmer, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.«s11», «s11», «s4» 
LOWELL, Joshua Bartlett (I405)
 
95 "Two years after moving to a farm just east of her parents (in 1909), Ida was killed by lightning as she was upstairs tucking her three small children into an iron bed.

"Came with parents to the U.S. in 1883."

"I remember two things about my Mother. We used to have a well that was right outside the kitchen door that used to have a platform around it. I remember sitting on the platform washing radishes from the garden. She used to tell me what a good girl I was. I remember another incident when it was Easter time. My mother's sister who lived in Oklahoma always used to send me a card for birthday or Easter or Christmas. I still have that Easter card in my little trunk upstairs. I can remember standing with my Mother out there waiting for the mailman and that was when the card came. And I can remember the night when she was killed. I remember My dad putting the three of us, he had to go to the neighbor about a quarter of a mile away to telephone because our telephone was out. When going up there in this storm he put the three of us in a big chair and threw a quilt over the three of us so that we couldn't see the lighting or hear anything until he got back. TThen he took us up to this neightbor to spend the night and the next day they took us over to Grandma's and as we went by our place I can still see this woman out of the backdoor throwing the dishwater out the back porch. I can remember crying at the funeral, why they were putting her there. I can remember somebody taking me away. All three of us kids were in one bed upstairs in the one bedroom and Dad and Mom slept in the other bed. It was a slanting roof and there was a window under there and the glass had been knocked out of it and Dad had gone up to put a board or something in that and when he was up there we three kids were in bed. When he came up to do that, Mother came and brought the light up and she set it on the dresser and she turned to leave and when she turned it was when the lightning struck. She was killed instantly. Dad always said that he had his pipe in his mouth and it was blown out and the top of his hair never came back. "

From St. Cloud Times (Saint Cloud, Minnesota) 08 Apr 1938, Fri:
"40-25 Years Ago in St. Cloud, as taken from the files of The Daily Times in its early career as a daily newspaper…
Miss Ida Leubecher of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is visiting in this city, the guest of her sister, Mrs. John Hommes."

Max Miller and Ida Leubecher were married at Mrs. Leubecher’s farm.

Ida's original tombstone read "God's finger touched me and I slept." It was about 1 or 1 and 1/2 feet tall, a little spire, sitting on a 12" square base. It was put up by Augusta Leubecher since Max didn't get around to putting up a headstone. Cliff, after Max's death, removed the original tombstone and installed a contemporary stone (without any discussion with Hazel or Elsie).

From the Daily Argus Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Tuesday, August 3, 1909:
“Killed By Lighning
“Mrs. Max Miller, Who Lived Near Schindler, Killed by Lightning Bolt Monday Evening
“Husband and Three Children, Who Were in the House at the Time, Escaped Injury

“About 9:30 Monday evening Mrs. Max Miller, who lived with her husband on a farm one mile from Schindler, was struck by a bolt of lightning and instantly killed. Deceased was 37 years of age, and was born Miss Ida Leubecher, and was well-known in Sioux Falls, the Leubecher family having spent the last 30 years in Minnehaha County.

“It was during the same storm that passed over Sioux Falls Monday evening that the accident took place. Mr. and Mrs. Miller and three children were all in the house. Mrs. Miller had put the three children to bed and she was about ready to retire. Mrs. Miller stood near the chimney with her back to the chimney. Mr. Miller was sitting on the other side of the room near the telephone. A sharp flash of lightning came, filling the room with a bluish blaze. Mrs. Miller fell to the floor. Mr. Miller, who was for a few minutes dazed by a light shock which came in over the telephone wire, finally went to his wife and found her unconscious as he supposed. He immediately called for medical aid. Dr. W. F. Keller of this city, was summoned, and in company with N. E. Stringham he drove to the Miller home as rapidly as possible.

“It was about 11:30 when Dr. Keller and Mr. Stringham arrived at the Miller home. Dr. Keller at once made an examination. He found the unfortunate woman stiff in death which convinced him that she was killed instantly. An investigation revealed that Mrs. Miller had been struck by the bolt in the back of the head. The lightning then ran down and around the neck and across the breast, burning the flesh severely.

“Miss Gussie Leubecher, stenographer at the Sioux Falls National bank is a sister of the dead woman. She knew nothing of the accident until this morning, when she was informed of the untimely death of her sister, and she at once left for the Miller home.”

From the “Shindlar Department” column in The Harrisburg Journal, Friday, August 6:
“Killed By Lightning:
“The sad news reached this city early Tuesday morning that Mrs. Max Miller of Springdale was killed by lightning on Monday night while retiring to rest. She had just put the children to bed when the lightning struck the chimney and ran down hitting her in the neck killing her almost instantly. Dr. Steenson was called and hurried to the scene of the sad calamity but life was extinct. Mr. Miller was also hit but not fatally. Mrs. Miller was formerly Miss Ada [sic] Leubecher and the many friends of the family extend sympathy in their sorrow.”

From the “Shindlar Department-Shindlar News” column of The Harrisburg Journal, Friday, August 13, 1909:

“The funeral of Mrs. Max Miller was held last week Thursday P.M. A short service was held at the residence, and the regular church service at the Lutheran church in Sioux Falls, of which she was a faithful member. Mrs. Miller leaves a heartbroken husband, three children, both parents, three sisters and a brother to mourn her loss. She will be greatly missed at the Shindlar Union S.S. as she was one of those broad minded christians who, laying creed aside, can worship where ever oppoortunity offers. She was a dutiful daughter, a faithful wife, a loving and indulgent mother, a loving sister and a good neighbor. Her many friends will long remember her pure christian life. The floral offerings were many and beautiful showing the high esteem in which she was held.”,

Funeral announcement:
From Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 4 Aug 1909, Wed.
"The funeral of Mrs. Max Miller, formerly Ida Leubecher, will take place at the country home at one o'clock, and at the German Lutheran church, Fourteenth Street and Spring Avenue, Thursday, Aug. t."

From the Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) 6 Aug 1909, Fri:
"CARD OF THANKS
We, the undersigned, wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude to the friends and neighbors who came to our aid with acts of kindness and words of comfort during our recent bereavement. We also wish to extend thanks to those neighbors and friends who sent floral offerings.
-Max Miller,
-Mr. and Mrs. George Leubecher and family,
-Mrs. Augusta Miller and family." 
LEUBECHER, Ida (I228)
 
96 "Was buried from the Episcopal Cathedral at Faribault, Bishop Whippe of Minnesota, officiating;
He studied law with his brother the Hon. Joshua A. Lowell and was admitted to the bar 1830.
He practiced law in Rockland, Knox, Maine., 25 years, where he rose to great eminence throughout all New England.
1855, he removed to Faribault, Minn., where he was judge of the lower court, called "one of the brightest ornaments of his profession."

1850 Census: ME: Lincoln: Rockland: p. 113A:
Henry C. Lowell, 47, atty at law, $15,000, born in ME;
Mercy G., 48, born in ME;
Charles L., 20, in law office, born in ME;
Caroline A., 16, born in ME;
Sarah T., 13, born in New Brunswick;
Rosemas C, 25, clerk, born in ME;
Justina A., 22, born in ME;
Julia Williams Lowell, 4, born in ME.

1860 Census: MN: Rice: Walcott Twp:
H. C. Lowell, 55, atty at law, $3000 real estate, $300 personal, born in ME;
Mercy, 58, born in ME;
Caroline A., 25, born in ME;
Julia W., 14, born in ME.

Minnesota Cemetery Inscription Index:
Township: Cannon City
County: Rice
Name: Henry Clay Hon. Lowell
Birth: 01/Sep/1803
Death: 19/Mar/1863
Cemetery: Good Shepherd Aband.
Comments: SP. Mercy, burial according to 1882 History Book of Rice County.

From the Faribault Central Republican, March 25, 1863:
"Died, at Le Sueur on Thursday Morning, 19th Inst., of inflammation of the stomach, after an illness of only three days. Age 59 years and 7 months, Judge Lowell was a prominent member of the Bar of this county, and left here the Saturday previous, in his usual good health, to attend a term of court in Le Sueur. He was taken sick early on Monday morning, and died before his family, for whom a messenger was sent, could reach him. His funeral was attended by a large concourse of citizens, on Sunday afternoon, from his late residence. The entire community will deeply sympathized with the family in their sudden bereavement." 
LOWELL, Henry Clay (I536)
 
97 "Werelate.org" lists christening date of 5 Jan 1621 in Hampton, Hampshire, England and a death date of bef 16 Jun 1674 in Martha's Vineyard. No parents of John Smith identified. SMITH, John (I6914)
 
98 "Werelate.org" website lists death date as 2 Dec 1708 at Edgartown, Dukes, Massachusetts. SMITH, Philip (I6912)
 
99 "WERY [I] de Walcourt (-after [1131]). “...Wedericus de Walecorth...” witnessed the charter dated 14 Jun 1096 under which Otbert Bishop of Liège declared having bought Couvin castle from Baudouin de Mons. "...Wirico de Walecurt" witnessed the charter dated 1107 under which Bruno Archbishop of Trier founded Kloster Springirsbach. "...Wiricus advocatus..." witnessed the charter dated 1114 under which Bruno Archbishop of Trier donated property “in Liemena” to his cathedral. "Lamberti comitis, Gvidrici de Walecurte, Gvigeri advocati..." subscribed the charter dated 1127 under which Renaud Archbishop of Reims granted "quomodo de beneficio...ad castellum...Bullion" to the bishop of Liège. Seigneur de Walcourt. "Le seigneur Wiric de Walcourt et sa femme...Adheleide" founded Freistorff abbey, with the consent of “leurs deux fils Arnou et Theodore et de leurs cinq filles Kamer, Adeleide, Frelende, Sophie et Aramburge”, and donated “la seigneurie...à Sombrique” for the soul of “Frenlaude leur fille à la prière d’Arnou son époux et de Gerard et Adelheide leurs enfans, du consentement de Theodoric leur neveu, fils d’Arnaud son frère”, by charter dated to [1131], which also records that “le grand Arnaud de Walcourt père dud. Arnauld” donated “la demie chapelle d’Aulstor avec sa dot et un fils nommé Ancelin avec sa sœur Marie”.

m ADELAIDE, daughter of --- (-after [1131]). "Le seigneur Wiric de Walcourt et sa femme...Adheleide" founded Freistorff abbey, with the consent of “leurs deux fils Arnou et Theodore et de leurs cinq filles Kamer, Adeleide, Frelende, Sophie et Aramburge” by charter dated to [1131]. It is possible that Wéry inherited these territories in Lorraine as a result of his marriage, although no precise information has been located on the family origin of Adelaide.

Wéry [I] & his wife had seven children." 
Wery I de Walcourt (I20527)
 
100 “ --- . m BERTRADA, daughter of ---. The editor of Einhard's Annals in the MGH SS series records that "Pippinus…uxoris pater et Avia Charibertus et Bertradana" founded the monastery of Prüm. This is presumably based on the charter dated 23 Juun 720 under which "Bertrada seu Berta et filius meus Chairibertus" donated property to Prüm, witnessed by "Bernarius, Chrodolande, Theodericus", although the charter is probably spurious as it predates the foundation of the abbey. It is assumed that this refers to the mother of Charibert, father of Queen Bertrada, although another possibility is that it refers to the wife of Charibert and an otherwise unknown son of Charibert, brother of Queen Bertrada. The Monumenta Epternacensia record a donation by "Berta, filiis meis Chardradus et Harbertus". [Three] children:
a) HARDRAD (-after 720). The Monumenta Epternacensia record a donation by "Berta, filiis meis Chardradus et Harbertus".
b) CHARIBERT [Heribert] (-after 23 Jun 720). "Bertrada seu Berta et filius meus Chairibertus" donated property to Prüm by charter dated 23 Jun 720, although the charter is probably spurious as it predates the foundation of the abbey. The Monumenta Epternacensia record a donation by "Berta, filiis meis Chardradus et Harbertus". Comte de Laon. m ---. The name of Charibert´s wife is not known. Charibert & his wife had one child:
i) BERTRADA [Berta] "au Grand Pied" ([720]-Choisy-au-Bac, near Compiègne 12 Jun 783, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). The Annales Laurissenses record the marriage in 749 of "Bertradem cognomine Bertam, Cariberti Laudunensis comittis filiam" and "Pippinus". "Pippinus rex Francorum" donated property to found Kloster Prüm by charter dated 13 Aug 762 which names "coniux mea Bertrada…genitor suus Heribertus". Pepin planned to divorce his wife, but was convinced otherwise by Pope Paul I in 762. After the death of her husband, Bertrada assumed a prominent role in government. She tried unsuccessfully to reconcile her two sons, meeting with Carloman at Seltz and also travelling to Italy in 770. The necrology of Arrgenteuil Priory records the death "IV Id Jul" of "Bertrada regina". m ([743/44]) PEPIN maior domus, son of CHARLES "Martel" maior domus of Austrasia and Neustria [Carolingian] & his first wife Chrothrudis (715-Saint-Denis 24 Sep 768, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). He succeeded in 751 as PEPIN “le Bref” King of the Franks.
c) [WETA . "Asuarius" abbot of Prüm noted a donation to the abbey by "filia in Christo Wetane", which names "genetricis tue [Wetane] Bertradane" and "Cario et coniuge tue Wettane", by undated charter dated to [762/804]. It is not certain that "Bertradane" was the same person as the mother of Charibert, although the common connection with Prüm indicates that this is possible. If this is correct, the charter is probably datable to the earliest part of the suggested date range, assuming that the date of Bertrada's 720 charter (see above) is correct and at that date her son Charibert was already an adult. m CARIO .]”


From Wikipedia:
“Bertrada (b. ca. 670 - d. after 721), also called Berthe or Bertree, and perhaps a Merovingian princess, is known to be the mother of Caribert of Laon, with whom she is co-founder and benefactor of the Prüm Abbey. They founded the abbey in 721.
Through Charibert's daughter Bertrada of Laon, wife of Pippin the Younger, Bertrada is the great-grandmother of Charlemagne.
There is some dispute as to her husband and parents. The following are two of many possible scenarios:
-She was daughter of the seneschal and Pfalzgraf Hugobert and Irmina of Oeren. Her husband is unknown.
-She was daughter of Theuderic III, king of Neustria and Austrasia, and Clotilda of Heristal. She married Martin of Laon. (This is shown in The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call; Chart 2001)”«s87» 
Bertrada Abbess of Prüm (I10770)
 
101 “ [BERGLJOT Thoresdatter. The Historia Norwegie names "Bergliota filia Thoris Tacentis", from "nobilissima Morensium ac Halogensium comitum prosapia", as the wife of "Siwardo". Snorre names "Bergljot, a daughter of Earl Thorer the Silent" & his wife as the wife of Sigurd. m SIGURD Jarl, son of HAAKON Grjotgardson Jarl of Haalogaland & his wife -- (-murdered Oglo 962).”«s87» THORESDTR, Bergljot (I9613)
 
102 “ [THORE Ragnvaldsson "Tause/the Silent". Orkneyinga Saga names “Ivar and Thorer the Silent” as the two other sons of “Earl Rognwald” and his wife “Ragnhild the daughter of Hrolf Nose”. Snorre names "Rolf and Thorer" as the two sons of "Earl Ragnvald" and his wife Hild. He succeeded his father in [894] as Jarl of Möre, having dispossessed Gudrod "Ljome", son of King Harald, who had seized Möre on the death of Jarl Ragnvald. m ([890]) ALOF "Aarbod/Season-bettering", daughter of HARALD I "Hårfagre/Harfagri/Fairhair" King of Norway & his second wife Gyda of Hordaland. Snorre records that King Harald gave Jarl Thore his daughter "Alof, called Arbot" after the king confirmed him as Jarl of Möre.] [Thore & his wife had one child.]”«s87» the Silent”, Thore “Tause RAGNVALDSSON (I14043)
 
103 “ AUBRY [II], son of [AUBRY [I] de Mello & his wife Adela ---] (-1129 or after). According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Aubry [II] Comte de Dammartin was the son of Aubry [I] de Mello. It appears that this is speculative based only on the name and the hypothesis that his mother was a member of the family of the first comtes de Dammartin. Comte de Dammartin. Chambrier de France 1122 to 1129.
“m ---. The name of Aubry´s wife is not known.”«s87» 
Aubry II de Mello, Comte de Dammartin (I15578)
 
104 “ BALDWIN Wake ([1237/38]-before 10 Feb 1282). The Chronicle of Meaux, in Yorkshire, names "Baldewinum de Wake" as the son of "Hugo de Wake" and his wife "Johannam". A writ dated 6 Apr "4 Edw I", after the death of "Joan de Stutevill" names "S"Sir Baldwin de Wake her son is her next heir and of full age", and also refers to events "after the death of Hugh le Bigot sometime her husband". Inquisitions after a writ "10 Edw I" following the death of "Baldwin Wake” name “aid in making hiis eldest son a knight and marrying his daughter...Hawis his wife”. m firstly ELA de Beauchamp, daughter of WILLIAM de Beauchamp Baron of Bedford & his second wife Ida Longespée of Salisbury (-before 10 Jan 1267). By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands and, in respect of the third part, placed "Johannam, Idam et Isabellam filias Ele Wake et heredes predicte Johanne de tertia parte" in the custory of "Edwardo primogenito suo" as guardians. m secondly (before 5 Feb 1268) HAWISE de Quincy, daughter of ROBERT de Quincy & his wife Helen of Wales ([1250]-before 27 Mar 1285). An undated writ "48 Hen III", after the death of "Roger de Quency earl of Winchester", records that "Joan, wife of Sir Humphrey de Boum the younger of full age, and Hawis, within age, daughters of the late Robert de Quency" were his heirs in the manor of "Styventon alias Steventon [Bedford]". Inquisitions after a writ "10 Edw I" following the death of "Baldwin Wake” name “aid in making his eldest son a knight and marrying his daughter...Hawis his wife”. A writ dated 15 Dec "12 Edw I", after the death of "Joan late the wife of Humphrey de Boun alias de Bohun", records that she died "on Thursday the feast of St Katherine 12 Edw I" and that "Hawis her sister, late the wife of Baldwin Wake, is her next heir and of full age". Baldwin & his first wife had three children...Baldwin & his second wife had three children.”«s87» WAKE, Baldwin Knight (I11874)
 
105 “ JOSCELIN [I] de Courtenay ([1034]-after 1065). The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Atho filius cuiusdam Gastellarii de Castro-Rainardo" acquired "castrum Cortinaci", married "quondam nobilem dominam" by whom he had "Joscelinum de Cortinaco". Seigneur de Courtenay. m firstly ([1060]) HILDEGARDE de Château-Landon, daughter of GEOFFROY [II] "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais & his wife Ermengarde d'Anjou . The Historia of Monk Aimon records the marriage of "Joscecelinum de Cortinaco" and "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole" by whom he had one daughter, who was mother of two sons "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio". The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. m secondly ISABELLE de Montlhéry, daughter of GUY "le Grand" Seigneur de Montlhéry & his wife Hodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté. The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Brayo et Guidonem Rubeum, Comitissam quoque Reiteste, et Bonam-vecinam de Pontibus, EElizabeth etiam uxorem Joscelini de Corteciniaco, insuper dominam de Puisat, et dominam de S. Galerico" as the children of "Guidonem" and his wife, stating in a later passage that "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico" was the second wiffe of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco". It appears chronologically more probable that Isabelle was the daughter of Guy rather than his son Milon, but this is not without doubt. A charter dated 1133 records a donation to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Senens by "Milo de Curteno", adding that his widowed mother had become a nun there and that “frater eius Rainaudus” was buried there, which confirms that Milo was the son of his father´s second marriage. William of Tyre specifies that the mother of Joscelin de Courtenay Count of Edessa was the sister of the mother of Baudouin de Bourg, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity between Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162. Joscelin [I] & his first wife had one child:
(a) VAINDEMONDE de Courtenay . According to the Historia of Monk Aimon, "Guidonem et Raynardum Comitem de Johegneio" were the two sons of the daughter of "Joscelinum de Cortinaco" by his wife "filiam comitis Gaufridi Foerole". The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. m RENARD [II] Comte de Joigny, son of GEOFFROY Comte de Joigny & his wife ---.
Joscelin [I] & his second wife had six children:
(b) ETIENNE de Courtenay (-1101). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. m HERSENT de Montereau, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Etienne & his wife had one child:
(1) ADAM de Chailly . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
(c) HODIERNE de Courtenay . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not so far been identified. "Geoffroy senex sire de Joinville", with the consent of "Geoffroy son fils et de Hodierne sa bru", donated property to the church of Vaucouleurs, by charter dated to [1070/80]. m (1080) GEOFFROY [II] Sire de Joinville, son of GEOFFROY [I] Sire de Joinville & his wife Blanche de Reynel (-before 1101).
(d) MILON de Courtenay (-after 1133). The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico". 1127. Sire de Courtenay.
(e) JOSCELIN de Courtenay (-Aleppo 1131, before 1 Oct). The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico". William of Tyre refers to "Joscelinus de Cortenay vir nobilis de Francia de regione dicitur Gastineis" as "consobrinus" of Baudouin du Bourg Count of Edessa, later Baudouin II King of Jerusalem, when he records his arrivaval in Edessa in 1102 after being called from France by Baudouin. In a later passage, he specifies that his mother was the sister of Baudouin de Bourg's mother, according to the testimony of her granddaughter concerning the consanguinity betweeeen Amaury I King of Jerusalem and his first wife which provided the basis for the annulment of their marriage in 1162. He went to Syria after the First Crusade, maybe during the crusade of 1101. William of Tyre refers to him as "consanguineus" of Count Baudouin when they were both captured the following year. He arrived in Palestine, probably with the contingent led by Guillaume II Comte de Nevers. On his arrival, Baudouin II Count of Edessa enfeoffed him with land west of the Eupphrates, with his capital at Turbessel. In Summer 1103, he took part in the raid against the territory of Aleppo led by Bohémond I Prince of Antioch and captured Muslimiye. In 1104, he captured Marash. He was captured with Baudouin II Count of Edessa by Soqman, Ortokid Prince of Mardin, after the battle of Harran in 1104, released in 1107 but exchanged himself with Baudouin Count of Edessa to ensure the latter's release although released again within a few months. Suspected by Count Baudouin of wishing to supplant him as Count of Edessa, he was imprisoned in 1112 and subsequently went southwards where he was enfeoffed as Prince of Galilee by Baudouin I King of Jerusalem. He succeeded in 1118 as JOSCELIN I Count of Edessaa, chosen by Baudouin II shortly after he became king of Jerusalem. He was captured by Balak near Saruj Sep 1122 and imprisoned in the fortress of Khartpert. The Frankish prisoners seized control of the fortress Aug 1123, and he escaped to call for support[236]. In 1128, he raided villages in Antioch's territory in reprisal for Bohémond II Prince of Antioch's denunciation of the agreement concerning his second wife's dowry. He died from wounds received in an accident while besieging a small castle north-east of Aleppo. The Histoire Universelle of Vartan le Grand records that "[Josselin le Jeune] seigneur de Hrom-Gla" was captured by Moslems while hunting and taken to Aleppo where he died.
(f) GEOFFROY "Charpalu" de Courtenay (-[1137/39]). The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Milonem de Cortiniaco, Joscelinum Comitem Edesse, Gaufridum Chapalii" as the children of "Joscelinum de Cortiaco" and his wife "Elisabeth filiam Milonis de Monte-Letherico". William of Tyre names him as brother of Joscelin "senior" de Courtenay Count of Edessa, when recording his death. He went to Syria after the First Crusade.
(g) RENAUD de Courtenay (-bur Sens Saint-Jean). A charter dated 1133 records a donation to the abbey of Saint-Jean de Sens by "Milo de Curteno", adding that his widowed mother had become a nun there and that “frater eius Rainaudus” was buried there.”«s87» 
Joscelin I Seigneur de Courtenay (I14234)
 
106 “ ROGER [I] de Mortemer (-[1078/86]). Seigneur de Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai, Normandy. [same person as…? ROGER, son of HUGUES d´Ivry Bishop of Bayeux & his [wife/mistress ---] (-after [1037/55]). The question of the possible co-identity of Roger [I] de Mortemer and Roger, son of the bishop, is discussed in the Introduction [see Source #99].] Roger de Mortemer was related to the Warenne family but the precise relationship has not been determined.... Orderic Vitalis records that "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" led the Norman forces ("Caletorum catervam" = troops from the pays de Caux) who defeated Eudes, brother of Henri I King of France ("Odonem fratrem suum") "apud Mortuum-mare" in 1054. In a later passage, recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, the same source records that "Rogerium de Mortuomari et omnes Caletenses" had defeated the French troops "apud Mortuum-Mare" but that "Rogerius princeps" helped the escape of "Rodulfus…comes" (identified more precisely in another passage as "Radulfum comitem de Monte-Desiderii") to whom he had done homage, for which treachery Roger was exiled and his lands confiscated, including "castrum…Mortui Marri" which was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius". The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Mortuomari" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066, which suggests that he had been fully reconciled with the future William I King of England by that time. He acquired land at Wigmore which had been forfeited by Roger Earl of Hereford in 1075. "…Rotberto de Bello Monte, Henrici de Bello Monte, Rotberti Gifordi, Rogerii de Mortuo Mari, Goiffridi de Calvo Monte, Radulfi dapiferi, Mauricii cancellarii, Willelmi de Warenna, Gundrede uxoris W. de Warenna" subscribed the undated charter under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by William de Warrenne of the church of St Pancras to the monastery of Cluny, dated to [1078/81] by the Complete Peerage. Roger is not named in Domesday Book in 1086. m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-after her husband). The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that "Rogier de Mortemer" married "la Contesse de Glochestre que Jehan de la Chapelle avoit amée" after the conquest of England. "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery). As her husband is not named in the grant, it is likely that she outlived him. Roger de Mortemer & his wife had one child.”

From "The Mortimer Family of Wigmore: An outline lineage" by Ian Mortimer. Version 3.0, 16 June 2016:
Roger de Mortemer (fl. 1054-78) seigneur of Mortemer-sur-Eaulen, in the Neufchâtel region of Normandy, was the first to use the name. He was the son of Ralph I de Warenne (fl. 1035-50) and Beatrice de Vascoeuil, whoe mother was a niece of Gunnor, the wife of Duke Richard I of Normandy (922-960). Thus Roger de Mortemer was a third cousin of William the Conqueror. His elder brother, Ralph II de Warenne, married Emma and had sons Ralph III de Warenne and William I de Warenne (d. 1088). When Roger released his own feudal lord and Duke William's enemy, Ralph de Montdidier (d. 1074), later count of Valois, whom he had captured at the battle of Mortemer in 1054, Duke William seized Roger's estates. Thy were later restored, with the exception of Mortemer itself, which was bestowed on Roger's nephew, William I de Warenne. Thereafter Roger's seat was at Saint-Victor, twenty-five miles to the west. The reference by Wace to one "Hugh de Mortemer" spurring his horse and charging the Saxons at Hastings in the company of the lords of Auvilliers, Les Oubeaux and Saint-Clair, should be taken to refer to Roger (as far as it can be taken to refer to any historical personage), as there was no other male member of the de Mortemer family of full age in Normandy at that time. In 1074 Roger and his wife Hawise petitioned William I of England and John, archbishop of Rouen, for the recently founded priory of Saint-Victor to be made into an abbey. Roger was still alive in 1078, which can be dated to 1078x81. It is safe to presume that he was dead by 1086, as he does not appear in Domesday. He was survived by at least one son: 1. Ralph Mortimer (fl. 1075-1115). 
DE MORTIMER, Roger (I13450)
 
107 “---, son of --- . m MATHILDE of Burgundy, daughter of CONRAD I “le Pacifique” King of Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian]. "Rodulfus rex et Mathildis soror eius" are named as children of "Mathilde…filia…Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Mathilde was mother of Berta who was mother of "Geroldus Genevensis".”«s87» Mathilde of Burgundy (I15683)
 
108 “... d. Aug. 14, 1905, leaving, I understand, one child. Lived, I think, at Council Bluffs, Iowa.”«s15» MITCHELL, Charles Albert (I3553)
 
109 “...Her will, dated Sept. 3, 1679, proved July 20, 1680, gives to son Josiah a cow “if he molest not my son Moses in his present dwelling and possessions”; to son John, a cow and a horse; to daughters Elizabeth Gilbert and Mary Marsh, and granddaughter Mary Marsh, some household effects; “to son Moses (who hath all his life carried himself so dutifully to myself and his father) the great bible and the whole house and land he now possesses which I declare his father gave him.” Sons Moses Belcher and Alexander Marsh executors.”«s82» Catherine (I7699)
 
110 “...married ___ Mayhouse.”«s72» MAYHOUSE, ? (I1525)
 
111 “...married ______ Heselrigg, descendant of Robert de Hesilrage, one of the knights who came with William.”«s72» HASELRIGG, ? (I1535)
 
112 “...married _______Baskerville, a family having direct descent from Charlemagne, residing at Yardley.”«s72» BASKERVILLE, ? (I1540)
 
113 “...married a daughter of Edmund and Elizabeth (Panthuit) Percival, of Weston-in-Gordano. The pedigree of Edmund Percival is traced back to Endes, Sovereign Duke of Brittany, first cousin to Robert, father of William the Conqueror. Edmund is of the sixteenth generation in the Percival lineage. From this family Percival Lowell received his name.”«s72» PERCIVAL, Anne (I1513)
 
114 “...married Joan Russell, presumed to be descendant of Hugh de Rozel, who came with the Conqueror, and whose lineage is traced to Charlemagne.”«s72» RUSSEL, Joane (I1533)
 
115 “‘Magdalene, gift med Christopher Nilsson Grøn (Grønnow) til Harrestad i Randeberg, lagmann i Stavanger' er feil. Hun var gift med en annen Christopher Nilsson som skrev seg 'til' Hana i Sandnes.

Magdalene Jonsdtr. gift med Christopher Nilsson er eier av Larsgard ca. 1580

“I årbok for Hardanger Historielag 1986 har Anders Stølen ein artikkel der han i ei ætteliste skriv at dotter til Jon Gudtormsson: Magdalena Jonsdotter g. m. Kristoffer Hana har ei dotter Magdalena g.m. Eirik Gjordsson Fugleberg (Kvinnherad)død før 1597. Anders Stølen gjev diverre ikkje opp noko kjelde for denne ættelista. I byrjinga av 1600-talet bur det ein Klement på same bruket som kan vere son til Eirik. Kan det vere denne Klement som har flytta til Larsgård, Hol eller nært slektskap?”

“Erik Bakkevig nevner også dette i Sunnhordlands-slekter bd. I s. 99. Han skriver: 'med Christopher hadde hun (Magdalena Jonsdtr.) sønnen Svale og sannsynligvis datteren Magdalena, gift med 1. Erik Gjordsen Fugleberg i Kvinnherad og 2. Paul Knutsen.' Heller ikke her kildehenvisninger. Noen Klement nevner ikke Bakkevig.”«s45» 
JONSDTR, Magdalene (I10550)
 
116 “(Latin: Meroveus or Merovius; German: Merowech; Spanish: Meroveo; French: Mérovée, other spellings include Merovech, Merovich, Merwich)

The Merovingian dynasty is named for him. Ruled the Franks from 448 to 457.”

“MEROVECH (-[451/57]). It is not known whether Merovech was a purely mythical figure or if there is some factual basis for his existence. If he did exist, his precise ancestry is not known. Gregory of Tours writes that "some say that Merovechh, the father of Childeric, was descended from Chlodio" but this is the only reference he makes to Merovech in his work. The early 8th century Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Merovechus de genere eius" as successor to Chlodio, commenting that hhe gave his name to the dynasty. Fredegar asserts, colourfully, that Merovech was conceived when Chlodio's wife went swimming and encountered a Quinotaur[16]. It is possible that Merovech succeeded Chlodio as leader of the Franks in Roman Gaul. Assuming that he did enjoy some sort of leadership role over some or all of the Frankish tribes in Gaul, it seems inappropriate to attribute the title "king" to Merovech. In the first place, it is likely that his leadership was localised. In addition, Roman domination continued until the overthrow in 476 of the last Roman Emperor in the West, Romulus Augustulus, and no documentary evidence has so far been identified which suggests that there was a sub-level of Frankish administration, despite the fact that imperial authority was in decline during the later years.
m ---. The name of Merovech's wife is not known.
Merovech is recorded as having one child.”«s60», «s87» 
Merovech (Merowig) (I11060)
 
117 “[---] . King of the Pissa.
m MENIA ---. The Historia Langobardorum names "mater…Audoin…Menia uxor fuit Pissæ regis"[146]. This wording suggests that "Pissæ regis" was not the father of Audoin, presumably Menia's second husband. It is assumed that "Pissæ" indicates that he was king of a tribe of that name.
[Pissa] & his wife had one child.”«s87» 
DE LANGOBARDI, Pitzias (I10730)
 
118 “[ALIX] [Adelaide] de France ([4 Oct] 1160-after 1200). Robert of Torigny records the death in 1160 of "Constantia regina Franciæ" while giving birth to a daughter. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records that King Louis VII had "aliam filiam de Constantia…Adelaidis", her mother dying while giving birth to her. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "reginam Margaretam Anglie et comitissam Aaliz" as childen of King Louis VII & his second wife, specifying that Alix mamarried "Guilelmus comes de Pontivo". This highlights the general confusion between this daughter and King Louis VII's supposed daughter Alix by his third wife (see below). Roger of Hoveden records that the betrothal of King Louis's daughter tto Richard of England was first proposed in 1161, when Richard's older brother Henry was betrothed to her sister Marguerite. Chronologically, this can only refer to the king's daughter by his second marriage. This appears to be confirmed by the Chronicle of Gervase which records the betrothal in 1169 of "Ricardus…filius regis Anglæ" and "filiam regis Franciæ quam habuit de filia regis Hispanorum". Ctss de Bourges 1174, as her dowry. Benedict of Peterborough records the betrothal "X"XI Kal Oct 1177" of "rex Anglie…Ricardus comes Pictaviæ filius eius" and "regi Franciæ…filiam" as part of the peace agreement between the two kings. It is assumed that this refers to the same daughter, although the primary source which confirmrms this beyond doubt has not yet been identified. If this is correct, she was presumably the same daughter who later married the Comte de Ponthieu. Until further information comes to light, it is assumed that Alix/Adelaide who was betrothed tto Richard, and who later married the Comte de Ponthieu, was the daughter who was born in 1160, and that King Louis had no daughter of this name by his third marriage. Alix was brought up in England after her betrothal. Benedict of Peterborougugh records that the betrothal of "Alesia soror eius [Philippi regis Franciæ]" and Richard was renewed in 1189, commenting that the king of England "in custodia habet". Richard refused the marriage after his accession to the throne. Kerrebrouck states that King Richard arranged her betrothal to his younger brother John in early 1193, but the primary source which confirms this has not yet been identified. She returned to France in Aug 1195. The primary source which confirms her marrriage has not yet been identified. Ctss d'Eu, Dame d’Arques in 1195, as her dowry for her marriage. Betrothed (by peace treaty 30 Sep 1174, betrothed 21 Sep 1177) to RICHARD of England, son of HENRY II King of England & Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 8 Sep 1157-Chalus 6 Apr 1199, bur Fontevrault Abbey). He succeeded his father in 1189 as RICHARD I " Cœur-de-lion " King of England. Betrothed (early 1193) to JOHN of England, son of HENRY II King of England & his wife Eléonore Dss d'Aquitaine (Beaumont Palace, Oxford 24 Dec 1166-Newark Castle, Lincolnshire 18/19 Oct 1216, bur Worcester Cathedral). This betrothal appears to have taken place despite the fact that John was already married to his first wife at the time. He succeeded his brother in 1199 as JOHN King of England. m (contract Mantes, Yvelines 20 Aug 1195) GUILLAUME II “Talvas” Comte de Ponthieu et de Montreuil, son of JEAN I Comte de Ponthieu & his third wife Béatrice de Saint-Pol (after 1178-6 Oct 1221, bur Abbaye de Valloires, Somme).”«s87» Alix (Adelaide) de France (I15415)
 
119 “[ARTAUD [I] (-[960]). Auguste Bernard states that Guillaume Comte de Lyon divided his territories between his children: "à Guillaume l´aîné…le Lyonnais, à Artaud le Forez, et à Bernard ou Béraud ou Gérard, la sirerie de Beaujolais", who he says was the youngest of the three sons of Guillaume [I] Comte de Lyon (see BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY), but he cites no primary source on which he bases his statement. If this is correct, Artaud [I] would have been the younger brother of Comte Guiillaume [I] shown above. 900. Samuel Guichenon, in his Histoire de la Souverainté de Dombes written in 1662, refers to Comte Artaud [I] who lived in 900 and his son Geraud, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. According to Auguste Bernard, Artaud [I] died in 960, but he cites no primary source on which he bases his statement. m ---. The name of Artaud's wife is not known. According to Auguste Bernard, the wife of Artaud [I] was "Taresia", whose death, he says, is recorded "V Id Jun" in the necrology of the priory of Ambierle, but he cites no primary source on which he bases his statement. Artaud [I] & his wife had one child]”«s87» Artaud I (I14351)
 
120 “[AZNAR Galíndez (-[839]). Conde [de Aragón]. The Codex de Roda records that "Asnari Galindones" was expelled from his county by his son-in-law García "el Malo" and went to France, stating that "Carli Magni" (presumably a mistake for Emperor Louis I) granted him "Cerretania et Oriello", where he was buried. m ---. The name of Aznar Galindez's wife is not known. Conde Aznar Galindez & his wife had four children:
(a) CENTULIO Aznar (-murdered [838]). The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones", recording that Centulio was murdered by his brother-in-law García "el Malo".
(b) GALINDO [I] Aznar (-867). The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones". He succeeded his father in [839] as Conde de Cerdaña y Urgel. He succeeded his brother-in-law in 858 as Conde de Aragón, Urgel, Conflent, Cerdaña, Pallars, Ribagorza 858, with support from García I Iñíguez King of Pamplona, confirmed by the marriage of his son to the king's daughter.
(c) MATRONA Aznar . The Codex de Roda names "Centolle Asnari et Galindo Asnari et domna Matrona" as the children of "Asnari Galindones", stating that Matrona married "Garsie Malo filium Galindi Belascotenes et domne Fakilo" who repudiated her after he killed her brother. m (repudiated 825) as his wife, GARCÍA Galíndez "el Malo", son of GALINDO Velázquez & his wife Faquilo --- (-858). He deposed his father-in-law and succeeded in 838 as Conde de Aragón .
(d) EILONA [Aylo] Aznar . She is named in a charter dated 863.”«s87» 
Aznar Galíndez I Conde de Aragón (I14894)
 
121 “[BEGO ([755/60]-28 Oct 816). The primary source which establishes that Bego was the son of Gerard has not so far been identified. Marquis de Septimanie: Bego governed the county of Toulouse as "marchio" for Septimania from 806. He was chambrier, equivalent to viceroy, for Louis King of Aquitaine (son of Emperor Charlemagne). Comte de Paris in [815], succeeding comte Stephanus. He founded the Abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés near Paris. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "V Kal Nov" of "Begoni comitis". [m firstly ---. There is no proof of this possible first marriage of Bego. However, as noted below, if his wife Alpais was the daughter of Emperor Louis, there would have been a considerable age difference between her and Bego, which suggests the possibility of an earlier marriage.] m [secondly] ([806]) ALPAIS, illegitimate daughter of [Emperor LOUIS I & his mistress ---] ([793/94]-23 Jul 852 or after, bur [Reims]). Flodoard refers to "Ludowicus Alpheidi filie sue uxori Begonis comitis". The Annales Hildesheimenses name "filiam imperatoris…Elpheid" as the wife of "Bicgo de amici regis" when recording the death of her husband. Settipani discusses the debate abouut the paternity of Alpais, preferring the theory that Emperor Charles I was her father. If Emperor Louis was her father, it is unlikely that she was born before [793/94], given his known birth date in 778. It would therefore be chronologicalllly tight for her to have had [three] children by her husband before his death in 816. However, no indication has been found in primary sources of the ages of these children when their father died. The question of her paternity is obviously not beyond doubt, but it is felt preferable to show her as the probable daughter of Emperor Louis in view of the clear statement in Flodoard. If Alpais was the daughter of Emperor Louis, it is likely that she was not her husband's only wife in view of his estimated birth date. After her husband died, she became abbess of Saint-Pierre-le-Bas at Reims in [817]. She was still there 29 May 852. Bego & his [second] wife had three children:
i) LIUTHARD . Flodoard names "ipsius Alpheidis vel filiorum eius Letardi et Ebrardi" when recording their mother's donation to the church of Reims.
ii) EBERHARD . Flodoard names "ipsius Alpheidis vel filiorum eius Letardi et Ebrardi" when recording their mother's donation to the church of Reims.
iii) SUSANNA . The primary source which establishes that Susanna was the daughter of Bego has not so far been identified. "Vulfardus" donated property to Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire for the souls of "genitoris mei Vulfardi et genetrice mea Susannane necnon et germanorum fratrum meorum Adelardo, Vulgrino, Ymo et sorore mee Hildeburga vel nepote meo Vulgrino" by charter dated 2 Nov 889. m ([825/30]) VULFHARD, son of ---. 
Bego Marquis de Septimanie (I13820)
 
122 “[EYSTEIN “Glumra/Clatterer” . Orkneyinga Saga names “Earl Ivar of the Uplands, father of Eystein the Clatterer…”. Jarl of the Uplanders in Norway [in Kristian and Hedemarken, the area around Oslo]. [Four children:]
i) [RAGNVALD "the Wise" (-[894]). Orkneyinga Saga names “Eystein the Clatterer, father of the wise counsellor Earl Rognwald the Powerful…”. Snorre names Ragnvald Earl of More, a son of Eystein "Glumra" when recording that he had become a supporter of King Harald who had invested him with the districts of North More and Raumsdal. Jarl of North and South Möre and of Raumsdal in Norway.]
ii) [SIGURD "Riki/the Mighty" (-[892], bur Sydero, Dornoch Firth). Orkneyinga Saga records that Ragnvald gave “all the islands” (indicating Shetland and Orkney from the context) to “his brother Sigurd, the forecastleman on King Harald´s ship” and that Harald I "Hårfagre" King of Norway gave “the title of earl” to Sigurd who remained in the islands after the king returned to Norway. Orkneyinga Saga records that Sigurd “joined forces with Thorstein the Red, the son of Olaf the White and Aud the Deep-Minded” and together conquered “the whole of Caithness and a large part of Argyll, Moray and Ross”, Sigurd building “a stronghold…in the south of Moray”. Orkneyinga Saga records that Sigurd defeated and beheaded “Mælbrigte Earl of the Scots” but that he died from an infected wound because a tooth in Mælbrigte´s head, strapped to Sigurd´s saddle, scratched his leg, and was buried “in a mound on the bank of the River Oykel”. The Complete Peerage identifies the place as “Sydero on the Dornoch Firth at the estuary of the Ekkialsbakki. The Complete Peerage dates Sigurd´s appointment as Jarl to [875] and his death to [892], but there seems no basis for either date apart from internal consistency with its reconstruction of events in the lives of this family. Both dates should therefore be considered as extremely approximate, and as noted below the earlier date leads to difficult chonological difficulties with the reported career of Sigurd´s nephew Turf-Einar.] [One child:]
(a) [GUTHORM (-[893]). Orkneyinga Saga records that Sigurd was succeeded by his son “Guthorm who ruled the earldom for a year but died childless”. According to Snorre´s Harald Harfager´s Saga, Sigurd died “without children” but his Saga of Olaf Haraldson names Guthorm as son of Sigurd, recording that he succeeded his father as earl for one year.]
iii) [MALAHULC . Orderic Vitalis (who wrote in [1113]) names Malahulc as an uncle of Rollo and ancestor of the Tosny family. He is not mentioned in the Sagas.]
iv) [SVANHILD. Snorre names "Snahild, a daughter of Earl Eystein" as one of the wives of King Harald. m as his third wife, HARALD I King of Norway, son of HALFDAN "Swarti/the Black" King of Vestfold & his second wife [Ragnhild Sigurdsdatter] ([853/54] or 860-Hogaland 933, 934 or 940, bur "under a mound at Haugar in Karmtsund, near the church in Haugesund").]”«s87» 
Clatterer”, Eystein “Glumra (I15891)
 
123 “[GERAUD (-before [984/93]). Samuel Guichenon, in his Histoire de la Souverainté de Dombes written in 1662, refers to Comte Artaud [I] who lived in 900 and his son Geraud, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. According to Auguste Bernard, Géraud died in 990, but he cites no primary source on which he bases his statement.] m GIMBURGIS, daughter of ---. Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 994 under which "Artaldus comes, Gerardi quondam nobilis viri et Gimbergiæ filius" donated property to Savigny. Géraud & his wife had [six] children:
i) ARTAUD [II] (-[993 or 999] or [11 Oct 1000]). "Artaldus comes, Gerardi quondam nobilis viri et Gimbergiæ filius" donated property "in pago Lugdunensi in ago Cegniacensi…in villa Toriniaco" to Savigny by charter dated 994, subscribed by "Artaldi comitis et uxoris eius Theodebergiæ".
ii) UMFRED . Guichenon cites earlier secondary sources which quote an epitaph (disappeared by 1662 when Guichenon wrote) which records the death in "the year 99" of "Artaudus comes Lugdunensis et comes Forensis et dominus Bellijoci et Umfredus frater eius et mater eorum". The editor of the 1874 edition of Guichenon records yet another version, from "la chronique trouvée à Belleville" which reads "…Artaldus comes Lugd. et Forensis dns Stephanus comes frater eius et Amphredus Bellijojoci dns et pater et frater eorum, obiit dictus Artaldus 993". Guichenon concludes that the epitaph is unlikely to be genuine, based on his supposition that pre-1000 epitaphs are infrequent and that those which exist record only names and titles not the territories ruled.
iii) ETIENNE (-before [984/85]). The editor of the 1874 edition of Guichenon records a version of an epitaph, from "la chronique trouvée à Belleville", which reads "…Artaldus comes Lugd. et Forensis dns Stephanus comes frater eius et Amphredus Bellijoci dns et pater et frater eorum, obiit dictus Artaldus 993".
iv) HUGUES (-after 993). Paradin quotes a charter dated 993 under which “Artaldi comitis” donated property to “l´église de sainct Iregny”, signed by “Artaldi…comitis…coniugis Tetbergiæ, Hugonis abbatis fratris eius, Adelcellina abbatissa”. Abbé d´Ainay.
v) [ADESCELINE . Abbess of Saint-Pierre de Lyon. According to Auguste Bernard, "Adesceline abbesse de Saint-Pierre de Lyon" was the daughter of Gérard Comte de Forez, but he cites no primary source on which he bases his statement.”«s87» 
Geraud (I14345)
 
124 “[IGOR [Ingvar] ([877/79] or [910/20]-killed Iskorosten [=Korosten] [944/46], bur Dereva near Iskorosten). The Primary Chronicle names Igor as son of Rurik, adding that he was "very young" at his father´s death. This suggests a birth date in [[877/79] for consistency with the report about his supposed father´s death in the same source. However, the chronology of Igor´s son Sviatoslav, which is more robust as shown below, suggests that it is more likely that Igor was born in [910/20]0]. The Primary Chronicle records that Igor succeeded (his relative) Oleg in 912, but this chronology is also difficult to sustain. It is probably more accurate to suggest that Igor was established at Kiev by the end of the 930s. The existence of Igor as a historical figure is nevertheless corroborated by Liudprand of Cremona, who records that Rus traders attacked coastal areas near Constantinople in 941 under a "king named Inger", and the De administrando imperio which names his son "Sphendosthlabus Ingor Russiæ principis filius". Franklin & Shepard also refers to an apparently corroborating Khazar text, in which the leader is named 'H-L-G-W' [=Oleg?] and is said to have died in the Caspian region. Oleg negotiated privileged trading terms with Byzantium in [944], the text of which is incorporated into the Primary Chronicle. The main terms of the treaty are corroborated by the De administrando imperio. The Primary Chronicle records that Oleg was killed by Derevlian Slavs, who lived to the north-east of Kiev and were unwilling to submit to his rule. m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40] as shown below. After her husband was killed, the Derevlian Slavs proposed her marriage to their own leader Mal, but the Primary Chronicle records that Olga exacted prompt and effective revenge for her husband's death after besieging the Derevlian capital of Iskorosten. Olga was regent for her son [from 945 to 964]. Her centre of power was based around Kiev where she owned two halls. The Primary Chronicle records that Olga was baptised in Constantinople in [957] by the emperor (Konstantinos VII), and took the name HELENA after the mother of Emperor Konstantinos the Great. She was also in contact with Emperor Otto I in 959. The Primary Chrhronicle records that, during the invasion of the Pechenegs in 968, Olga shut herself in the city of Kiev with her grandsons Yaropolk, Oleg and Vladimir and that she died in 969. She was later esteemed to be a saint, her feast day being 11 July. Igor & his wife had one child:
i) SVIATOSLAV ([935/40]-killed in battle 972). The De administrando imperio names "Sphendosthlabus Ingor Russiæ principis filius". The Primary Chronicle names Svyatoslav as son of Olga. He succeeded his father as leader in Kiev, under the regency of his mother.
b) [---. The precise relationship, if any, between the following individuals and Igor is not known. m ---.] [Two children]:
i) [IGOR. The Primary Chronicle names Igor "nephew of Igor" in the [944] treaty with Byzantium.
ii) [AKUN. The Primary Chronicle names Akun "nephew of Igor" in the [944] treaty with Byzantium, although it is not known whether he shared the same parents with Igor.”«s87» 
Igor or Ingvar of Kiev (I13572)
 
125 “[IVAR . Orkneyinga Saga names “Halfdan the Old, father of Earl Ivar of the Uplands…”.] [One child.]«s87» Ivar (I15894)
 
126 “[LANDRY [I] . It is not known whether Landry was the brother of Bishop Adalger or whether his wife Hildesinde was the bishop's sister. A supporter of Charles "le Chauve" who gave him the chapel of St Aubin in the Mâconnais in 842, which Landrry and his wife gave to the cathedral of Mâcon shortly after, although the dating is unlikely to be correct if they were the parents of Landry [II].] m (before 868) HILDESINDE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Landry [I] & his wife had [one probable child].”«s87» Landry I (I14274)
 
127 “[LANDRY [II] (-922 or after). The Historia Nivernensium Comitum names "Hildegarius episcopus Heduensis" and "nepotem…Landricum". He acquired the castle of Metz-le-Comte from the Duke of Burgundy in [880] after distinguishing himself during itits siege. "Landricus" made a donation by charter dated 11 Sep 910. 918/22. m firstly ADA, daughter of ---. "Ada coniuge Landricus" consented to the charter of "Landricus" dated 11 Sep 910. m secondly EMMA, daughter of ---. "Landrici patris mei, Emme matris mei" are named in the charter of Adalgardis dated 950. The Historia Nivernensium Comitum records that "Hildegarii nepoti Landrico" married "uxore stirpis Andegavorum", although it is not known whether this was his first or second wife.] Landry [II] & his [first/second] wife had two children:
i) LANDRY [III] (-after Nov 950). "Landrici fratris mei" is named in the charter of Adalgardis dated 950. He may have been one of the subscribers "Gisoni, Attoni, Landrici" to the charter dated Nov 950 under which "Bodo" donated property "in pago Matisconense in villa Lanco" acquired from "Rainaldo cognate meo" to Cluny[1069], but this is not certain. Seigneur de Metz-le-Comte.
ii) BODO (-after Nov 950). The Historia Nivernensium Comitum names "Bodonem" as the son of "Hildegarii nepoti Landrico" and his wife "[ex] stirpis Andegavorum", specifying that "Bodo de Montibus" was his godfather and that Bodo built "castellum…Moncellis". Seigneur de Monceaux-le-Comte. "Bodo" donated property "in pago Matisconense in villa Lanco" acquired from "Rainaldo cognate meo" to Cluny "pro receptione filii mei" by charter dated Nov 950, subscribed by "Gisoni, Attoni, Landricici", although it is not certain that this is the same Bodo. Although the identity of "Rainaldo cognate meo" has not been established, the name suggests a family connection with the Comte de Nevers. Settipani suggests that he was related to the Comtes d'Anjou, through Bodo's mother. m ---. The name of Bodo's wife is not known. Bodo & his wife had [two] children:
(a) LANDRY [IV] (-11 May 1028). The Historia Nivernensium Comitum names "Landricus filius Bodonis"[1073]. He was invested in 990 as Comte de Nevers.
(b) [son . He became a monk at Cluny in Nov 950, assuming that "Bodo", who donated property "in pago Matisconense in villa Lanco" acquired from "Rainaldo cognate meo" to Cluny "pro receptione filii mei" by charter of that date, his father is the same as Bodo de Nevers.]
Landry [II] & his second wife had one child:
iii) ADALGARDIS [Adela] (-after 950). She names her parents in her charter dated 950, which also names her brother, husband and three sons. "…Adelæ comitissæ, Milonis comitis filii eius" subscribed the charter dated 8 Sep 975 under which "Adelelmus miles" donated property to Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire for the souls of "genitore meo Rotberto et genitrice mea Bertha et…Burcardo". Bouchard says it is possible to identify Adela, wife of Milo, with the daughter of Humbert I Sire de Salins who was the mother of Wandelmodis and grandmother of Engelbert Comte de Brienne, but this theory is disproved by the charter evidence referred to above. m MILO [I], son of --- (-before 950).” 
Landry II (I14273)
 
128 “[LOTHAR [II] von Stade (-killed in battle near Lenzen an der Elbe 5 Sep 929). No proof has been found that Lothar [II] was the son of Lothar [I] but this looks likely. Thietmar records the death of two of his great grandfathers "both named Liuthar" at the battle of Lenzen 5 Sep.] m SWANEHILD, daughter of --- (-13 Dec ----). The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Graf Lothar [II] & his wife had four children:
a) HENRICH [I] "der Kahle" von Stade (-11 May 976, bur Kloster Heeringen). The paternity of Heinrich is determined from Thietmar recording the death of two of his great grandfathers "both named Liuthar" at the battle of Lenzen 5 Sep. Graf von Stade. He constructed Burg Harsefeld in 964.
b) GERBURG von Stade . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
c) SIEGFRIED [I] von Stade . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Graf von Stade 954/973. "Otto…rex" granted property "Asundorf marcam et Dornsteti marcam Liubissa…in pago Hassigeuui in comitatu comitis Sigiuuridi…loco Biscopstat…in pago Altgeuui in comitatu comitis Uuillihelmi" to "vassallo Billing" by charter dated 23 Apr 961.
d) THIETMAR von Stade (-12 Mar 1001). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Abbot of Corvey 983.”«s87» 
Lothar II Graf von Stade (I15513)
 
129 “[RAYMOND de Toulouse (-[923/24]). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. A bull of Pope John VIII dated 18 Aug 878, relating to papal authority over the monastery of Saint-Gilles, is subscribed by "Raimundus comes, Berengarius vicecomes…Emenus vicecomes, Oddo vicecomes, Ugo comes". "Bligardis femina" donated property "in comitatu Nemausense…villam Bizagum" to Nîmes Notre-Dame by charter dated Apr 892 which names "Raimundus…comes ipsius pagi…Allidulfo suo vicis-comiti". A charter dated 23 May 898 records business in the presence of "Bernardo vices-comite…Regemundo comite…Berengario comite". "Regimundo comite" subscribed a charter dated Jul 902 recording a donation to Nîmes Notre-Damee. A charter dated 18 Jul 915 records business in the presence of "Regemundo comite" and "Daruardus vicecomes Rotenensi" as judge in "Andusie…castello". It is not certain that all these charters refer to the future Raymond II Comte de Toulouse. However, his absence from later records at Nîmes could be explained by his succession in Toulouse soon after 915, after which Nîmes would have ceased to be one of his main centres of activity. No other Comte Raymond has so far been identified who could be this comte de Nîmes. "Ugo comes" who also subscribed the 878 papal bull has not yet been identified. He succeeded his father in [918] as RAYMOND II Comte de Toulouse.] m --- (-[after 28 Sep 926]). The name and origin of the wife of Comte Raymond II are unknown. She may have been GUINIDILDA, daughter of ---, as suggested by the charter dated 28 Sep 926 subscribed by "Vuidinildis comitissa" after "Guifridus, Teudmares, Vualcarius", and before "Richildis vicecomitissa", apparently without her husband's name which suggests that she was then a widow although there is no proof that this is correct. The other subscribing names in the act (Guifré, Richildis) suggest a connection with the family of the Counts of Barcelona. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, she was [Guinidilda] [de Barcelona, daughter of Guifré [I] "el Velloso/el Pilós/the Hairy" Conde de Barcelona & his wife Guinidilda ---]. As Guinidilda was also the name of the wife of Conde Guifré I, a connection seems likely, although it is also possible that "Vuidinildis comitissa" belonged to the same family as Guinidilda senior (about whose family nothing is known either). Comte Raymond II & his wife had one child:
a) [RAYMOND ([900]-after 944, bur Saint-Pons-de-Thomières). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded his father in [923/24] as RAYMOND PONS Comte de Toulouse.]”«s87» 
Raymond II Comte de Toulouse (I13957)
 
130 “[RICHARD Wake (-after [Oct 1174/1182]). The source quoted below shows that Richard was the brother of Geoffrey Wake, but as noted above the parentage of Geoffrey has not been confirmed. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Ricardi Wac, concessu Gaufridi fratris sui…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182].]«s87» WAKE, Richard (I17160)
 
131 “[ROGER Wake (-after 1172). It is assumed that Roger was the brother of Hugh Wake but the relationship has not yet been confirmed by any primary source. "Hugo Wac" founded the abbey of Longues, for the souls of "Bauduini filii Gillberti et Emmmæ filiæ eius uxoris meæ et…liberorum meorum Balduini et Gaufridi, et aliorum", by charter dated 1168, witnessed by "…Rogerio Wac…". Gallia Christiana states that "Rogerius Wac Hugonis germanus" donated property to Notre-Dame de Longues but does not cite the primary source. "…Rogero Wac…" subscribed the charter dated to [1172/89] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the prebends of Saint-Nicolas de Bayeux[829]. "Baudouin de Wac" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues by undated charter, witnessed by ‘Roger Wac’.]”«s87» WAKE, Roger (I14649)
 
132 “[RURIK [Roric] (-[879]). According to the Primary Chronicle 860/62, following a call to "the Varangian Russes [=Scandinavians]…to come to rule and reign over us", Rurik and his two brothers migrated to settle, Rurik the oldest brother settlining in Novgorod. Franklin & Shephard comment that "the story [in the Primary Chronicle]…remains highly controversial". The initial Scandinavian settlements seem to have been at Gorodishche, the town of Novgorod (as its name implies) being a new settlement which was probably established nearby in the 950s. The Primary Chronicle records Rurik´s death in 879. This chronology is dubious when compared with the more robust dates attributable to his supposed grandson Sviatoslav (see below). m ---. The name of Rurik´s wife is not known. Ruril & his wife had [two possible children]:
a) [IGOR [Ingvar] ([877/79] or [910/20]-killed Iskorosten [=Korosten] [944/46], bur Dereva near Iskorosten). The Primary Chronicle names Igor as son of Rurik, adding that he was "very young" at his father´s death. This suggests a birth date in [877/79] for consistency with the report about his supposed father´s death in the same source. However, the chronology of Igor´s son Sviatoslav, which is more robust as shown below, suggests that it is more likely that Igor was born in [910/20]. The Primary Chronicle records that Igor succeeded (his relative) Oleg in 912, but this chronology is also difficult to sustain. It is probably more accurate to suggest that Igor was established at Kiev by the end of the 930s. The existence of Igor as a historical figure is nevertheless corroborated by Liudprand of Cremona, who records that Rus traders attacked coastal areas near Constantinople in 941 under a "king named Inger", and the De administrando imperio which names his son "Sphendosthlabus Ingor Russiæ principis filius". Franklin & Shepard also refers to an apparently corroborating Khazar text, in which the leader is named 'H-L-G-W' [=Oleg?] and is said to have died in the Caspian region. Oleg negotiated privileged trading terms with Byzantium in [944], the text of which is incorporated into the Primary Chronicle. The main terms of the treaty are corroborated by the De administrando imperio. The Primary Chronicle records that Oleg was killed by Derevlian Slavs, who lived to the north-east of Kiev and were unwilling to submit to his rule. m ([930/35]) OLGA [Helga/Haelgha] --- (-969). The Primary Chronicle records that a wife Olga was brought [to Igor] from Pskov in 903. The date is clearly inconsistent with the suggested birth date of their son Sviatoslav in [935/40] as shown below. After her husband was killed, the Derevlian Slavs proposed her marriage to their own leader Mal, but the Primary Chronicle records that Olga exacted prompt and effective revenge for her husband's death after besieging the Derevlian capital of Iskorosten. Olga was regent for her son [from 945 to 964]. Her centre of power was based around Kiev where she owned two halls. The Primary Chronicle records that Olga was baptised in Constantinople in [957] by the emperor (Konstantinos VII), and took the name HELENA after the mother of Emperor Konstantinos the Great. She was also in contact with Emperor Otto I in 959. The Primary Chrhronicle records that, during the invasion of the Pechenegs in 968, Olga shut herself in the city of Kiev with her grandsons Yaropolk, Oleg and Vladimir and that she died in 969. She was later esteemed to be a saint, her feast day being 11 July. Igor & his wife had one child:
i) SVIATOSLAV ([935/40]-killed in battle 972). The De administrando imperio names "Sphendosthlabus Ingor Russiæ principis filius". The Primary Chronicle names Svyatoslav as son of Olga. He succeeded his father as leader in Kiev, under the regency of his mother.
b) [---. The precise relationship, if any, between the following individuals and Igor is not known. m ---.] [Two children]:
i) [IGOR. The Primary Chronicle names Igor "nephew of Igor" in the [944] treaty with Byzantium.
ii) [AKUN. The Primary Chronicle names Akun "nephew of Igor" in the [944] treaty with Byzantium, although it is not known whether he shared the same parents with Igor.”«s87» 
Rurik or Roric (I13574)
 
133 “[TERTULLUS . The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Torquatus sive Tortulfus genuit Tertullum", recording that he was granted property by Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks. Tertullus is no more convincing than Tortulfus as the name of a figure in north-west France during the mid-9th century. As is the case with his supposed father, it is possible that Tertullus was not a historical person. m PETRONILLA, daughter of --- Duke of Burgundy & his wife ---. The Gesesta Consulum Andegavorum records the marriage of "Tertullus nobilem dux" and "ducis Burgundiæ filiam nomine Petronillam". The Chronico Turonensi names "Ingelgerius comes Andergavensis", the couple's son, as "nepos Hugonis Ducis Burgundiæ". The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius…filius eius Fulco cognominatus Rufus", recording that "Hugo Dux Burgundiæ, filius alterius Hugonis" was "ex parte matris suæ [Fulco] consanguineus". The context suggests that "matris suæ" refers to Foulques, although according to other sources the connection was through the mother of Ingelger. No other record has been found of any dukes of Burgundy who could have been related to Petronilla. As with her husband, it is possible that Petronilla and her father were not historical people. Tertullus & his wife had one child:]
a) [INGELGER (-[888], bur Châteauneuf, église Saint-Martin). The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ingelgerius" as son of "Tertullus nobilem dux" & his wife.]
b) [FOULQUES (-after 5 Jul 905). "Ardradus" donated property "in pago Aurelianense" for the soul of "genitoris mei domni Attonis" with the consent of "frater meus Atto" to Saint-Martin d'Angers by charter dated 29 Sep 898, signed by "Ardradi, AAttonis fratris sui vicecomitis…Fulconis vicecomitis". "Fulconis Turononum et Andecavorum vicecomitis…Guernagaudi vicecomitis vel graphionis…" subscribed a charter dated 5 Jul 905 under which "Archambaldus et uxor mea Ingilrada" donated propertrty "in pago Turonico in vicaria Evenense" to Saint-Martin d'Angers. It is unlikely that these two entries refer to Foulques "le Roux", who was Vicomte de Tours et d'Anjou from [909] and was installed as Comte d'Anjou in 929, assuming that it iis correct that he was born in [888] (see below). Nevertheless, his name suggests a close family connection, as also do his titles which subsequently passed to the junior Foulques. It is suggested here that Foulques senior was a younger brother of Ingelger, but this is no more than speculation. It is also possible that he was the ancestor of the later Vicomtes d'Anjou, who are set in Chapter 5 of this document.]”«s87» 
Tertullus or Tertulle (I13243)
 
134 “[TORQUATIUS [Tortulfus] . The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "vir quidam de Armorica Gallia nomine Torquatius…Tortulfus dictus fuit", recording that "genus eius olim ab Armorica iussu Maximi Imperatoris a Britonibus expulsum est". The Historia Comitum Andegavorum specifies that Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks granted Torquatius "forestæ qua Nidus Merulæ…forestarum constituit". The name Torquatius/Tortulfus does not have a convincing ring about it. It is possible that he was not a historical person.]
m ---. The name of Torquatius's wife is not known.
[Torquatius & his wife had one child]”«s87» 
Torquatius or Tortulfus (I13339)
 
135 “[WILLIAM de Tracy . “Willielmo de Tracy, fratre Hugonis de Courtenay, Henrico filio Willielmi de Tracy” subscribed an undated charter under which “Joselinus de Pomerei” donated property to Ford Abbey for the souls of “…domini mei regis Henricii…domini fratris mei Hen. de Pomerei”. It is assumed that this charter should be dated to the reign of King Henry III. If this is correct, it is likely that “Hugonis de Courtenay” was Sir Hugh de Courtenay of Okehampton (died in 1292), although the chronology suggests that William de Tracy´s son must in that case have subscribed the charter when he was still a child.] m ---. The name of William´s son is not known. William & his wife had one child:
i) HENRY de Tracy . “Willielmo de Tracy, fratre Hugonis de Courtenay, Henrico filio Willielmi de Tracy” subscribed an undated charter under which “Joselinus de Pomerei” donated property to Ford Abbey for the souls of “…domini mei regis Henrici…domini fratris mei Hen. de Pomerei”.”«s87» 
William de Tracy (I14265)
 
136 “042649. Holmfrid* PÅLSDATTER(776) (766)(925) (939) (767) was born about 1370 in Norway. She died after 1436 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. Holmfrid Pålsdatter was still alive in 1436, when her husband's property was divided among his heirs.”«s51» PÅLSDTR MÅGE, Helmfrid (I9579)
 
137 “1 May 1820: Enoch Trask’s wife died yesterday morning.”«s95» CARLISLE, Polly (I8063)
 
138 “1042648. Viking* ORMSSON Måge(776) (766)(925) (915)(767) was born about 1370 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. He died before 1436 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. He had an estate probated on 9 Apr 1436 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. Viking Ormsson owned a considerable amount of property in Voss, which he appears to have received through his mother, Gudrid Eilifsdatter. Gudrid and Viking are mentioned together in a document of 1414 concerning the die division of an inheritance between Viking and his uncle. This document, Viking's property holdings in Voss and the fact that one of Viking's sons was named Brynjulv are strong indicators that Gudrid was his mother . Viking appears to have been a wealthy landowner, with property in Voss, Odda, Ullensvang, Kvam, and possibly elsewhere. He was married to Holmfrid* PÅLSDATTER in Norway.(944)”«s51» ORMSSON MÅGE, Viking (I9578)
 
139 “13. JABEZ ATHEARN, (Simonl), b. 10 Oct. 1678, res. T., gentleman, lawyer and Clerk of Courts. He m. (1) KATHERINE BELCHER 30 Nov. 1705; (dau. of Moses and Mary (Nash) Belcher of Braintree, Mass.), who was b. 5 July 1686 and d. 3 Apr. 1752 [She is buried at West Tisbury Village Cemetery]; (2) Mrs. THANKFUL (DAGGETT) (36) BUTLER DAGGETT (wid. of Zephaniah Butler and Brotherton Daggett) who was b. Apr. 1696 and d. 2 July 1766. Jabez Athearn d. 29 Nov. 1761 [and is buried at West Tisbury Village Cemetery.]”

West Tisbury Village Cemetery Stone:

“Here lies Buried
the Body of
JABEZ ATHEARN ESQr.
who departed this
Life November ye 29th
AD 1761
In the 83d Year
of his Age.”«s35» 
ATHEARN, Jabez (I6880)
 
140 “1425 var han (væpnar) i Varberg til vitne saman med J.Axelson Bratt.

Nevnes 1425 og 1452.”«s45» 
HÅKONSSON, Orm (I11348)
 
141 “15. BENJAMIN MANTER, (John1), b. Aug. 1671; res. T., husbandman; m. MARY WHITTEN (22) 4 Apr. 1695, who was b. 13 May 1674 and d. 13 Aug. 1750. [She is buried at West Tisbury Village Cemetery.] He d. 15 July 1750 and his will 3 July 1733 was pro. 10 Aug. 1750. He was deacon of the church in W.T., and a wealthy citizen of the town, his est. being appraised at £9947-8-6.”

West Tisbury Village Cemetery Stone:

“Here Lyes Buried
ye Body of Deacon
BENJAMIN MANTER
Who Departed this
Life July 15th 1750 Aged
78 Years & 11 Months.”«s35» 
MANTER, Deacon Benjamin (I6680)
 
142 “16682368. Sigurd på* HÅHEIM (939)(915) (767) was born about 1270 in Håheim, Ulvik, Hordaland, Norway. He died after 1333 in Håheim, Ulvik, Hordaland, Norway. Sigurd Håheim is mentioned in a document dated 29 March 1333 at Vang in Voss in which he exchanged a farm called Auldin (valued at 2 månedsmatabol) for property at Frøym and Indre Kvitno. The latter farm provides evidence that Sigurd was the progenitor of the Måge family since it was mentioned in the probate after Viking Ormsson Måge in 1436. The only other document in which Sigurd is mentioned is one from 10 Sep 1347 in which his son, Salamon Sigurdsson Måge, bequeathed some property to the Ullensvang church in exchange for masses to be said for the souls of his deceased parents and brothers. There has been some research and speculation concerning Sigurd Håheim's ancestry. Based on the names that often appeared among his descendants (such as Orm, Sigurd and Brynjulf) there could be some connection to the well-known Aga family.”«s51» ORMSSON MÅGE, Sigurd (I9586)
 
143 “170595. Ingebjørg* SIMONSDATTER (915)(767) was born about 1325 in Norway. She died after 1365 in Voss, Hordaland, Norway. Ingebjørg Simonsdatter was married three times and appears to have come from a very wealthy family in Voss. At least two of her husbands were prominent landowners. On 28 May 1365, Ingebjørg was given several properties by her daughter and her husband. These included 10 månadsmatabol at Spildo, 4 månadsmatabol at Teigen in Jondal and an apple orchard at Hausatveit in Ullensvang. She and her husband were also given the right to occupy and operate the farm Tolo in Kvam for as long as they lived.”«s51» SIMONSDTR, Ingebjørg (I9841)
 
144 “2085296. Orm* SIGURDSON Måge(939) (915)(767) was born about 1350 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. He died before 1414 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. There are no written records concerning Orm. He is assumed to have been the link between Viking Ormsson Måge and Sigurd Ormsson Måge. Orm must have died before 1414. The identity of his wife is not known for sure, but there are reasons to believe that she was Gudrid Eilifsdaughter from Voss. He was married to Gudrid* EILIFSDATTER in Norway. (915)”«s51» SIGURDSSON MÅGE, Orm (I9582)
 
145 “2085297. Gudrid* EILIFSDATTER (915)(767) was born about 1355 in Voss, Hordaland, Norway. She died after 1414 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. Gudrid Eilifsdatter is known from a document of 1414 concerning the division of an inheritance between her son and his uncle. She had the two shake hands and swear to uphold the terms of the agreement.”«s51» EILIVSDTR FINNE, Gudrid (I9583)
 
146 “21324. Ivar* VIKINGSSON Lydvo(776) (766)(925) (939)(767) was born about 1390 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. He died after 1436 in Lydvo gård #37, Voss, Hordaland, Norway. Ivar Vikingsson inherited Skjelde in Voss from his father. However, he probably lived at Lydvo, which he may have obtained from his wife's family. Besides Skjelde, he owned Lindvik and part of Rogdo in Ullensvang, a portion of Furenes (Edna) in Odda and all of Skeie in Kvam.”«s51» VIKINGSSON, PÅ MÅGE OG SKJELDE, Ivar (I9577)
 
147 “260662. Orm* IVARSSON Måge (776) (766)(925) (767) was born about 1415 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. He was living about 1440 in Lydvo gård #37, Voss, Hordaland, Norway. He died before 1497 in Lydvo gård #37, Voss, Hordaland, Norway. Orm Ivarsson inherited his father's property in Voss and lived at the Lydvo farm. He is named at Voss between 1455 and 1472 and must have died sometime prior to 1497, when his wife received her inheritance from the Torsnes estate. He was married to Gyrid* BÅRDSDATTER Torsnes about 1450 in Norway. (933)”

“Bosatt på Lydvo.
Orm Ivarson på Lydvo er umtala 1455-1472 og er i 1466-72 ofte nemnd som lagrettemann på Voss. Ein veit um to born etter han, Ivar og Ingerid (Så da lurer jeg litt på hvem Gudrun og Astrid er???). Brev frå 1538, 1571og 1572 tyder på at dei var fødde på Voss.”«s45», «s51» 
IVARSSON PÅ LYDVO, Orm (I9352)
 
148 “260663. Gyrid* BÅRDSDATTER Torsnes(766) (902) (776)(767) was born about 1425 in Torsnes gård #36, Jondal, Hordaland, Norway. She was christened about 1425 in Hardanger, Norway. She died after 1497 in Lydvo gård #37, Voss, Hordaland, Norway. GyGyrid and her sister, Herbert, were the heirs of a very large estate in and around Hardanger. A probate was held on 4 Mar 1497 to distribute property at 43 different farms between the two sisters (including the farm Bratte in Shetland). The total value of this estate has been estimated at 84 laupar. They appear to have been descended from several prominent families of the lower nobility (lågadel), which is roughly equivalent to the "landed gentry" of England. Several these families died out in the 1400's, which resulted in a great deal of property passing to Gyrid and Herborg's parents, Bård Sigurdsson Torsnes and Gyrid Torbergsdatter Store Brandvik. The 1497 probate was held after several court cases which confirmed that the two sisters were the rightful heirs to the property in question.”

“På Torsnes nevnt i 1491.
(I følge Norsk Slektshistorisk Tidsskrift B. II s. 153-167)

Gyrid Bårdsdatter hadde også vært gift med Asbjørn Gran på Meløen i Helgeland. Gyrid og hennes søster Herborg holdt skifte mellom seg omkring år 1497. Der ble det delt en mengde gårder og gårdsparter i Hardanger og noen i Ryfylke, samt gården Bratte på Shetland. Kilde: http://www.home.no/torerlan/rustung.htm”«s45», «s51» 
BÅRDSDTR GALTE PÅ TORSNES, Gyrid (I9353)
 
149 “32. GEORGE MANTER, (Benjamin,2 John1), b. 26 Mch. 1702; res. T., yeoman; m. KATHERINE ATHEARN (20) 17 Nov. 1726, who was b. 23 Apr. 1708 and d. 8 July 1754. He d. 13 Jan. 1766 and his will 13 June 1759 was pro. 6 Mch. 1766. He served in the Militia co. of T. 1757. “«s35» MANTER, George (I6869)
 
150 “4170594. Eilif* BRYNJULFSSON Finne(915) (954)(939) (767) was born about 1325 in Voss, Hordaland, Norway. He was buried about 1380 in Voss, Hordaland, Norway. Eilif Brynjulfsson was a wealthy landowner who inherited property in Hardanger and VoVoss from his father and appears to have acquired additional property in Voss through his wife. He is mentioned in documents from 1371 and 1380 when he sold a farm and apple orchard at Lofthus in Ullensvang to Sigurd Måge. Eilif married Ingebjørørg Simonsdatter, the widow of a wealthy member of the Finne family, around 1359 and lived at that farm Eilif might have been descended from the ancient Aga family as the paternal grandson of Svein Brynjulvsson (named 1317). Another possibilty is that his father was Brynjulv Brynjulvsson, named at Vang in Voss in 1331. He was married to Ingebjørg* SIMONSDATTER about 1355 in Voss, Hordaland, Norway. (915)”«s51» BRYNJULFSSON FINNE, Eilif (I9840)
 
151 “544. Lieut. James Nash. Occupation: shoemaker.

"Lieut. James Nash of Weymouth, shoemaker, appeared with a wife Alice, and was made a freeman of Massachusetts Bay Colony in May, 1645. He was a representative from Weymouth, 1665, 1666, and 1667. Administration of his estate was granted to his sons John Nash of Boston, cooper, and Jacob Nash of Weymouth, housewright, 31 Dec 1680."89

Robert Charles Anderson and Richard H. Benson concur that the Samuel Nash of Weymouth, shoemaker, was James Nash, and he was in Weymouth in 1641. James Nash appeared in the records of Weymouth when a description of his land was included on an undated list written between 26 Oct 1642 and 21 May 1644.

James and Alice lived alternately between Weymouth and Boston. He owned land in Boston as early as 1645, and on 7 Jun 1648 purchased a parcel of marsh land along Mill Creek there. Their home was on Hanover Street at Mill Creek. James owned a whaarf 'on the East Side of Mill Creek near the bridge.' He owned a sloop and probably sailed it between Weymouth and Boston. At one time he owned 29 acres of land in Braintree which was bought by John Whitman of Weymouth, and later sold in 1748. In 1650 James purchased lands including a house, garden and orchards from James Waterman in Marshfield, but sold part or all of it the next year. He sold some of his Boston property in 1654 and 1664, the year he purchased 20 acres of land north of the common in Weymouth from Edmund Hart. He continued to buy and sell land until the year of his death.

James was captain of the Weymouth militia, and he served as a representative from Weymouth to the General Court of Massachusetts in 1655 and from 1662 to 1667.

On 1 Feb 1633 James married Alice Higgins, at Great Hampden, Buckinghamshire, Eng.Alice died aft 20 Apr 1680.

Richard H. Benson argues convincingly that the Alice who was James Nash's wife was not Alice Burges, the daughter of Robert and Alice Burges, who is frequently listed as the wife of James, but Alice Higgins.”, 
NASH, Lieutenant James (I7700)
 
152 “8341184. Orm* SIGURDSON Måge(939) (915)(767) was born about 1295 in Håheim, Ulvik, Hordaland, Norway. He died before 1347 in Måge #47, Ullensvang, Hordaland, Norway. Orm Sigurdsson is mentioned in a document issued by his brother, Salamon Sigurdsson in 1347. Salamon gave some property in Jordal to the Ullensvang church in exchange for masses to be said for the souls of his deceased parents and brothers on their birthdays. Orm's ancestors probably came from Håheim in Ulvik and his descendants lived at Måge in Ullensvang. It is possible that Orm, himself, was born at Håheim and later lived at Måge, although that is far from certain.”«s51» SIGURDSSON MÅGE, Orm (I9585)
 
153 “A Magna Carta Surety.”

“HUGH Bigod, son of ROGER Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Ida --- (-[11/18] Feb 1225). “Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ” donated property to Colne priory, for the souls of “Hugone Bigot fratris mei et comitissæ Julianæ matris meæ et Idæ uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “Hugone Bigot filio meo…”. He succeeded his father in 1221 as Earl of Norfolk. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo Bigot comes” died in 1225. The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1225 of “Hugo Bigot comes Norfolchiæ”.
m ([before Lent] 1207) as her first husband, MAUD Marshal of Pembroke, daughter of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel Ctss of Pembroke (-27 Mar 1248). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Matilda…Johaanna…Isabella” as the daughters of “Willielmi Marescalli comitis Penbrochiæ”, adding that Matilda married “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and secondly “Johanni de Garrene comiti de Surrey”. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Hugo Bigot comes…uxor” married “comiti Warenniæ”. She married secondly William de Warenne Earl of Surrey, and thirdly Walter de Dunstanville. The primary source which confirms her third marriage has not yet been identified.
Earl Hugh & his wife had five children:
1. ROGER Bigod ([1212/13]-4 Jul 1270, bur Thetford 10 Jul 1270). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Hugo Bigod primus filius, comes Norfolke et Suffolke, et Rogerus sive Radulfus secundus filius” as the children of “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and his wife, although this reverses the order of birth of the two sons. He succeeded his father in 1225 as Earl of Norfolk. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "die Translationis Sancti Martini" [4 Jul] of "Rogerus Bigod comes Norfol. et Suff. marescallus Angliæ, Cuhabe" and his burial "apud Thetford monachorum". The Annals of Osney record the death “V Non Jul” in 1270 of “Rogerus Bigod marescallus Angliæ”. m ((Alnwick May 1225, repudiated 1245 on grounds of consanguinity, compelled to cohabit again by ecclesiastical sentence 1253259) ISABEL of Scotland, daughter of WILLIAM "the Lion" King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (-after 1253, bur Church of the Black Friars, London). She is called "filiam regis Scotiæ" (but not named) by Matthew of Paris when he records her husband's resumption of their marriage. She appears to have been living in Gloucestershire in Oct 1263.
2. HUGH Bigod (-before 7 May 1266). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Hugo Bigod primus filius, comes Norfolke et Suffolke, et Rogerus sive Radulfus secundus filius” as the children of “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norforfolke et Suffolke” and his wife, although this reverses the order of birth of the two sons. Chief Justiciar of England 1257. m (after 1241) as her second husband, JOAN de Stuteville, widow of HUGH Wake, daughter of NICHOLAS [II] de Stuteville & his wife Devorguilla of Galloway (-before 6 Apr 1276). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Hugh & his wife had three children:
a) ROGER Bigod (-6 Dec 1306). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester names "Rogerum filium Hugonis Bigod fratris eiusdem defuncti" when recording that he succeeded his paternal uncle as Earl of Norfolk He succeeded his uncle in 1270 as Eararl of Norfolk. “Rogerus le Bigod comes Norfolciæ” donated property to Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire by charter dated 4 Aug 1301, witnessed by ”domino Johanne le Bygod fratre meo, domino Johanne de Bygod de Stocton…”. The earldom reverted to thhe crown on his death, under the terms of a re-grant for life agreed 12 Apr 1302. m firstly (before 29 Oct 1271) as her second husband, ALINE Basset, widow of Sir HUGH Le Despencer, daughter and heiress of Sir PHILIP Basset of Wycombe, Berkshire & his first wife Hawise de Lovaine (-before 11 Apr 1281). The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. m secondly (1290) ALIX de Hainaut, daughter of JEAN II Comte de Hainaut [later JAN II Count of Holland] & his wife Philippine de Luxembourg (-26 Oct 1317). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage of "Rogerus Bigot comes Norfolchiæ et marescallus Angliæ" and "Aliciam filiam Johannis de Areynes comitis Agennogiæ".
b) Sir JOHN Bigod . “Rogerus le Bigod comes Norfolciæ” donated property to Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire by charter dated 4 Aug 1301, witnessed by ”domino Johanne le Bygod fratre meo, domino Johanne de Bygod de Stocton…”. His brother settled on him, his wife and two sons, the manor of Settrington, Yorkshire 25 Apr 1302. He was unable to succeed to the Earldom of Norfolk which had been re-granted to his brother Roger in 1302 only for the latter's life. m ISABEL, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Sir John & his wife had two children:
i) JOHN Bigod of Settrington, Yorkshire. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
ii) ROGER Bigod . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
c) JOAN Bigod . A manuscript genealogy of the Gant family records that “Philippus de Kyme” married “Hugoni Bigot…filiam suam”. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. m PHILIP de Kyme Lord Kyme, son of WILLIAM de Kyme & his wife Lucy de Ros (-1323 before 2 Apr).
3. Sir RALPH Bigod . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
4. WILLIAM Bigod . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
5. ISABEL Bigod . The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. m firstly GILBERT de Lacy, of Ewyas Lacy, Herefordshire, son of WALTER de Lacy Lord of Meath & his wife --- (-[12 Aug/25 Dec] 1230, bur Lanton, Wales). m secondly Sir JOHN FitzGeoffrey, son of GEOFFREY FitzPiers Earl of Essex & his second wife Aveline de Clare (-1258). Justiciar of Ireland.” 
BIGOD, Hugh 3rd Earl of Norfolk (I15748)
 
154 “A Magna Carta Surety.”

From Foundation for Medieval Genealogy:
"ROGER Bigod ([1212/13]-4 Jul 1270, bur Thetford 10 Jul 1270). The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Hugo Bigod primus filius, comes Norfolke et Suffolke, et Rogerus sive Radulfus secundus filius” as the children of “Hugoni le Bigod comiti Norfolke et Suffolke” and his wife, although this reverses the order of birth of the two sons. He succeeded his father in 1225 as Earl of Norfolk. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "die Translationis Sancti Martini" [4 Jul] of "Rogerus Bigod comes Norfol. et Suff. marescallus Angliæ, Cuhabe" and his burial "apud Thetford monachorum". The Annals of Osney record the death “V Non Jul” in 1270 of “Rogerus Bigod marescallus Angliæ”. m ((Alnwick May 1225, repudiated 1245 on grounds of consanguinity, compelled to cohabit again by ecclesiastical sentence 1253259) ISABEL of Scotland, daughter of WILLIAM "the Lion" King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (-after 1253, bur Church of the Black Friars, London). She is called "filiam regis Scotiæ" (but not named) by Matthew of Paris when he records her husband's resumption of their marriage. She appears to have been living in Gloucestershire in Oct 1263."

From Wikipedia:
"Roger Bigod (c. 1209–1270) was 4th Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England.

He was the eldest son and heir of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk (1182-1225) by his wife Maud, a daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147-1219), Marshal of England. His younger brother was Hugh Bigod (1211-1266), Justiciar. After the death of his father in 1225, the young Roger became the ward of William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury.

In 1228, although still under-age but by now married and in a second wardship to Alexander II of Scotland following his 1225 marriage to Alexander's sister Isabella, he succeeded to his father's estates including Framlingham Castle. He did not, however, receive his father's title until 1233.

After the death without male heirs of the last of his mother's brothers, in 1246 Roger inherited the office of Marshal of England. Together with his younger brother Hugh Bigod (1211-1266), Justiciar, he was prominent among the barons who wrested control of government from the hands of King Henry III and assisted Simon de Montfort in the Second Barons' War.

His first warder married him to Isabella of Scotland, daughter of William the Lion, King of Scotland, whereupon still under-age he became a ward of his new brother-in-law, Alexander II of Scotland until 1228.

Roger had no children, and was succeeded by his nephew Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk (1245-1306)." 
BIGOD, Roger 4th Earl of Norfolk, Marshal of England (I15750)
 
155 “A Magna Carta Surety.” DE CLARE, Gilbert 7th Earl of Hertford (I13172)
 
156 “A Magna Charta Surety”

“HENRY de Bohun, son of HUMPHREY de Bohun, hereditary Constable of England & his wife Margaret of Huntingdon (-1 Jun 1220, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Henricus de Bohun comes Hereford et constabularius Angliæ” as son of “dominus Humfridus quartus de Bohun, comes Herefordiæ et constabularius Angliæ” and his wife “Margaretam comitissam Britanniæ”. He succeeded his father as hereditary Constable of England. He inherited the principal estates of the former Earls of Hereford, through his paternal grandmother. He was created Earl of Hereford at Porchester 28 Apr 1200. He was one of the 25 barons appointed to secure the observance of Magna Carta in 1215, and after the death of King John supported Louis de France when he invaded England. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln 20 May 1217. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the death in 1220 of "Henricus de Boum comes Herefordensis". A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus de Bohun” died 1 Jun 1220 and was buried at Lanthony.
m as her first husband, MAUD de Mandeville, daughter of GEOFFREY FitzPiers Earl of Essex & his first wife Beatrice de Say (-27 Aug 1236). The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Galfridus…Willielmus cognomina Mandavilla…et Matildis, Humfrido de Bohun comiti Herefordiæ maritata” as children of “domino Galfrido filio Petri” & his wife. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus de Bohun” married “Matildem filiam et hæredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexiæ”. She married secondly (before 1227, divorced before 24 Apr 1233, divorce revoked before Jul 1236) Roger de Daunteseye of Dauntsey, Wiltshire. She succeeded her brother, William de Mandeville Earl of Essex, in 1227 as Ctss of Essex, suo iure. The Annals of Dunstable record that “comitissa Herfordiæ” died in 1236.
Earl Henry & his wife had three children:
1. HUMPHREY de Bohun (-24 Sep 1275, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum dde Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordiæ” and his wife “Matildi”. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” as sons of “Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam et hæredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexiæ”. He succeeded his father in 1220 as Earl of Hereford, hereditary Constable of England. He had livery of his mother's lands 9 Sep 1236, thereby succeeding as Earl of Essex. He supported Henry III King of England against the barons in 1263/64. m firstly MATHILDE de Lusignan, daughter of RAOUL de Lusignan Comte d'Eu & his wife Alice d'Eu (-14 Aug 1241, bur Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ” married firstly “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that she died “in vigilia assumptionis beatæ Mariæ” and was buried in Lanthony. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “circa Assumptionem beatæ Mariæ” in 1241 of “comitissa Herefofordiæ” and her burial “apud Lentoniam juxta Gloucestriam”. m secondly MAUD de Avenbury, daughter of --- (-Sorges, Gascony 8 Oct 1273, bur Sorges, transferred 1290 to Lanthony Priory, Gloucester). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Humfredus quintus de Bohun” married secondly “Matildem de Avenbury”, adding that she died 8 Oct 1273 “apud Sorgee in Gasconia” where she was buried, her son transferring her body to Lanthony 17 years after her death. Earl Humphrey & his first wife had five children:
a) HUMPHREY de Bohun (-Beeston Castle, Cheshire 27 Oct 1265, bur Combermere Abbey). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “dominus Humfredus sextus de Bohun, dominus de Brekenok” as the son of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”.
b) MAUD de Bohun (-Groby, Lincolnshire 20 Oct 1252, bur Brackley). The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordiæ” and his wife “Matildi”. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis..Alicia” as the first two of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for HHumfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that Matilda married “Ancelmo filio et hæredi Willielmi le Mareschall”. m firstly ANSELM Marshal, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke (-Chepstow [22/24] Dec 1245, bur Tintern Abbey). He succeeded his brother in 1245 as Earl of Pembroke. m secondly (before 5 Jun 1250) as his second wife, ROGER de Quincy Earl of Winchester, son of SAHER de Quincy Earl of Winchester & his wife Margaret of Leicester (-25 Apr 1264, bur [Brackley]).
c) ALICE . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Matildis..Alicia” as the first two of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia”, adding that Alice married “domino de Thonye” and was buried at Lanthony. m ROGER de Tosny, son of .
d) [daughter . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that the third of the four daughters of “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia” married “domino de Quincy”. This may represent confusion with the second marriage of this supposed daughter´s sister Maud to Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester (see above).]
e) [daughter . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that “Henricus [mistake for Humfredus] quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam comitis de Ewe in Normannia” had four daughters.]
Earl Humphrey & his second wife had one child:
f) JOHN de Bohun of Haresfield . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannem de Bohun, dominum de Haresfeld, patrem domini Edmundi de Bohun” as the son of “Humfredus quintus de Bohun” and his second wife “Matildem de Avenbury”. He performed the office of Constable of England in 1282 when his nephew Humphrey was confined to Brecknock. m ---. The name of John´s wife is not known. John & his wife had one child:
i) EDMUND de Bohun . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannem de Bohun, dominum de Haresfeld, patrem domini Edmundi de Bohun”. m MATILDA de Segrave, daughter of NICHOLAS de Segrave Baron of Stowe, Staffordshire & his wife ---.
2. HENRY de Bohun . The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordiæ” and his wife “Matildi”. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Humfredus quintus de Bohun comes Hereford et Essex et constabularius Angliæ et dominus Henricus de Bohun” as sons of “Henricus de Bohun” and his wife “Matildem filiam et hæredem domini Galfridi filii Petri comitis Essexiæ”, adding that Henry died young.
3. RALPH de Bohun . The History of the foundation of Walden abbey names “Matilidis filia sua, Humfredus filius suus primogenitus, Henricus et Radulfus fratres eius” as children of “Humfridum de Bohun filium domini Henrici de Bohun comitis Herefordiæ” and his wife “Matildi”.”«s87» 
DE BOHUN, Henry 1st Earl of Hereford (I11634)
 
157 “ADALBERT [Albert] [I], son of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adela [Capet] (-8 Sep 987). Flodoard names "Adalbertus filius Heriberti". Under the division of territories organised after his father's death in 943, he became Comtte de Vermandois. Comte Albert re-established the abbey of Homblières and built Mont-Saint-Quentin. When his brother Hugues was deposed as archbishop of Reims in 948, Comte Albert gave up the family's struggle with Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France and swore allegiance to the king. He opposed the election of Hugues Capet as king of France, but eventually submitted. The Chronique de Hugues de Fleury records that "Adalbert, fils du comte Héribert" swore allegiance to King Louis IV.
[m firstly HERESINDE, daughter of ---. According to the Histoire de Guise, Comte Albert constructed the abbey of Saint-Michel at Rochefort in 945 "d'accord avec la comtesse Hérésinde sa femme", while in 947 Hérésinde founded the nearby Benedictine convent of Bucilly. The source assumes that this refers to Albert Comte de Vermandois, but his supposed first marriage is not mentioned by Settipani. According to the introduction to the Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Bucilly, Bucilly was foundounded by "Gerberge, femme d'Albert I Comte de Vermandois" although it notes that "certains auteurs ont voulu faire remonter [sa foundation] à la libéralité de Hersinde femme d'Herbert Comte de Vermandois morte en 901". The Cartulaire reproduceces a French translation of a declaration by Barthélemy Bishop of Laon dated 1120 entitled "Privilegium de domino Elberto, Viromandensi comite" according to which the bishop declares that he has read the original charter under which "Elbert comtmte de Vermandois…et sa femme Gertrude [error for Gerberge]" founded Bucilly. Further research in the original charter documentation is needed to clarify this confusion, not the least of which is that, even if Hérésinde was not the wife of Comte Albert, no other reference has been found to her being the wife of Comte Héribert [I] (see above).]
m [secondly] ([949/54]) GERBERGA, daughter of GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia & his wife Gerberga of Germany ([935]-after 7 Sep 978). Settipani names her as the wife of Comte Albert, and gives her parentage, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based. A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage more precisely has not yet been identified.
Comte Albert & his [second] wife had [four] children:
1. HERIBERT [IV] ([954]-29 Aug [993]).
2. OTTO ([950/55]-after 2 Nov [958/59]). "Ottonem, Alberti Vermandensium comitis filium" is named in the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium. A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew. Otto is named with his parents in a ccharter of Comte Adalbert dated 2 Nov [958/59]. same person as…? OTTO (-[986/87] or after). There appears to be no direct proof that Otto, ancestor of the Comtes de Chiny, was the same person as Otto, son of Adalbert Comte de Vermandois. The Historia Monasterii Mosomense records that "Ottonem comitem" built "castellum…Warcus" (Warcq, Ardennes) in 971, and suggests his affiliation when, in a later passage, it clarifies that "superius dictus Ottho erat comes, Otthonum…Romanorum imperatorum…germanissima progenies". The editor of the MGH SS edition of the Historia identifies Otto with the son of Adalbert Comte de Vermandois and Gerberge, daughter of Emperor Otto I's sister. A subsequent passage of the Historia dates the foundation of the monastery to 24 Jul 971, implying that the events recorded earlier in the text predated this foundation. If this is correct, 971 seems early for Otto de Vermandois to have constructed Warcq in light of his estimated birth date (which appears reasonably robust). Gerbert, in a letter dated to Oct 986, records that "dux Cono pro suo Ottone insidias molitur". In the same letter, he also records that "Laudunensis episcopus" left "Dordingum" (Dourdon?) on the advice of "Ottonis et Heriberti" in support of "ducem" (which appears to refer to Hugues Capet). Settipani suggests that "Otto" in this text refers to the holder of Warcq. However, all other passages in Gerbert's letters which name "Ottonis et Heriberti" (in that order) appear to refer to Eudes I Comte de Blois and his first cousin Héribert [V] Comte de Troyes. It is unclear from the full text of this letter whether "Ottone" and "Ottonis" relate to the same person. "Dux Cono" has not been identified, although it may refer to Konrad I Duke of Swabia. If this is correct, it is possible that the first "Ottone" is a different person from the second "Ottonis" as there is no other passage which links the Blois count to the Swabian duke. Settipani states that Otto died "between 986 and 987", without specifying the basis for this speculation.
3. LIUDOLF ([957]-before 9 Nov 986). A list of members of the Cathedral of Paris lists (in order) "Albertus comes, Girberga comitissa, Harbertus, Otto, Lewultus, Girbertus, Gondrada, Ricardus, Harbertus comes…", the first four individuals named apparently being Comte Albert, his wife and three sons, and the last named maybe his brother or nephew. Appointed Bishop of Noyon 978, consecrated 979.
4. [ELEONORE . According to the Histoire de Guise, "Gauthier de Saint-Aubert avait épousé vers 986 une sœur du comte de Vermandois…Eleonore", the author speculating on the possibility of a relationship between Gauthier de Saint-Aubert and the later Seigneurs de Guise. No other reference has been found to this couple. m ([986]) GAUTHIER de Saint-Aubert, son of ---.”«s87» 
Adalbert I or Albert Count of Vermandois (I12622)
 
158 “ADALBERTO di Ivrea ([932/936]-Autun 30 Apr 971[592]). Liudprand names "Adalbertus" as son of "Berengarius". His father installed him in 951 as ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy. When Otto I King of Germany invaded Italy in 962, Adalberto retreated with his brother Guido to fortresses near Lakes Como and Garda. Conspiring with Pope John XII, he entered Rome in Oct 963 but was put to flight by Emperor Otto in the following month, along with Pope John whom Otto deposed for his betrayal. Adalberto wandered the Mediterranean for three years unsuccessfully attempting to find support, and eventually retired to lands in the valley of the Saône. m (before [960/62]) as her first husband, GERBERGE, daughter of --- & his wife Adélaïde [de Bourgogne] ([945]-11 Dec [986/991]). Her name and her two marriages are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, which names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that her son was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus". Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date of her son in [960/62]. The Vita of Hugues Comte de Chalon refers to his (unnamed) sister as having married the Duke of Burgundy. Chronologically, this refers most probably to Duke Henri who died in 1002, although the original of this document has not yet been consulted to check whether the wording supports this conclusion. Gerrberge's origin has not yet been corroborated in the other primary sources so far consulted. The Vita appears to indicate that she was Gerberge, daughter of Lambert Comte de Chalon, but this raises several problems if it is correct. Firstly, on the death without direct heirs in 1039 of her supposed brother Hugues Comte de Chalon, the county was inherited by the comparatively obscure children of his younger sister Mathilde, apparently ignoring the superior claims of Gerberge's own numerous descendants, among whom were the powerful counts palatine of Burgundy who, one would have thought, would not have missed the opportunity of acquiring another county. Rodulfus Glaber does record that "Hugo filius Lanberti Cabilonensis comitis…episcopus Autissioderi" was an opponent of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius"[596], which could explain why Bishop Hugues favoured his nephew by his younger sister to succeed to his county. Nevertheless, after the bishop's death, his past opposition to Comte Otto-Guillaume may have provided an excuse for his son to intervene in the Chalon succession if he had a legitimate claim. Secondly, considering the likely birth date of her son, Gerberge's first marriage must have taken place while her husband and father-in-law were still reigning kings of Italy. They were under continuous pressure from Otto I King of Germany and it is likely that Adalberto's marriage could have brought additional political support. It is not clear how the relatively obscure count of Chalon could have provided this. Thirdly, after the death in 978 of Lambert Comte de Chalon, and his widow's second marriage to Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, no record haas been found in the primary sources so far consulted of Henri Duke of Burgundy intervening to prevent Comte Geoffroy taking control of the county of Chalon, which would seem the likely course of action if his wife was the deceased count's oldest child. Fourthly, Gerberge's estimated birth date creates serious chronological problems if she was the daughter of Lambert's only known wife Adelais. Considerable doubt therefore appears to subsist on this origin of Gerberge, although no alternative can as yet be proposed if we are to respect the wording of the Vita. She married secondly Henri Duke of Burgundy [Capet]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 11 Dec of "Gerberga comitissa uxor Henrici ducis". Adalberto & his wife had [two] children:
a) GUGLIELMO di Ivrea ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026). Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother with no small cunning by a certain monk. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014. It is assumed from this that he was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy. The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberiic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus". He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded as OTHON [I] Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife.
b) [WILLIBIRG. Jackman suggests that the mother of Hunifried canon at Strasbourg was the daughter of Adalberto associate King of Italy. He bases this on onomastic reasons, in particular the importation of the Ivrean name Berengar into the famimily of Liutold and the use of "Willa" among the ancestors of Adalbert King of Italy. However, another origin is suggested by the necrology of Zwiefalten which records the death "XIV Kal Dec" of "Unruoch proavus Liutoldi comitis". If this greagreat grandfather were the father of Willibirg, it may also explain how the name Berenger entered the family, assuming Unruoch was related to the Unruochingi Counts of Friulia. m LIUTOLD Graf im Sundgau, son of KONRAD Duke of Swabia [Konradiner] & his wife Richlint of Germany.]”«s87» 
Adalbert or Adalberto King of Italy (I13305)
 
159 “ADALBERTO di Ivrea, son of ANSCARIO I Marchese di Ivrea & his wife [Volsia di Susa] (-[17 Jul 923/8 Oct 924]). He succeeded his father [898/902] as ADALBERTO I Conte e Marchese di Ivrea. He rebelled against Berengario I King of Italy in 896, supporting the rival candidate Louis III King of Provence as King of Italy. After the defeat of the latter in 905, Adalberto was exiled across the Alps back to Burgundy. He rebelled a second time against Berengario in alliance with Lambert Archbishop of Milan, this time in support of Rudolf II King of Burgundy-Transjurania, another rival candidate for the Italian throne. Initially defeated, he and Rudolf finally defeated Berengario at Firenzuola 29 Jul 923.”«s87» Adalberto I Conte e Marches d’Ivrea (I13855)
 
160 “ADALHARD ([830]-after 890). His parentage is established by the charter dated 2 Nov 889 under which "Vulfardus" donated property to Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire for the souls of "genitoris mei Vulfardi et genetrice mea Susannane necnon et germanorum fratrum meorum Adelardo, Vulgrino, Ymo et sorore mee Hildeburga vel nepote meo Vulgrino". He inherited the villa Sennecey from his maternal uncle comte Eberhard. Comte 875. Comte palatin 877. Comte de Paris [885]. m ---. The name of Adalhard's wife is not known. Adalhard & his wife had two children:
i) VULFARD ([855]-6 Sep [880/93]). Vulfhard is named sororius of King Louis II. The source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He founded the Benedictine abbey of Flavigny. Abbé de Flavigny 875.
ii) ADELAIS ([855/60]-18 Nov [901], bur Compiègne, église abbatiale Saint-Corneille). Regino names "Adalheidis" second wife of "Hludowicus rex filius Caroli", stating that he married her after repudiating his first wife. Her paternity is indicated by Vulfhard (who would have been the brother of Adelais) being named sororius of King Louis II. Her marriage was not recognised by the church which did not accept her husband's separation from his first wife. The Pope refused to crown Adelais with her husband at Troyes 878, considering that she was not his legitimate wife. Her children were considered illegitimate by the church. m ([875]) as his second wife, LOUIS King of Aquitaine, son of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d'Orléans] (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 10 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille). He succeeded his father in 875 as LOUIS II "le Bègue King of the West Franks.”«s87» 
Adalhard Comte de Paris (I14593)
 
161 “ADAM de Audley (-[1203/11). Adam, son of Liulf de Audley, granted Stanley, Staffordshire to William de Stanley, son of Adam de Stanley the grantor´s avunculus, in exchange for Talk o´ the Hill, undated but during the reign of King Stephen. Ancestor of the Lords Audley. m EMMA, daughter of ROBERT FitzOrm & his wife ---. Adam & his wife had two children.”«s87» DE AUDLEY, Adam (I14621)
 
162 “ADELAIDE [Adelisa] de Normandie ([1055]-7 Dec, 1066 or after). Orderic Vitalis records the betrothal of Adelaide and Harold Godwinson, listing her after Agatha and before Constance in his description of the careers of the daughters of King William. The sources are contradictory concerning the name of the daughter betrothed to Harold Godwinson, as well as the timing of her death. The only near certainty is that it would presumably have been the oldest available daughter who was betrothed to Harold. Matthew of Paris does not name her but lists her fourth among the daughters of King William, while distinguishing her from the fifth daughter betrothed to "Aldefonso Galiciæ regi". Guillaume de Jumièges records that Duke Guillaume betrothed his daughter Adelise to Harold, in a later passage (in which he does not repeat her name) stating that she was the third daughter and that she died a virgin although she was of an age to marry. Chibnall specifies that this refererence is contained in the interpolations written by Orderic Vitalis, the latter chronicler therefore contradicting his statement in his own work that Agatha was the name of the daughter who was betrothed to King Harold. Orderic Vitalis says that Adelaide "a most fair maiden vowed herself to God when she reached marriageable age and made a pious end under the protection of Roger of Beaumont". The daughter betrothed to Harold was alive in early 1066, according to Eadmer of Canterbury who says that Duke Guillaume requested King Harold, soon after his accession, to keep his promise to marry his daughter. This is contradicted by William of Malmesbury, who says that her death before that of Edward "the Confessor" was taken by KiKing Harold II as marking absolution from his oath to Duke Guillaume. She died as a nun at Préaux. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "VII Id Dec" of "Adeliza filia regis Anglorum", stating that her father made a donation fofor her soul. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Adelina filia regis Anglorum", undated but listed among deaths at the end of the calendar year. Betrothed ([1064/65]) to HAROLD Godwinson Earl of Wessex, son of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha of Denmark ([1022/25]-killed in battle Hastings 14 Oct 1066, bur [Waltham Abbey]), who succeeded in 1066 as HAROLD II King of England.”«s87» Adelaide or Adelisa (I10637)
 
163 “ADELAIS ([855/60]-18 Nov [901], bur Compiègne, église abbatiale Saint-Corneille). Regino names "Adalheidis" second wife of "Hludowicus rex filius Caroli", stating that he married her after repudiating his first wife. Her paternity is indicated by Vulfhard (who would have been the brother of Adelais) being named sororius of King Louis II. Her marriage was not recognised by the church which did not accept her husband's separation from his first wife. The Pope refused to crown Adelaiais with her husband at Troyes 878, considering that she was not his legitimate wife. Her children were considered illegitimate by the church. m ([875]) as his second wife, LOUIS King of Aquitaine, son of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d'Orléans] (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 10 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille). He succeeded his father in 875 as LOUIS II "le Bègue King of the West Franks.”«s87» Adelais (I14585)
 
164 “ADELAIS de Vermandois ([1065]-28 Sep [1120/24]). The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Odonem et Adelam sororem" as the two children of "comes Herbertus", specifying that the husband of Adela was "Hugoni le Magne" and referring to her second husband "comes de Claromonte" and specifying that her daughter by the latter married Charles Count of Flanders. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Adelidem comitissam Viromandensium, defuncto priore viro, scilicet Hugone Magno" as wife of "comes Rainaldus [de Claromonte]". She succeeded her father in [1080] as Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy. m firstly ([1080]) HUGUES de France, son of HENRI King of France & his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1057-Tarsus in Cilicia 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus church of St Paul). Comte de Vermandois et de Valois by right of his wife. Leader of the French contingent in the First Crusade Aug 1096 returning to France after the victory of Antioch 101098 to raise another army. He set out again Mar 1101 but died from wounds received fighting the Greeks at Tarsus in Cilicia. m secondly (1103) as his first wife, RENAUD de Clermont, son of HUGUES de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis] dit de Mouchy & his wife Marguerite de Roucy [Montdidier] (-before 1162). He took the title Comte after his marriage.”«s87» Adelais Countess of Vermandois (I13515)
 
165 “After he was six years of age he had no advantages for attending school in summer, and attended school in winter only about two months each year. He left home to earn his own living at an early age. At the age of nineteen he embarked on board the bark “Gold Hunter” and worked his passage around Cape Horn to the Golden State. He worked in the mines the most of the time at Columbia, Tuolumne County, until 1856, when he returned to Maine. They lived in Bangor two years and then settled in Atkinson, where they still (1887) reside. In the fall of 1861, when men were receiving no bounty and while recruiting was the most difficult, he took out recruiting papers for the 14th Reg’t Me. Vol. Infantry. Notwithstanding he had only twenty-eight days in which to raise a company, while other offices had been recruiting for nearly two months, greatly to the surprise of all he went into camp with sixty-five men that passed the mustering officer. He was commissioned as captatain of this company (E) Dec. 12, 1861. During his term of service he participated in five engagements; the first being at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 5, 1862; the last at Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863, where he received a wound supposed at the time to be mortal, and from which he has ever since been a great sufferer. When wounded he was acting as major on the regimental staff and had been for a period of more than three months. He was honorably discharged, Aug. 27, 1863. He was a brave and efficient officer, and his promotion would have been certain had not his wound compelled him to resign his positon in the army. He has an excellent farm in the town of Atkinson, where he has filled various municipal offices.”

Maine Death Record:
Orlando W. Trask
Age: Years, 58; Months, 4; Days, 18
Birth Date: abt. 1834
Place of Birth: New Sharon
Married
Occupation: Farmer
Place of Burial: Atkinson
Name of Father: Jonathan Trask
Name of Mother: Martha Jewett
Birthplace of Father: Rockwood, NH
Occupation of Father: Farmer
Death Date: 18 Mar 1892
Death Place: Atkinson
Registration Place: Atkinson, Piscataquis«s37» 
TRASK, Orlando W. (I7954)
 
166 “After teaching 2 years he grad. at Oswego Normal School in 1883. He was grad. by the Madison University, Wisconsin 1895, taking the degree of B.S. He is now principal of the High School at Berlin, Wis., where he res.

1900 Census: WI: Green Lake: Berlin: pg. 14:
Lowell, Franklin, head, born Mar 1860, age 40, married for 12 years, born in NY, father and mother born in NY, teacher;
Mary, his wife, born April 1870, age 30, married for 12 years, born in NY, father born in NY, mother born in NY.

1910 Census: WI: Oneida: Rhinelander, pg. 100:
Lowell, Franklin A., head, age 51, married for 21 years, born in NY, father and mother born in NY, owner, newspaper;
Mary M., his wife, 37, married for 21 years, has had 1 child, still living, born in WI, father born in VT, mother born in NY;
Francis, daughter, age 8, born in WI, father born in NY, mother born in WI;
plus 1 servant.

1920 Census: WI: Oneida: Rhinelander, ED$140, p. 14 of 22:
Lowell, F. A., age 61,
Mary M. age 48
Francis, age 18
[rest of record is illegible]

1930 Census: WI: Winnebago: Oshkosh
Lowell, Frank, head, rents $15, 72, wid., first married at age 21, born in NY, father and mother born in NY, no occupation;
plus 1 servant.


The Waupaca Post - June 28, 1888
A Brilliant Wedding - Tuesday occurred one of the most brilliant weddings that has taken place in Waupaca in many years. The occasion was the marriage of Miss Mary Manchester, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D. L. Manchester, of this city, to Mr.Frank Lowell, who has been principal of the Waupaca high school for the past year. The bride was born and reared in Waupaca, among the young people of which she was a great favorite. She has just graduated from the high school. The bride was attired in pink wool crape, with satin trimmings, and wore a boquet of white roses. The ceremony was performed at the residence of the bride's parents by Rev. Perry Miller, pastor of the local M. E. Church, according to the impressive ritual of that church. The wedding march was rendered by Miss Bell Smith in a highly creditable manner. The nuptial knot was tied under a horse shoe of roses, and the bride looked her prettiest on this memorable occasion. A profusion of flowers of various kinds and hues bedecked the spacious parlor and adjoining rooms. The bridal party were unattended by the usual best man and brides-maid. Only the immediate relatives and friends of the couple were present. After the ceremony a sumptuous dinner was served. A young couple left on the 4:17 P. M. train for an extended bridal tour to visit New York City, Niagra Falls, Philadelphia, Washington, Boston and the principle points of interests in the east and the former home of the groom in New York city. They will be absent about ten weeks before returning to Waupaca, which they intend making their future home. The young couple start out in life under the most favorable auspices, and with the well-wishes of their host of friends. May they live long and be happy. The presents were numerous and costly, among them being the following:
Dr. D. L.Manchester and Mr. Frank Lowell, gold watch; Mrs. D. L. Manchester, oil painting; Master John Manchester, decorated rose jar; Grandma Vaughan, $5; Mr. and Mrs. Oaks, family Bible; Mrs. Beadleston, Chicago, plush table spread, antique lace border; Adolph G. Scholl, Madison, silver napkin rings; Miss Rich, wedgewood vase; Miss Christianson and Mr. Benlick, china and silver vase; Misses Eddy and Tuttle, silver card receiver; Mr. and Mrs. Pipe, silver nut picks; Dr. and Mrs. Corbett, Weyauwega, silver nut picks; Miss Frankie White and Mr. Van Epps, small silver tea spoons; Miss Blanche Woodnorth, china tea cup and saucer; Miss Maud Pipe, silver glove buttoner; Mr. and Mrs. Joe. Woodnorth and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Whipple, large rattan rocker; Mr. P. S. Woodnorth, rocking chair; Miss Belle Woodnorth, oil painting; Mr. and Mrs. Cormican and family, silver and cut glass berry-dish; Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Stinchfield, set fruit knives; Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Stetson, dozen napkins; Misses Teely Dayton and Kittie Lytle, pair towels; Miss Libby O'Grady, handkerchief; Miss Marie Chamberlain, basket of flowers; Miss Belle Smith, volume of bound music; Mrs. R. N. Roberts, boquet of roses. 
LOWELL, Franklin Adams (I2864)
 
167 “After the fall of the royal Thuringian seat of Scithingi to the king of Metz, Theuderic I in 531, Amalaberga fled to the Ostrogothic king Theodahad, her brother, with Amalafrid and his sister Rodelindis. They were captured by the Byzantine general Belisarius and sent to Constantinople, together with the captured Ostrogothic king Witiges (or Wittigis). Justinian made Amalafrid a general and married off his sister Rodelindis to the Lombard king Auduin.”«s60» VON THÜRINGEN, Amal(a)frid of Rome, Magister Militum (I10734)
 
168 “AGATHE de Normandie (-before 1074, bur Bayeux Cathedral). Listed by Orderic Vitalis after Richard and before Adelaide in his description of the careers of the children of King William. According to William of Malmesbury, an unnamed daughter oof King William was "affianced by messengers" to King Alfonso. Orderic Vitalis names her Agatha, identifying her as the daughter who had been betrothed to Harold Godwinson (see above), and says that she was betrothed to "Amfursio regi Galliciæ". Matthew of Paris places her as the fifth daughter (unnamed) betrothed to "Aldefonso Galiciæ regi", but different from the daughter betrothed to Harold. Orderic says that she died en route to Spain, her body being brought back to Bayeux for burial. The betrothal to Alfonso must have been a short-lived arrangement as he married his first wife in 1069. Betrothed (by proxy Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity [before 1069]) to ALFONSO VI King of Galicia and Leon, son of FERNANDO I King of Castile & his wife Infanta doña Sancha de Léon (Compostela [1037]-Toledo 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo). He succeeded in 1072 as ALFONSO VI King of Castile. [Betrothed ([after 1069]) to SIMON du Vexin, son of RAOUL III “le Grand” Comte de Valois & his first wife Aélis de Bar-sur-Aube (-[30 Sep/1 Oct] 1080 Rome, bur 1082 Rome St Peter). The Vita Simonis records a ficitional speech of William I King of England in whwhich he offers his (unnamed) daughter's hand to Simon, specifying that she had previously been betrothed to "regis Hispaniarum Anfursi et Roberti principis Apuliæ". The supposed betrothal to Robert of Apulia (which would have to refer to Roberert "Guiscard" Duke of Apulia) is unrecorded in the numerous other sources dealing with his life and is probably pure fantasy. This does not instil confidence with respect to the historical accuracy of the whole passage, but if it is correct the daughter in question would presumably have been Agatha who was probably the daughter of King William betrothed to "Amfursio regi Galliciæ" (see above). Count Simon resigned his county in 1077, became a monk and went on pilgrimage to Rome where he died.]”«s87» Agathe (I10639)
 
169 “AGNES de Mâcon ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido". Her birth date range is estimated on the basis of the estimated birth date range of her mother. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020]. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "104043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ". Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis". Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…". A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her steppson Duke Eudes and installing her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this timeme. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius". "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses". A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", wwho retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" whho restored it to the abbey. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa". m firstly (1019) as his third wife, GUILLAUME III "le Grand" Comte de Poitou, GUILLAUME V Duke of Aquitaine, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Abbaye de Maillezais 31 Jan 1030). m secondly (1 Jan 1032, divorced [1049/52]) as his first wife, GEOFFROY d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES III "Nerra" Comte d'Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde [de Metz] (14 Oct 1006-9 Sep 1067). He succeeded his father in 1040 as GEOFFROY II "Martel" Comte d'Anjou.”«s87» Agnes de Mâcon (I13223)
 
170 “AIMERY [II] (-after 19 Jan 973). "Aimerici vicecomitis, Savarici fratris sui" subscribed the donation by "Frotbaudus sacerdos" of property "in pago Pictavo in vicaria Toarcinse in villa…Orioni" to St Cyprien by charter dated [955/56]. Vicomtte de Thouars. "Aimerici vicecomitis, Savarici vicecomitis" subscribed a charter dated [975/1000] under which "Berengerius…ex parte Rorgonis consanguinei sui" donated property to St Cyprien. m [firstly] ALIENOR [Hardouine], daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 955. [m secondly HILDEGARDE, daughter of ---. "Lotharius rex Francorum" issued a charter dated 19 Jan 973 which names "Aymericus Thoarcensis vicecomitis et uxori suæ Hildegardi".] Aimery [II] & his [first/second] wife had three children:
(a) ARBERT [I] (-before Jan 987). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars.
(b) SAVARY (-[994/95] or after). 963/[975/93]. "Savarici avunculi eius…" subscribed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur.
(c) [GUIONNE (-29 Mar 991, bur Madeleine de la Fougereuse). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m JEAN [II] de la Sauzay (-bur Madeleine de la Fougereuse).”«s87» 
Aimery II Vicomte de Thouars (I14734)
 
171 “AIMERY [IV] de Thouars, son of GEOFFROY [II] Vicomte de Thouars & his wife Eléonore --- (-murdered 1093, bur Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Chaise). Vicomte de Thouars. "…Aymerici vicecomitis de Tuarz…" subscribed the charter dated [1047] under which "Guilelmus…princeps Arvernorum" donated property to the abbey of Charroux. "Vicecomes Aimericus filius Gaufredi et nepos Radulfi vicecomitis" donated property "Flauziacus" to St Cyprien by charter dated [1055/73] subscribed by "uxor sua Aremgardis". The Chronicon sancti Florentii Salmurensis records the death in 1093 of "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensis" and his donation of "Casam".
m firstly AREMGARDE, sister of Raoul and Geoffroy de Mauléon, daughter of --- (-after 1069). A charter dated 1069 relates to the foundation of Chaise-le-Vicomte by "Aimericus Toarcensium vicecomes" and names "uxor ipius vicecomitis Orengardis". The primary source which confirms her origin has not yet been identified.
m secondly MARIE, daughter of ---. 1080. An undated charter of "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcii" refers to "hoc donum quod uxor mee Maria fecit libenter dedit" referring to a donation to the abbey of l'Absie.
m thirdly AMELINE, daughter of ---. 1088/93. An undated charter recalls the foundation of Chaise-le-Vicomte by "Aimericus vicecomes" and names "uxoris eius Amelinæ", subscribed by "Gofredus vicecomes".
Aimery [IV] & his first wife had seven children:
1. AIMERY . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. before 1090.
2. RAOUL [II] . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. [1094]. Vicomte de Thouars. m --- de Mareuil, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
3. ARBERT [II] (-killed in battle Jaffa 28 May 1102). "Aimerico vicecomite de Toarcio filiique eius Arberto" witnessed a charter dated [1082] under which "Erchembaldus Grenulla" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély. Vicomte de Thouars. AAn extract of the history of the foundation of Chaise-le-Vicomte records that in 1101 "Herbertus Toarcensium vicecomes et frater eius Gauffridus cum Guillelmo comite Pictavorum" journeyed to Jerusalem. m firstly (before 1095) AGNES, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. m secondly HILDIARDE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. [1123].
a) AIMERY [V] (-1139, bur Saint-Jouin-de-Marne). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars. m MARIE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
b) [ARBERT . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1092/1115.]
4. GEOFFROY [III] (1040-1123 or after). A charter of Chaise-le-Vicomte names "Aimerico vicecomite" and "Gauzfridi vicecomitis filii supradicti Aimerici" dated 28 Aug 1104 "post combustionem castri Toarcii patratam a Gauzfrido Martello adhuc iuvene, Andegavorum comite". Vicomte de Thouars.
5. GEOFFROY [IV] de Tiffauges . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars 1131.
6. HILDEGARDE [Aldearde] (-after 7 Dec 1099). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m (before 1060) HUGUES [VI] "le Diable" de Lusignan, son of HUGUES V "le Pieux" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Almodis de la Marche (-in France [1106/10]). He succeeded his father in 1060 as Sire de Lusignan et de Couhé.
7. ALIENOR . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. "Bossonis vicecomitis, Aimerici filius eius, Adenordis vicecomitissæ" witnessed a charter dated [1082] under which "Erchembaldus Grenulla" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Boso vicecomes et uxor eius Adenors et filii eorum" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated 1088 subscribed by "Bosonis vicecomitis et Aenoris uxoris eius et filiorum ipsorum Aimerici et Bosonis et sororis eorum Gisberge". "Willelmus Goscelinus monachus Sancti Cipriani" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated [1088] subscribed by "Boso vicecomes, Ainors uxor, filii ipsorum Aimericus, Boso et Petrus". "Castri Araldus vicecomes…Boso…cum uxore Adenorde et filio Aimerico" donated property "allodium…in Brigisensi pago apud villam Culturas" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur by undated charter subscribed by "filii eius minoris Bosonis". m ([1075]) BOSON [II] Vicomte de Châtellerault, son of HUGUES [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Gerberge de La Rochefoucauld (-1095 or after).”«s87» 
Aimery IV Vicomte de Thouars (I14708)
 
172 “AIMON [I] de Genève, son of GERAUD Comte de Genève & his [second] wife Tetberga --- (-12 May before 1128). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Genève. Vassal of the bishop of Geneva. Avoué of St Victor, Geneva. Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1089 under which "Aimon comte des Equestres et de Genevois et Girold son fils" founded the priory of Chamonix. The necrology of Saint-Claude records the death "IV Id Mai" of "Aymo comes Gebennensis".
m ITA, daughter of --- (-before 1091). The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
Aimon [I] & his wife had [four] children:
1. [CONON (-1107 or after). Bishop of Maurienne 1088/1107. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the possible son of Comte Aimon [I]. However, the chronology appears too broad for him to have been the brother of Comte Amédée [I].]
2. GERAUD . Rivaz, in his compiled index of Burgundian charters. notes a charter dated 1089 under which "Aimon comte des Equestres et de Genevois et Girold son fils" founded the priory of Chamonix. 1091.
3. AMEDEE [I] (-26 Jun 1178).
4. GUILLAUME (-before 1153). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.”«s87» 
Aimon I Comte de Genève (I15675)
 
173 “AIMON de Faucigny, son of RODOLPHE Sire de Faucigny & his wife --- (-[1179/92] or after). Sire de Faucigny. "Aymon dominus Foucigniaci" granted property "in territorio S. Pauli. Gebenn. dyocesis…inter Dranciam et Brest" to "nobilis vir Aymon dominus de Blonay, consanguineus noster" by charter dated Apr 1146. He founded the Chartreuse abbey of Reposoir in 1151.
m ---. The name of Aimon's wife is not known.
Aimon & his wife had seven children:
1. RODOLPHE (-before 1178). "Henricus de Fulciniaco" confirmed donations to la Chartreuse du Reposoir by "Aimo pater meus…et frater meus Rodolphus", with the support of "fratre meo Wuillermo" by charter dated 21 Oct 1185.
2. HENRI (-14 Nov 1197). Provost at Geneva cathedral 1168. Sire de Faucigny 1178. "Henricus de Fulciniaco" confirmed donations to la Chartreuse du Reposoir by "Aimo pater meus…et frater meus Rodolphus", with the support of "fratre meo Wuillermo" by charter dated 21 Oct 1185. m COMTESSON de Genève, daughter of AMEDEE [I] Comte de Genève & his second wife --- [de Domène] (-before 1188). Dame de Clermont. Henri & his wife had three children:
a) GUILLAUME (-[19 Sep/Oct] 1202). Sire de Faucigny. "Aimo de Fulciniaco", with the advice of "tutoris mei Nantelmi de Miolans", confirmed prior donations to la Chartreuse du Reposoir by "frater meus Vuillermus", by charter dated Feb 1210.
b) AIMON [II] (-[Apr/Oct] 1253). Sire de Faucigny. "Aimo de Fulciniaco" confirmed the properties of la Chartreuse du Reposoir by charter dated 9 Oct 1202. "Aimo de Fulciniaco", with the advice of "tutoris mei Nantelmi de Miolans", confirmed prior donations to la Chartreuse du Reposoir by "frater meus Vuillermus", by charter dated Feb 1210. "Haimonem dominum de Fucignie" reached an agreement with the bishop of Lausanne concerning the advocacy of the church of Lausanne, which Aimon claimed had been granted by "comitibus de Ciburc", by charter dated 1226. An undated charter confirmed the agreement ending the war between the bishop of Lausanne and "Aymo dominus de Fucigniaco", sworn by "viros nobiles dominum Petrum de Sabauddia et R comitem Gebennensem". m firstly (1210, separated) BEATRIX d'Auxonne, daughter of ETIENNE [III] Comte d'Auxonne [Bourgogne-Comté] & his first wife Beatrix de Chalon (-20 Mar 1261). The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. She married secondly (before 1224) as his second wife, Simon Sire de Joinville (-May 1233). m secondly (before 9 Oct 1231) as her second husband, FLOTTE de Royans, widow of GUILLAUME [II] de Poitiers Comte de Valentinois, daughter of RAIMBAUD BERENGER de Royans "Ossassica" & his wife Alix de la Tour du Pin. 1227/1257. Aimon [II] & his first wife had two children:
i) BEATRIX (-after 8 Mar 1276). "Aymone Signore di Faussigni" declared "Agnese sua figlia Moglie del Conte Pietro fu Tommaso di Savoia" his heir in default of male children, reserving the dowry of "Beatrice altra sua figlia" by charter dated Feb 1233. The testament of "Agnese Dama di Faussigny" dated 9 Aug 1268 makes bequests "a Beatrice Dama di Thoyre, e di Villars sua Sorella, ed a suoi figliuoli…a Simone di Jonville Signore di Gex suo fratello". m ETIENNE [II] Sire de Thoire et Villars (-1250).
ii) AGNES (-11 Aug 1268, bur Faucigny, Abbaye de Contamine). The testament of "Pietro figlio del Conte Tommaso de Savoia" dated Feb 1233 appoints the children to be born from his marriage to "Agnese figlia di Aimone Signore di Faussigni" as his heirs. "Aymone Signore di Faussigni" declared "Agnese sua figlia Moglie del Conte Pietro fu Tommaso di Savoia" his heir in default of male children, reserving the dowry of "Beatrice altra sua figlia" by charter dated Feb 1233. Dame de Faucigny. The testament of "Agnese Signora di Faussign" dated 17 Oct 1262 appoints "Pietro di Savoia di Lei Marito…e Beatrice sua figlia Moglie di Gio Delfino di Vienna" as her heirs. The testament of "Agnese Dama di Faussign Moglie di Pietro di Savoia" dated 16 Nov 1262 appoints "Beatrice sua figlia" as her heir in one third of her property and her husband as heir in the other two thirds, as well as choosing to be buried "nella Chiesa di Contamine". The testament of "Agnese Dama di Faussigny" dated 9 Aug 1268 appoints "Beatrice Contessa di Vienna ed Albonne sua figlia" as her heirs, chooses to be buried "nella Chiesa di Contamine", and makes bequests "a Beatrice Dama di Thoyre, e di Villars sua Sorella, ed a suoi figliuoli…a Simone di Jonville Signore di Gex suo fratello". m (betrothed Feb 1234, after 25 Jun 1236) PIERRE de Savoie, son of THOMAS I Comte de Savoie & his wife Béatrix [Marguerite] de Genève (castle of Susa 1203-Pierre Châtel [14] May 1268, bur 16 May 1268 Abbaye de Hautecombe). He succeeded his nephew in 1263 as PIERRE II "le Petit-Charlemagne" Comte de Savoie.
Aimon [II] had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
iii) AIMON de Faucigny. 1262/1268.
c) [BEATRIX] .
3. GUILLAUME . "Henricus de Fulciniaco" confirmed donations to la Chartreuse du Reposoir by "Aimo pater meus…et frater meus Rodolphus", with the support of "fratre meo Wuillermo" by charter dated 21 Oct 1185. 1178.
4. AIMON . 1178.
5. MARCHAND . 1178.
6. BEATRIX . 1174/1179. m as his second wife, GUILLAUME de Genève, son of AMEDEE [I] Comte de Genève & his first wife Mathilde de Cuiseaux ([1131/37]-25 Jul 1196). He succeeded his father in 1178 as Comte de Genève.
7.ALEYDE . Nun.”«s87» 
Aimon I Sire de Faucigny (I15643)
 
174 “ALBERT de Namur (-[1063/64]). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Ermengardis" was mother of "Albertum comitem de Namuco"[44]. He succeeded his brother as ALBERT II Comte de Namur. He founded Saint-Aubain at Namur, as shown by the Fundatio Ecclesiæ S Albani Namucensis which records "comes Albertus secundus, ortus ex patre Lothariensi, matre vero Francigena Ermengarde, nobilissimam Francorum regum prosapiam trahente" as founder of the church. m REGELINDIS of Lower Lotharingia, daughter of GOZELON I Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his wife ---. The Fundatio ecclesiæ Sancti Albani Namurcensis refers to the wife of "comes Albertus secundus" as "Gothelonis ducis filia" but does not name her. The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Gosseclone ducis Lotharingie…[filia] Raelendem" as wife of "Alberto comiti". The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Godefridum ducem, Odam et Regelindam" as children of "Gozelo, frater Arnulphi et Godefridi". Her birth date range is estimated from her eldest son being born before 1035. She was given Durbuy as her dowry by her father. Comte Albert II & his wife had two children:
a) ALBERT de Namur (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio". He succeeded his father as ALBERT III Comte de Namur.
b) HENRI [I] de Namur (-after 23 Apr 1088). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio". The Chronicon Huberti names "Albertus comes Namucensis et Henricus Durboiensis", but does not specify the relationship between them. Comte de Durbuy. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed donations to St Jakob, Liège by charter dated 23 Apr 1088, at the request of "Heinrico comite de Durbui".”«s87» 
Albert II Comte de Namur (I15972)
 
175 “ALBERT de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio". He succeeded his father in [1063/64] as ALBERT III Comte de Namur. He claimed to succeed to the inheritance of his first cousin Godefroi III "Le Bossu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1076, challenging the succession of Godefroi de Bouillon [Boulogne] and at one point unsuccessfully besieging the castle of Bouillon. As guardian of her interests in Lotharingia, Matilda of Tuscany granted Albert the county of Verdun which Theoderic Bishop of Verdun had bebestowed on her in 1076, in order to thwart Godefroi de Bouillon´s inheritance. In addition, Emperor Heinrich IV appointed Albert as vice-duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1076 to rule for his infant son Konrad, whom he had installed as Duke of Loweer Lotharingia. "Heinricus…tertius Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of St Jakob, Liège by "Albertus comes Nammucensium filiis [suis] Godefrido, Heinrico, Alberto" by charter dated 1 Jun 1101. The Notæ Bronienses record the death in 1102 of "Albertus comes Namucensis".
m ([1065/66]) as her second husband IDA of Saxony, widow of FREDERIC II Duke of Lower Lotharingia [Luxembourg], daughter of BERNHARD II Duke in Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). "Ida" is named as wiffe of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given. The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchioniis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum". On her marriage, she brought her husband extensive lands north-east of the castle of Bouillon which later formed the county of Laroche. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, her husband's claim to Bouillon was through the property brought by his wife.
Comte Albert III & his wife had five children:
1. GODEFROI de Namur (-19 Aug 1139). The Chronicon Huberti names "Godefrido filio Alberti comitis Namucensis". He succeeded his father in 1102 as GODEFROI Comte de Namur.
2. HENRI de Namur (-before 1138). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium names "Godefridum et Henricum comitem de Rupe" as sons of "Albertus de Namurco". Comte de Laroche.
3. FREDERIC de Namur (-22 May 1121). The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Frederici [episcopus]…frater eius Namucensis comes Godefridus". The Vita Friderici names "sancti Frederici episcopi" as son of "patre Alberto [Namucensis castelli comeses], matre Ida", specifying that he was third son. Orderic Vitalis records the installation of "Frederick brother of Herman count of Namur" as Bishop of Liège in Oct 1119 by Pope Calixtus II and his death less than three years later, poisoned by his rivals. Bishop of Liège 1119. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the death "1121 VI Kal Iunii" of "episcopus Fredericus".
4. ALBERT de Namur (-shortly before 1122). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names (in order) "Fridericum episcopum, Godefridum, Henricum et Albertum fratres" as sons of "Albertum comitem". The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Godefridum comitem de Namuco et comitem Albertum de Rupe et sorores eorum" as children of "Albertus comes senior Namucensis", although it appears probable that Alberic intended to refer to "Heinricum de Rupe" instead of "Albertum" given that on a subsequent page he lists the children of "Henricum" as children of "Albertum". William of Tyre records the marriage of "fratri comitis Namura" and his installation to succeed his wife's first husband as Lord of Jaffa. m ([1118/19]) as her second husband, MABILE de Roucy, widow of HUGUES de Puiset Lord of Jaffa, daughter of EBLES de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Sibylle de Apulia.
5. ALIX de Namur . The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alaide sorore comitis Godefridi Namucensis" as wife of "comes Otto de Cisneio". 1097/1124. m as his second wife, OTTO [II] Comte de Chiny, son of ARNOUL Comte de Chiny & his first wife Adela de Roucy (-1131 or after).”«s87» 
Albert III Comte de Namur (I15500)
 
176 “ALBERT, son of ROBERT [I] Comte de Namur & his wife --- (-shortly before 1011). Albert, Gislebert and Ratbod are named as sons of Comte Robert in a charter dated 981[30]. He succeeded as ALBERT I Comte de Namur. "Otto…rex" confirmed the privileges of Brogne abbey "in pago Lomacensis situm" by charter dated 992 which names "comiti…Namuci Adelberto"[31]. His date of death is suggested by a record, dated to 1011, of a monk from St Vaast d'Arras dreaming of hell where he recognised "Albertum Namucensium comitatui" being tortured, the episode being incorporated into a circular letter from Richard Bishop of Verdun to all abbeys[32].
m (990) ERMENGARDE, daughter of CHARLES Duke of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian] & wife Adelais de Troyes ([970/75]-after 1013). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Karolus dux" was father of "Ermengardem et Gerbergam"[33]. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium, on the other hand, names "Hermegardam Namursi cometissam" as only daughter of "Ottoni duci Lotharingiæ", son of Duke Charles[34]. This appears chronologically difficult to sustain, assuming that Ermengarde was the mother of Albert's children as shown below. It would also mean that her daughter Liutgarde could not have been the mother of Baldric [II] Bishop of Liège (see below), already tight chronologically if Ermengarde married in 990. The Fundatio Ecclesiæ S Albani Namucensis is less specific on Ermengarde's origin when it names her son "comes Albertus secundus, ortus ex patre Lothariensi" and refers to his mother as "matre vero Francigena Ermengarde, nobilissimam Francorum regum prosapiam trahhente"[35]. The date of her marriage is suggested by the fact that Richer does not name her among the children who were imprisoned with her father in 991: "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerbergaa, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote"[36]. This presumably indicates that her marriage predated this imprisonment. It has been suggested that Ermengarde was Albert [I]'s second wife, considering the likely difference in their ages[37]. If this is correct, it is unlikely that there were any surviving children from his earlier marriage as Albert's successor (presumably his eldest surviving son) was the son of his surviving wife, presumably Ermengarde, as shown by the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium which records that "Rotberdo Namurcensi comite" betrayed Lambert Comte de Louvain after the battle of Hougaerde (dated to 1013) and that Lambert, captured by "Herimannum…comitem", was released after the intervention of "Rotbodi…comitis mater"[38].
Comte Robert I & his wife had [six] children:
1. ROBERT de Namur (-before 1031). The Fundatio Ecclesiæ S Albani Namucensis names "comes Albertus secundus, ortus ex patre Lothariensi, matre vero Francigena Ermengarde, nobilissimam Francorum regum prosapiam trahente"[39], which iis assumed to indicate that Comte Albert and Ermengardis were the parents of Robert. He succeeded as ROBERT II Comte de Namur. The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium records that "Rotberdo Namurcensi comite" betrayed Lambert Comte de Louvain after the battle of Hougaerde (dated to 1013), that Lambert was captured by "Herimannum…comitem" but released after the intervention of "Rotbodi…comitis mater"[40]. The Miracula Sancti Veroni names "comitem Ratbodum" when recording that he recovereed from fever after being taken to the relics of St Veronus[41]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" brought under his protection the abbey of Saint-Jean de Florennes "in pago et in comitatu Lommensi sitam, cuius nunc comes adest Ratbodus", founded by Gerard Bishop of Cambrai, by charter dated 1018[42]. m ---. No reference has been found to the wife of Comte Robert II. Comte Robert II & his wife had one child:
a) son . The Miracula Sancti Gengulfi name "Radbodus Namurcensium comes" and record that "filio suo morte gravatu" was cured by St Gengulf[43]. No other reference has been found to this child, who presumably died young.
2. ALBERT de Namur (-[1063/64]). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Ermengardis" was mother of "Albertum comitem de Namuco"[44]. He succeeded his brother as ALBERT II Comte de Namur. He founded Saint-Aubain at Namur, as shown by the Fundatio Ecclesiæ S Albani Namucensis which records "comes Albertus secundus, ortus ex patre Lothariensi, matre vero Francigena Ermengarde, nobilissimam Francorum regum prosapiam trahente" as founder of the church[45]. m REGEGELINDIS of Lower Lotharingia, daughter of GOZELON I Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his wife ---. The Fundatio ecclesiæ Sancti Albani Namurcensis refers to the wife of "comes Albertus secundus" as "Gothelonis ducis filia" but does not name her[46]]. The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Gosseclone ducis Lotharingie…[filia] Raelendem" as wife of "Alberto comiti"[47]. The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Godefridum ducem, Odam et Regelindam" as children of "Gozelo, frater Arnulphi et Godefridi"[48]. Her birth date range is estimated from her eldest son being born before 1035. She was given Durbuy as her dowry by her father. Comte Albert II & his wife had two children:
a) ALBERT de Namur (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio"[49]. He succeeded his father as ALBERT III Comte de Namur.
- see below.
b) HENRI [I] de Namur (-after 23 Apr 1088). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Albertum comitem de Namuco" was father of "Albertum et fratrem eius Heinricum comitem de Durboio"[50]. The Chronicon Huberti names "Albertus comes Namucensis et Henricus Durboiensis", but does not specify the relationship between them[51]. Comte de Durbuy. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed donations to St Jakob, Liège by charter dated 23 Apr 1088, at the request of "Heinrico comite de Durbui"[52].
- COMTES de DURBUY.
3. HEDWIG [Hadewide] de Namur ([1005/10]-28 Jan [1080]). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Hadewidem et Emmam de Los" as the two daughters of "Ermengardis [filiæ Karoli ducis]" and as mother of "Theodericum ducem et Gerardum comitem fratres"[53]. It is likely that Hedwig was born during that latter part of the married life of her parents, given her own death in [1080] and her father's death before 1010. The Liber Memoriales of Remiremont records the donation of "Haduydis ducissa…consentientibus filiis suis duce Teoderico atque comite Girardo"[54]. "Hadewidis ductrix" founded the abbey of Châtenois by charter dated to after 1075, confirmed "post obitum ductricis Hadewidis" by "dux Theodericus filius eius"[55]. m GERARD Duke of Upper Lotharingia, son of GERHARD Graf & his wife Gisela --- (-Remiremont [14 Apr 1070]).
4. [LIUTGARDE [Emma] de Namur . The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis"[56]. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Lutgarde filia Hermegardis Namurcensis comitissæ, Ottonis prefati ducis filie" as wife of "Ottonis comitis de Los", parents of Baldric [II] Bishop of Liège[57]. The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Hadewidem et Emmam de Los" as the two daughters of "Ermengardis [filiæ Karoli ducisucis]"[58]. From a chronological point of view, an additional generation in the family of the Comtes de Looz, between Rudolf (967) and Gislebert ([1044/46]), would not be surprising. Nevertheless the chronology is tight for a daughter of Albert I Comte de Namur and his wife Ermengardis (married in 990) to have been the mother of Baldric Bishop of Liège (installed as bishop in 1008), unless the latter's installation was in his adolescence (not impossible but requiring Papal dispensation, of which no record has been found). m OTTO Comte de Looz, son of [RUDOLF & his wife ---.]
5. GODA de Namur . The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis", specifying that Goda was mother of "Meinsindam matrem sancti Arnulfi episcopi Suessioniæ"[59], although this may not be a reliable source as it is inaccurate in recording the descendants of Goda's supposed sister Liutgarde. [m ---. No indication has been found about the identity of Goda´s husband.] Goda & her husband had one child:
a) [MEINSINDA . The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis", specifying that Goda was mother of "Meinsindam matrem sancti Arnulfi episcopi Suessioniæ"[60], although this may not be a reliable source as it is inaccurate in recording the descendants of Goda's supposed sister Liutgarde. m ---. No indication has been found about the identity of Meinsinda´s husband.] Meinsinda & her husband had [one child]:
i) [ARNOUL (-Oudenbourg, Bruges 1087). The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis", specifying that Goda was mother of "Meinsindam matrem sancti Arnulfi episcopi Suessssioniæ"[61], although this may not be a reliable source as it is inaccurate in recording the descendants of Goda's supposed sister Liutgarde. He entered the Benedictine monastery of Saint Médard at Soisson in 1060. Bishop of Soissons 1081. He resigned from the see, and retired to the monastery of Oudenbourg which he had founded.]
6. ERMENGARDE de Namur . The Vita Arnulfi names "Lugerdam, Godam, Ermengardam" as the three sisters of "Albertus comes Namurcensis"[62].«s87» 
Albert I Comte de Namur (I15975)
 
177 “ALFONSO "Betote", son of ---. Conde, maybe conde de Tuy and conde de Deza. He carried out the repopulation of Minho inferior during the reign of Alfonso III King of León.
m ---. The name of Alfonso's wife is not known.
Alfonso & his wife had six children”
1. GONZALO Betótiz (-929). Conde. m TERESA Eriz, daughter of ERO Fernández & his [first/second] wife [Adosinda ---/Elvira ---].
2. TETÓN Betótiz . All the information about Tetón Betótiz, his descendants and younger siblings, is set out in Mattoso. m ---. The name of Tetón's wife is not known. Tetón & his wife had three children:
a) PELAYO Tetóniz (-after 951). “…Pelagius Teoderici comes et dux…” confirmed the charter dated 26 Sep 942 under which Bishop Rosendo donated property to Celanova. m his first cousin, IBERIA González, daughter of GONZALO Betótiz & his wife Teresa Eriz (-after 929). Pelayo & his wife had two children:
i) CHAMOA Peláez (-after 968).
ii) VELAZQUITA Peláez (-after 968).
b) RODRIGO Tetóniz (-after [939]). Maybe m LEODEGUNDIA Díaz, daughter of DIEGO Fernández & his wife Onega [Jiménez] (-before 960). Rodrigo & his wife had three children:
i) CHAMOA Rodríguez (-after 960).
ii) RAMIRO (-after 960).
iii) DIEGO Rodríguez (-after 960).
c) OLIDE Tetóniz (-after 946). m ADOSINDA Gormiri, daughter of --- (-after 946). Her husband offered her arras in 946.”
3. TELLO Betótiz . m ---. The name of Tello's wife is not known. Tello & his wife had one child:
a) DIEGO Téllez .
4. TEODO Betótiz .
5. ARAGUNTE Betótiz .
6. --- Betótiz . m ---. One child:
a) VERMUDO Pépez . According to Mattoso, this person was either the son or grandson of one of the children of Alfonso "Betote"[17]. m GUNTRODA, daughter of ---. Vermudo & his wife had one child:
i) PELAYO Vermúdez . m ---. The name of Pelayo's wife is not known. Pelayo & his wife had two children:
(a) BALTEIRO Peláyez (-after 985).
(b) GODO Peláyez . m ---. The name of Godo's wife is not known. Godo & his wife had one possible child:
(1) [PELAYO Gódez]. m ---. The name of Pelayo's wife is not known. Pelayo & his wife had one child:
a. GOINA Peláyez . m SOEIRO Galindes, Senhor de Riba Cávado. According to Fernandes[18], he was the father of Nuno Soares "Velho" who was the ancestor of the Velho family.«s87» 
Alfonso “Betote” (I15016)
 
178 “ALFONSO de León, son of VERMUDO II "el Gotoso" King of León & his second wife Elvira García de Castilla (996-killed in battle Viseu 7 Aug 1028, bur León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Alfonso and Teresa" as the children of King Vermrmudo and his wife Elvira. He was "three years of age" when his father died, according to the Historia Silense, five years old according to the Chronicon Regum Legionensium. The Cronica de Sampiro records that "Adefonsus filius eius…annos tres" succeeded on the death of King Vermudo II. He succeeded his father in 999 as ALFONSO V King of León, under the regency of Menendo González although this was opposed by Sancho García Conde de Castilla. After the death of al-Mansur, the kingdom of León signed a peace treaty with his son al-Muzzaffar, subsequently providing help to the Muslim troops which sacked Catalonia in 1003. Sancho III King of Navarre captured large parts of the kingdom of León. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium records that King Alfonso reigned for 26 years and was killed "by an arrow at the town of Viseu in Portugal", and buried in León "with his wife Elvira". The Chronicon Compostellani records that “Adefonsus filius eius [Veremudi, Ordonii filius]” reigned 29 years.
m firstly (1015) ELVIRA Menéndez, daughter of conde MENENDO González & his wife Tota Domna (-2 Dec 1022, bur León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Elvira" daughter of "count Menendo González and his wife countess Mayor" as the wife of King Alfonso. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium records that King Alfonso was buried in León "with his wife Elvira".
m secondly (1023) URRACA García de Navarra, daughter of GARCÍA IV “el Tremulo” King of Navarre & his wife Jimena Fernández de Cea (-after 6 Aug 1031). “Rex Adefonsi proles Veremudi cum coniuge mea Regina Urraca” donated property to the church of Santiago by charter “IV Kal Nov” dated to 1024. Her parentage is suggested by the document of her stepson King Vermudo III dated 6 Aug 1031 in which he names her "tia mea Urraca regina Garseani regis filia".
King Alfonso V & his first wife had two children:
1. SANCHA de León (1013-7 Nov 1067). The Historia Silense records the marriage of "Fernandus" to "Sanciam filiam Adefonsi Galiciensis regis". The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Vermudo and Sancha" as the children of King Alfonso and his wife Elvira, specifying that Sancha married "King Fernando, the son of King Sancho the Fat". The Annales Complutense record the death in 1067 of “Regina Sancia”. Betrothed ([Jan/May] 1029) to GARCÍA II Sánchez Conde de Castilla, son of SANCHO García Conde de Castilla & his wife Urraca Salvadórez ([Nov] 1009-murdered León 13 May 1029, bur San Salvador de Oña). m ([Nov/Dec] 1032) FERNANDO de Navarra Conde de Castilla, son of SANCHO III King of Navarre, Conde de Aragón, Conde de Castilla & his wife Munia Mayor Ctss de Castilla ([1016/18]-27 Dec 1065, bur León). Under the division of territories organised by his father, he received Castile, succeeding in 1035 as FERNANDO I "el Magno" King of Castile. He proclaimed himself FERNANDO I King of León after defeating his brother-in-law Vermudo III King of León at Tamarón 4 Sep 1037.
2. VERMUDO de León ([1017/18]-killed in battle Tamarón 4 Sep 1037, bur San Isidoro de León). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Vermudo and Sancha" as the children of King Alfonso and his wife Elvira. King Vermudo declared himself 18 yearrs old in a 20 Jan 1036 donation to the monastery of Sahagún. He succeeded his father in 1028 as VERMUDO III King of León. “Veremudus princeps, proles Adefonsi…cum coniuge mea Urraca Regina” donated property to the church of Santiago by charteter “III Kal Jan” dated to 1028, witnessed by “Veremudus Rex, Urraca Regina, Sancia proles Regis, Tarasia, Sancia…”. “Veremudus Rex proles Adefonsi Principis et Gelviræ reginæ” donated property to the church of Santiago by charter “VIII Kal Sep” dated to 1032, witnessed by “Urraca Regina, Gelvira, Sancia, Tarasia, Sancia, Hordonius, Veremudus, Froila Menendiz, Vermudus, Ovecus”. Sancho III "el Mayor" King of Navarre captured the land between the Cea and Pisuerga rivers, forced the marriage of Vermudo III's sister to his son Fernando, and captured the city of León in 1034. King Vermudo retreated into Galicia where he styled himself "Emperor" on his coinage. King Vermudo returned to León after the death of King Sancho III in Oct 1035, and campaigned to recover his lost territories. The Annales Complutense record the death in 1037 of “Veremundus Rex filius Aldefonsi et germanus Sanciæ Reginæ”, although many of the dates in this source are inaccurate. He was killeed in battle by his brother-in-law Fernando I King of Castile, who succeeded him as King of León. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium records that King Vermudo was killed in battle by his brother-in-law King Fernando "in the Tamarón valley" and was buried in León "in the era 1060 (1022)" (incorrect date) after a reign of ten years. The Chronicon Compostellani records that “Veremudus filius eius [Adefonsi]” reigned nine years. [m firstly (before 30 Dec 1028) URRACA, daughter of ---. “VVeremudus princeps, proles Adefonsi…cum coniuge mea Urraca Regina” donated property to the church of Santiago by charter “III Kal Jan” dated to 1028, witnessed by “Veremudus Rex, Urraca Regina, Sancia proles Regis, Tarasia, Sancia…”. This is thhe only evidence so far found of this possible first marriage. It is possible that the charter should refer to Vermudo´s stepmother Urraca, not his supposed wife.] [m secondly (before 25 Aug 1032) ELVIRA, daughter of ---. “Veremudus Rex proleles Adefonsi Principis et Gelviræ reginæ” donated property to the church of Santiago by charter “VIII Kal Sep” dated to 1032, witnessed by “Urraca Regina, Gelvira, Sancia, Tarasia, Sancia, Hordonius, Veremudus, Froila Menendiz, Vermudus, Ovecus”. This is the only evidence so far found of this possible second marriage.] m [thirdly] ([23 Jan 1034/17 Feb 1035]) JIMENA Sánchez [de Navarra, daughter of SANCHO III King of Navarre, Conde de Aragón, Conde de Castilla & his wife Munia Mayor CCtss de Castilla] (-after 23 Dec 1062, bur San Isidoro de León). Although she is described in the epitaph on her tomb as "domna Xemena uxor regis Veremundi iunioris … Sanctiique Kastellani comitis filia", Salazar y Acha argues convincingly her Navarrese origin. The other evidence includes her confirmation of a donation by Fernando I King of Castile dated 21 Dec 1062 in which she is named "Xemena devota regina soror illius", as well as a similar donation dated 23 Dec 1062. In any case, by the time of her marriage in [1034/35], her presumed father King Sancho of Navarre was also Conde de Castilla (in the name of his wife) so could correctly have been described as "Sanctiique Kastellani comitis" depending on the point of viiew of the author of the inscription. She is incorrectly named Teresa by 13th century chroniclers. She presumably married after 23 Jan 1034, the last date when King Vermudo is named alone in charter documentation. She made joint donations witth her husband dated 17 Feb 1035, 20 Jan 1036 and 9 Jun 1037. She became a nun at Vega after the death of her husband. She is named 'Regina Xemena tenente del monasterio de Veiga' in a document dated (presumably wrongly) 1034. King Vermudo III & his [first/second] wife had one child:
a) ALFONSO (b and d 1030). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
King Alfonso V & his second wife had one child:
3. JIMENA de León . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m conde FERNANDO Gundemariz, son of ---. Fernando & his wife had [two] children:
a) [CRISTINA Fernández . Menéndez Pidal hypothesises about this affiliation of the wife of don Diego Fernández (and mother of Jimena Díaz, who married Rodrigo Díaz "el Cid"). It is consistent with her daughter Jimena Díaz being described as "neptem suam" by Alfonso VI King of Castile. m as his second wife, conde DIEGO Fernández, son of don FERNANDO Flaínez & his wife Elvira Peláez (-before 1046).]
b) [URRACA Fernández . She refers to her father in her confirmation of the 1083 document of Rodrigo Díaz, in which she is described as "amitae suæ" of the latter, relating to his and his siblings' claim to the monastery of Tol. The reconstruction shown here is consistent with the translation of this term as "mother's sister", instead of the more usual "father's sister".]
King Alfonso V had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
4. NUÑO Alfonso de Amaya. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. m GONTRODA Gutiérrez, daughter of GUTIERRE de Castro & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Nuño & his wife had one child:
a) JIMENA. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m FERNANDO Laínez, son of ---.”«s87» 
Alfonso V King of León (I14953)
 
179 “ALICE OF EU, Countesss of Eu, Lady of Hastings. She was heiress in 1186 to her brother, Raoul of Eu. She married before 1190 RAOUL (or RALPH) D’EXOUDUN (or D’ISSOUDUN), seigneur of Issoudun, Melle, Chize, and la Mothe-Saint-Heray, in Poitou, and in right of his wife, 7th Count of Eu, Baron of Hastings, Sussex, founder of Fontblanche Priory in Exoudun in Poitou, younger son of Hugh de Lusignan (died 1169), by his wife, Orengarde. They had two sons, Raoul (or Ralph) [8th Count of Eu] and Guarin, and two daughters, Maud and Joan (wife of Pierre de Braine, Knt., Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond). He joined the crusade in 1189 and was present at Acre in 1190. Upon his return, King Richard I granted him Drincourt castle (now Neufchatel-en-Bray) in Normandy. In 1200 he swore fealty to King John, who gave him the castle of Civray in Poitou. In 1201 King John confiscated his English possessions and his possessions in Normandy and Poitou. Raoul and his brother, Hugh, Count of La Marche, appealed to the King of France, who in 1202 overran the pays of Bray and the comté of Eu, putting him back in possession of his lands in Normandy. In 1209 Alice was subsequently confirmed in the county of Eu by King Philippe Auguste of France, she relinquishing her rights to the castles of Neufchatel, Mortemer, and Arques. In 1214 King John granted Raoul the castles of Tickhill, Yorkshire and Hastings, Sussex with the appurtenances. RAOUL D’EXOUDUN, 7th Counnt of Eu, died at Melle 1 May 1219, and was buried in Fontblanche Priory. In 1220 his widow, Alice, was sued by Robert de Vipont and his wife, Idoine (Alice’s distant Builly cousin), for the castle and vill of Tickhill, Yorkshire, which suit was unsuccessfu. In 1225 Alice’s uncle, William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, granted her the manor of Greetwell, Lincolnsire in her widowhood. In 1243 King Henry II ordered all his vassals who took the side of King Louis IX of France to forfeit their lands. Alice elected to retain her possessions in France, thereby losing the honour and castle of Tickhill. She died testate at la Mothe-Saint-Heray in Poitou 13-15 May 1246 and was buried in Fontblanche Priory.”«s79» Alice or Alix 8th Countess of Eu, Lady of Hastings (I11789)
 
180 “ALMODIS de la Marche (-murdered 16 Oct 1071). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Almodim…sororem Audeberti comitis de Marcha" and "Pontius comes Tolosanus", specifying that she was previously the wife of "Hugo Pius de Liziniaco" from whom she was separated for consanguinity and that afterwards she married "Raimundo Barcinonensi". "Poncius Tolosanæ urbis comes" named "Adalmodis uxoris mee" in his donation to Cluny dated 29 Jun 1053. The Gesta Comitum Barcinonensium records that "Petrus Raimundi" murdered his stepmother "Adalmoyn". m firstly (repudiated) HUGUES V "le Pieux" Sire de Lusignan, son of HUGUES IV "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Auliarde de Thouars (-killed in battle Lusignan 8 Oct 1060). m secondly ([1045], repudiated before 1053) as his second wife PONS II Comte de Toulouse, son of GUILLAUME III "Taillefer" Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Provence ([991]-1060, bur Toulouse, Saint-Sernin). m thirdly (1053) as his third wife, RAMÓN BERENGUER "el Viejo" Conde de Barcelona, son of BERENGUER RAMÓN "el Curvo" Conde de Barcelona & his second wife Sancha Sánchez de Castilla (1023-26 May 1076).”

From Wikipedia:
“Almodis de la Marche (990 or c. 1020 – 16 October 1071) was the daughter of Bernard I, Count of Marche and wife Amélie. She married Hugh V of Lusignan around 1038 and they had two sons and one daughter:
-Hugh VI of Lusignan (c. 1039-1101)
-Jordan de Lusignan
-Mélisende de Lusignan (b. bef. 1055), married before 1074 to Simon I "l'Archevêque", Vidame de Parthenay
Almodis and Hugh of Lusignan divorced due to consanguinity, and Hugh arranged for her to marry Count Pons of Toulouse in 1040. Together they produced several children, including:
William IV of Toulouse
Raymond IV of Toulouse
Hugh, Abbot of Saint-Gilles
Almodis of Toulouse, married Count Pierre of Melgueil
She was still Pons' wife in April 1053, but shortly thereafter Almodis was abducted by Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona. He kidnapped her from Narbonne with the aid of a fleet sent north by his ally, the Muslim emir of Tortosa. They marrieied immediately (despite the fact both of her previous husbands were still alive) and they appear with their twin sons in a charter the next year. Pope Victor II excommunicated Almodis and Ramon for this illegal marriage until 1056. Together they produced four children:
-Berenguer Ramon II, Count of Barcelona
-Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona
-Inés of Barcelona, married Count Guigues I of Albon
-Sancha of Barcelona, married Count Guillermo Ramon I of Cerdagne
Almodis maintained contact with her former husbands and many children, and in 1066/1067 she traveled to Toulouse for her daughter's wedding. A few years before, in 1060, Hugh V of Lusignan had revolted against his lord, Duke William VIII of Aquitaine, in support of Almodis' son William IV of Toulouse. Her sons supported one another in military campaigns; Hugh VI of Lusignan, Raymond IV of Toulouse, and Berenguer Ramon all took the Cross.
Her third husband Ramon had a son from a previous marriage, Pedro Ramon, who was his heir. Pedro apparently resented Almodis' influence and was concerned she was trying to replace him with her own two sons. He murdered her in October 1071. Pedro was disinherited and exiled for his crime, and fled the country. When his father died in 1076, Barcelona was split between Berenguer Ramon and Ramon Berenguer, Almodis' sons. The family history of murder did not end with Pedro Ramon, as Berenguer Ramon earned his nickname "The Fratricide" when he killed his own twin brother.”«s87» 
Almodis de la Marche (I13205)
 
181 “ALPIN (-killed in battle against the Picts in Galloway [20 Jul/Aug] 834). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. King of Kintyre [Mar/Aug] 834. m ---. The name of Alpin's wife is not known. Alpin & his wife had two children:
a) KENNETH [Cinaed] MacAlpin (-Forteviot, Perthshire 13 Feb 859, bur Isle of Iona). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which record the death in 858 of "Cinaed son of Ailpín king of the Picts". He succeeded his father in 834 as King of Galloway. He succeeded in 844 as KENNETH I King of Scotland.
b) DONALD [Domnall] (-Kinn Belachoir palace or killed in battle Scone 13 Apr 863). He succeeded his brother in 859 as DONALD I King of Scotland. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 862 of "Domnall son of Ailpín king of the Picts".

“Alpin was King of Kintyre and King of Scotland.”«s48», «s87» 
Alpin King of Kintyre (I9669)
 
182 “Ambjørg arva 3 løbbol i Kaupang som hun siden bytta
bort til sin, Olav Sjugurdsen Berg.

Kilder: Folk og fortid i Hol”«s50» 
SJUGURDSDTR, Ambjørg (I9800)
 
183 “AMEDEE [I] (-26 Jun 1178). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the son of Comte Aimon [I]. However, it is unlikely that he was the son of Ita if his date of death is correct. Comte de Genève. Avoué of Geneva 1156. m firstly (before 1131) MATHILDE de Cuiseaux, daughter of HUGUES Seigneur de Cuiseaux et de Clairvaux & his wife --- (-before 1137). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m secondly --- [de Domène], daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not yet been identified. 1147, 1170. Amedée [I] & his first wife had one child:
a) GUILLAUME [I] (-25 Jul 1196). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Genève.
Amedée [I] & his second wife had three children:
b) COMTESSON (-before 1188). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Dame de Clermont. m HENRI Sire de Faucigny, son of AIMON Sire de Faucigny & his wife --- (-14 Nov 1197).
c) BEATRIX . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m EBLES [IV] de Grandson, son of ---. 1200/1235.
d) AMEDEE (-1211). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Sire de Gex. "Amedeus dominus de Iaiz" confirmed previous donations to the Chartreuse d'Oujon, with the consent of "filiis meis Stephano et Amedeo", by charter dated 17/18 Dec 1210. m PONCIA de Thoire, daughter of --- (-[May/Oct] 1211). The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not yet been identified. Amedée & his wife had two children:
i) ETIENNE (-[1212/35]). "Amedeus dominus de Iaiz" confirmed previous donations to the Chartreuse d'Oujon, with the consent of "filiis meis Stephano et Amedeo", by charter dated 17/18 Dec 1210[373]. Sire de Gex.
ii) AMEDEE (-14 or 16 Feb 1247). "Amedeus dominus de Iaiz" confirmed previous donations to the Chartreuse d'Oujon, with the consent of "filiis meis Stephano et Amedeo", by charter dated 17/18 Dec 1210[374]. Sire de Gex. "Amedeus dominus de JaJayz" certifies a renunciation of rights by "D. Memerius miles de Versenai", by charter dated 1234. m (before 4 Jun 1227) BEATRIX de Bâgé, daughter of ULRIC [V] Sire de Bâgé & his second wife Alexandrine de Vienne [Bourgogne-Comté]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Amedée & his wife had four children:
(a) son (-before 21 Nov 1251). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
(b) LEONETE (-16 Nov 1302). The marriage between "Simon fils de feu Simon de Joinville" and "Léonète fille de feu Amédée seigneur de Gex" is noted in the charter dated Jan 1252, under which Simon also promises "Pierre de Savoie et Philippe évêque de Lyon" to pay the dowry of "chacune de ses belles-sœurs Marguerite et Isabelle, filles dudit Amédée". Dame de Gex. m (Jan 1252) SIMON de Joinville, son of SIMON Seigneur de Joinville & his second wife Beatrix d'Auxonne [Bourgogne-Comté] (-3 Jun 1276). Sire de Marnay. Sire de Gex.
(c) MARGUERITE (-after Jan 1252). The marriage between "Simon fils de feu Simon de Joinville" and "Léonète fille de feu Amédée seigneur de Gex" is noted in the charter dated Jan 1252, under which Simon also promises "Pierre de Savoie et Philippe évêque de Lyon" to pay the dowry of "chacune de ses belles-sœurs Marguerite et Isabelle, filles dudit Amédée".
(d) ISABELLE (-after Jan 1252). The marriage between "Simon fils de feu Simon de Joinville" and "Léonète fille de feu Amédée seigneur de Gex" is noted in the charter dated Jan 1252, under which Simon also promises "Pierre de Savoie et Philippe évêque de Lyon" to pay the dowry of "chacune de ses belles-sœurs Marguerite et Isabelle, filles dudit Amédée".”«s87» 
Amedee I Comte de Genève (I15641)
 
184 “AMEDEE de Maurienne, son of HUMBERT II "le Renforcé" Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie & his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne [Comté] (Montmélian [1095]-Nicosia 30 Aug 1148). The primary source which confirms his parentage directly has not yet been idenntified, although "Guido Viennensis archiepiscopus" (who was his maternal uncle) addressed a letter to "nepoti suo Amedeo comiti" dated [1115]. He succeeded in 1109 as AMEDEE III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie. The emperor recognised his titlle as Count of the Holy Roman Empire in 1111. Comte Amédée arranged the marriage of his sister to Louis VI King of France, consolidating the close relations established by his father with France. Lay-abbot of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune, until 1116. He recovered the county of Turin, lost by his father. He accompanied his nephew Louis VII King of France on crusade but died in Cyprus. The first known use of the white cross on a red background as the arms of the House of Savoy was in a charter dated 1143.
m firstly ([1120/23]) ADELAIDE, daughter of ---. Marie-José names Adelaide as the first wife of Comte Amédée III. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Europäische Stammtafeln shows the single marriage of Comte Amédée III, to Mathilde d'Albon, in 1123. Given the likely birth dates of Alix de Savoie, oldest daughter of Comte Amédée, and of Mathilde d'Albon (see below), it is unlikely that Mathilde was the mother of Alix. A first marriage of Comte Amédée is therefore highly probable. Palluel shows Comte Amédée III's first wife as Gertrude de Lorraine, daughter of Simon I Duke of Lorraine. This can be dismissed as incorrect. Neither Europäische Stammtafeln nor Poull refer to any such daughter of Duke Simon. In addition, bearing in mind that Duke Simon himself was probably born in 1096, it is chronologically impossible for any daughter of his to have given birth to a child in [1123/25]. Her marriage date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of the couple's supposed elder daughter, Alix de Savoie, as shown below. The origin of Adelaide is unknown. However, according to Europäische Stammtafeln, her supposed daughter Alix was Dame de Châteauneuf-en-Valromey, de Virieu-le-Grand, et de Cordon-en-Bugey. Further research to trace the ownership of these fiefdoms may provide clues about the identity of Adelaide.
m secondly ([1134/35]) MATHILDE d'Albon, daughter of GUIGUES VI Comte d'Albon [Viennois] & his second wife Mathilde "Regina" --- ([1112/16]-after Jan 1145). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Europäische Stammtafeln[100] shows a single marriage of Comte Amédée III, to Mathilde d'Albon, in 1123. It is more likely that Mathilde was his second wife, as explained above, especially if her likely birth date range is correct. Accordining to Europäische Stammtafeln, Mathilde's parents were married in [1106-1110]. The same table shows that Mathilde's two brothers, Guigues and Humbert, were mentioned in 1110, indicating that the marriage must have taken place during the earlieier part of this date range. A third child, Gersende d'Albon, must also have born during the early years of her parents' marriage as she herself gave birth to two sons before (or shortly after) the death of her husband in Oct 1129. Assuming all these dates are correct, the timescale is tight for the birth of a fourth child, Mathilde, before 1112 at the earliest. This would make it impossible for Mathilde to have been the mother of Comte Amédée's oldest daughter Alix.
Comte Amédée III & his first wife had two children:
1. ALIX [Elise] de Savoie ([1123/25]-). She is named as wife of Humbert in a Beaujeu charter. Her origin is also alluded to in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which names "pater Wichardi [de Belloico] senior Humbertus" as "nepos ex sorore comitis Sabaudie", although she is not named in this source. Her birth date range is estimated based on the birth of her second son in 1142, as shown in Europäische Stammtafeln. Dame de Châteauneuf-en-Valromey, de Virieu-le-Grand, et de Cordon-en-Bugey. m ([1140]) HUMBERT [III] Sire de Beaujeu, son of GUICHARD [III] Sire de Beaujeu & his wife Lucienne de Rochefort ([1120]-[1192]).
2. MATHILDE de Savoie ([1125][106]-Coimbra 4 Nov 1157, bur Coimbra, Church of the Cross). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the wife of "Aldefonsus rex Portugallie" as "filia comitis Sabaudie" but does not name her. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. It is likely that Mathilde was the daughter of Comte Amédée III's first marriage, although no proof has been found that this is correct. As she gave birth to her first child in 1147, it is improbable that she was the daughter of Comte Amédée III's marriage with Mathilde d'Albon for the same reasons of chronology as explained above. She was known as dona MAFALDA in Portugal. m ([Jan/Jun] 1146) dom AFONSO I King of Portugal, son of dom HENRIQUE Count of Portugal [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Infanta doña Teresa de Castilla y León, Queen of Portugal (Guimaraes 25 Jul 1110-Coimbra 6 Dec 1185, bur Coimbra, Church of the Cross).
Comte Amédée III & his second wife had eight children:
3. HUMBERT de Savoie, son of (Avigliana 4 Aug 1136-Chambéry 4 Mar 1189, bur Abbaye de Hautecombe). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded in 1150 as HUMBERT III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie.
4. JEAN de Savoie. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Monk at the monastery of Sant'Antonio di Ranverso.
5. PIERRE de Savoie. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Monk at the monastery of Sant'Antonio di Ranverso.
6. GUILLAUME de Savoie. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Priest.
7. AGNES de Savoie (-before 1172). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m as his first wife, GUILLAUME de Genève, son of AMEDEE I Comte de Genève & his first wife Mathilde de Cuiseaux ([1131/37]-25 Jul 1196). He succeeded his father in 1178 as Comte de Genève.
8. MARGUERITE de Savoie (-after 1157). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. She founded the Cistercian abbey of Bond.
9. ISABELLE de Savoie . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
10. JULIANE de Savoie (-31 Dec 1194). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Abbess of Saint-André-le-Haut, Vienne.”«s87» 
Amedee III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie (I15130)
 
185 “AMEDEE, son of --- (-after 827). He owned land as vassal of the abbey of St Bénigne, and land at Lecey as vassal of the bishop of Langres. m ---. The identity of the wife of Amedée is not known.
Amedée & his wife had two children:
1. ANSCHIER (-[1 Dec 898/Mar 902]). The primary source which corroborates his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte d’Oscheret 877-888. Counsellor of Boson King of [Provence]. Together with his brother and Foulques Archbishop of Reims, he invited Guido II Duke of Spoleto to become king of France in opposition to Emperor Karl III “der Dicke” who had delivered Burgundy to the Vikings after his accession in 884. Anschier accompanied Guido back to Italy after the election of Eudes as king of France in 888. In Italy, he remained as counsellor to Guido di Spoleto, took part in the campaigns against Arnulf King of Germany who invaded Italy in 894 and 896, and became Marchese di Ivrea in [898/902].
2. GUY (-killed in battle near the River Trebbia early 889). Comte d’Atuyer. A supporter of Charles II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks. Together with his brother and Foulques Archbishop of Reims, he invited Guido II Duke of Spoleto to become king of France to oppose Emperor Karl III "der Dicke" who had delivered Burgundy to the Vikings after his accession in 884. He accompanied Guido back to Italy after the election of Eudes as king of France in 888.”«s87» 
Amedee (I13866)
 
186 “ANARAWD ap Rhodri, son of RHODRI Mawr ("the Great") King of Gwynedd & his wife Angharad of Seisyllwg (-916). He succeeded his father in 878 as ANARAWD King of Gwynedd. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 915 of "Anaraut rex".
1. IDWAL Foel/the Bald (-killed in battle 943). He succeeded his father in 916 as IDWAL King of Gwynedd. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Iudgual filius Rodri et filius eius Elized" were killed by the Saxons in 943.
a) ELISSED (-killed in battle 943). The Annales Cambriæ record that "Iudgual filius Rodri et filius eius Elized" were killed by the Saxons in 943.
i) PRAUST . m SEISELL .
b) MEURIC (-986). The Annales Cambriæ record that "Meuric filius Idwal" was blinded, undated, and in a later passage (also undated) that he was killed.
i) IDWAL (-996). The Annales Cambriæ record that "Idwal filius Meuruc" was killed, undated.
(a) IAGO ab Idwal (-1039). He succeeded in 1033 as IAGO King of Gwynedd.
c) IAGO (-985). He succeeded in 950 as IAGO joint King of Gwynedd, jointly with his brother. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Iago et Idwal filii Idwal" laid waste to "Dewet" in 952. He was deposed in 969.
d) IDWAL (-979). He succeeded in 950 as IDWAL joint King of Gwynedd, jointly with his brother. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Iago et Idwal filii Idwal" laid waste to "Dewet" in 952.
e) RHODRI (-968). The Annales Cambriæ record the death of "Rodri filius Idwal", killed, undated.
f) AGNAN .«s87» 
AP RHODRI, Anarawd King of Gwynedd (I13477)
 
187 “Another name for Adelgis was Adelgis DI SPOLETO Count of Senlis and Spoleto.”«s60» Adelgis Conte di Parma (I10647)
 
188 “Another name for Gondulfus was Mummolin.”

“Gondolfus, Bishop of Tongres was the secondary patron of the city and church of Maastricht.

Mayor of the Palace in Neustria (566)

His body, and that of St. Monulphus, was solemnly exhumed in 1039 by the Bishops Nithard of Liège and Gérard of Cambrai. An epitaph commemorating this event was afterwards misinterpreted, and gave rise to a legend according to which the two saints arose from their tomb in 1039 in order to assist at the dedication of the church of Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle), and at the conclusion of the ceremony returned to their tomb to resume their eternal sleep.”«s60», «s60» 
Saint Gondolphus of Maastricht, Bishop of Tongeren and Maastricht (I10685)
 
189 “Another name for Kunigunda was Cunigunde DE GELLONE.”«s60» Kunigunda Queen of Italy (I10646)
 
190 “Another name for Theuderic was Natronai al-Makir Judiarch of Narbonne, Makhir of the Caliph 771-793.”

“Theodoric I of Septimania was received by Charlemagne and was given the title "King of the Jews". His ancestry is possibly one of the greatest lineages of antiquity. Theodoric, claimed (or others do for him) descent not only from the Merovingiaan Kings, but lineal descent from King David himself. Both the king and the Pope acknowledged this pedigree. Also called Makhir Natronai ben Habibi the Resh Galuta. Also called Rabbi Makir ha-David. Also called Dietrich.

"The evidence is sketchy and muddled at this distance, but a persistant account of Theodoric I has it that he was the Jewish Exilarch in Narbonne, and that he succeeded in establishing a regionally autonomous Jewish-led state around Narbonne. Makhir has been identified as being Makhir Natronai, Resh Galuta in Baghdad, ousted from that position by a cousin in 771. If true, it would be a matter of considerable interest; the Baghdad Exilarchs were reputed to be lineal descendents of the ancient Hebrew King Daviid.What is fairly clear is that Septimania achieved an independent position in this era by some means or other, with the status of a Duchy or even possibly a Kingdom."

He was sent by Haroun Al-Rashid, Calif of Baghdad to Charlemagne, King of the West at his request, who wanted to establish in Europe a middle class based on a Jewish nucleus between 786 and 793.”«s60», «s60» 
DE SEPTIMANIE, Theuderic (Thierry) I Exilarch of Narbonne in Septimania (I10990)
 
191 “ANSBERT . The Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude names “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania” when recording his marriage. A 9th century genealogy names "Ansbertus…ex genere senatorum", his brothers "Deotarium, Firminum, Gamardum, Aigulfum episcopum et Ragnifridum" and their supposed descendants, Ansbert's marriage to "filiam Hlotarii regis Francorum…Blithildem" and their children as shown below. m BILICHILDIS, daughter of CLOTAIRE I [Chlothachar] King of the Franks & his third wife Ingundis [Ingonde] ([525/40]-). The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius…rex" had seven children by "Ingunde", the same six as are named in Gregory of Tours with a marginal note adding "Blitchildim" as the seventh child and speecifying that she married "Ansbertus nobilissimus" and by him was mother of "Arnoldum". An alternative origin for Bilichildis is provided by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Dagobertum Regem et Blithildem sororem eius” aas children of “Lotharius…[et] Beretrudam” (chronologically impossible if she was the grandmother of Arnoul Bishop of Metz, see below), but commenting that “others say” that Bilichildis was the daughter of “primi Lotharii avi istius”, adding thahat Bilichildis married “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania”. The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names "Hlotharius [rex]…filia…Blithild" and records her marriage to "Ansbertus". The recorded names of the alleged children of Bilichildis do not have a Merovingian ring about them. It is uncertain whether Bilichildis existed at all or whether she and her family were invented for the purposes of compiling a Merovingian descent for the Carolingian dynasty, an enterprise undertaken in Metz from the late 8th century onwards (see below, under her alleged grandson). Her absence from the list of the children of King Clotaire given by Gregory of Tours certainly suggests that she was a spurious later invention, although Gregory's treatment of the families of the early Merovingians was not exhaustive, as can be seen from the examples of Berthoara, daughter of King Theodebald I, and Theodechildis sister of the same king (see above), whom Gregory does not mention at all. Settipani demonstrates convincingly that there are sufficient indications in other primary sources that parts, if not all, these reconstructions may be based on historical fact. The situation is further confused by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Adabaldus Dux, et fratres eius Herchenaldus Major-domus Occidentalis Franciæ et Sigebertus Comes” as the sons of “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania” and Bilichildis. The Chronico omits Arnold, although the mention of Ercchinoald makes it clear that this source is completely incompatible from a chronological point of view with the descent reported in the Carmen. Sifting the fact from the fiction in these two sources is inevitably speculative. Ansbert & his wife had [four] children:
a) [ARNOLD . The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Arnoldum" as the son of "Ansbertus" & his wife. The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names (in order) "Arnoldum primogenitum…Feriolum…Modericus…Tharsicia" as the four children of "Ansbertus" & his wife. A 9th century genealogy names "primogenitus Arnoaldus…" as oldest son of Ansbert & his wife.]
i) [ARNOUL ([580/85]-Remiremont 18 Jul [640], bur Remiremont, later transferred to Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). A 9th century genealogy names "beatum Arnulfum episcopum" as the son of Arnold, and Arnulf's sons "Flodulfum, Wallchisum et Ancnchisum". Settipani points out that this formed part of a series of genealogies compiled at Metz, from the late 8th century onwards, to glorify the ancestry of the Carolingian dynasty by establishing their descent from the early Merovingians and also from a family of Roman senatorial origin. The earlier Vita Sancti Arnulfi names "Arnulfus episcopus prosapia genitus Francorum" but gives no further details of his ancestry. Another genealogy from the same period does not attempt to trace Arnoul's ancestors further than naming "Buotgisus" as father of "Arnulfum…episcopum urbis Metensium", although the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ in which this is published cites another source which names "Burtgisus, qui a multis cognominatur Arnoaldus" although the dating of the latter is unclear.]
b) [FERIOLUS . The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names (in order) "Arnoldum primogenitum…Feriolum…Modericus …Tharsicia" as the four children of "Ansbertus" & his wife.]
c) [MODERICUS . The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names (in order) "Arnoldum primogenitum…Feriolum…Modericus …Tharsicia" as the four children of "Ansbertus" & his wife, recording that Modericus was "in ordine frater".]
d) [THARSICIA . The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names (in order) "Arnoldum primogenitum…Feriolum…Modericus …Tharsicia" as the four children of "Ansbertus" & his wife, recording that Tharsicia was "puella dei".]”«s87» 
Ansbert (Ansbertus or Ausbert) (I10776)
 
192 “ANSCHITIL, son of ---. Vicomte. His name suggests a Viking origin.
m ---. The name of Anschitil's wife is not known.
Anschitil & his wife had one child.”«s87» 
Anschitil (I14775)
 
193 “ANSEGISEL ([612]-killed [662]). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names (in order) "duos filios Anschisum et Chlodolfum" as sons of Arnulf "iuventutis suæ tempore ex legitimi matrimonii copula" but does not name their mother. The Vita Chrodegangi Episcopi Mettensis; names "Anchisæ" as second son of "Arnulfum sanctum" “…necnon et domesticorum Flodulfi, Ansigisili, Bettelini, Gariberti” consented to a donation to the monastery of Stabulo and Malmédy by King Sigebert III in a charter dated to [648]. "Childericus rex Francorum, Emnehildis et Bilihildis…reginæ…Gundoino duce et Hodone domestico" confirmed the property of the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy on the advice of "Grimoaldo, Fulcoaldo, Adregisilo, Bobone ducibus, Chlododulfo, Ansegisilo, Gariberto domesticis" by charter dated 6 Sep 667, although the presence of "Grimoaldo" in the document ten years after the attested death of the only known Duke Grimoald suggests that the document may have been subject to some alteration. He was killed by a nobleman Gundoen. m ([643/44]) BEGGA, daughter of PEPIN [I] "l'Ancien" or "de Landen", maior domus of King Clotaire II & his wife Itta --- (-693). The Cronica Hohenburgensis names "huius soror [beata Gerdrudis] Begga" as wife of "Angiso sancti Arnulfi filio". Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Pippinus…principes Francorum…sanctæ Beggæ matris eius". She founded the Abbey of Andenne, near Namur, 691 with nuns from the Abbey of Nivelle. The Annales Xantenses record the death in 698 of "Sancta Begga mater Pippini ducis". Ansegisel & his wife had [two] children:
a) PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal" ([645]-Jupille, near Liège 16 Dec 714, bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Anschisus" as father of "Pippinum". "Pippinus filius Ansegisili quondam necnon…matrone mea Plectrudis" donated property to the church of St Arnulf at Metz by charter dated 20 Feb 691. He defeated his adversaries at Tertry, Somme in Jun 687 before becoming maior domus of Austrasia in [688/90].
b) [CHROTHECHILDIS [Rotilde] [Doda] (-692 or after). Settipani approves the theory of Maurice Chaume according to which the wife of King Theoderic III was the daughter of Ansegisel. However, this does not appear to be directly supported by primary source evidence. "Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property at the request of "regine nostre Chrodochilde…et…Berchario maiorem domos nostre" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 30 Oct 688. "Chrotechildis regina" is named mother oof King Clovis III in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin. She was regent for her son King Chlodovech III until 692. The epitaph of King Theoderic III and his wife bore the inscription "rex Theodericus…cum coniuge Doda", assumed to be another name by which Rotilde was known. m THEODERIC III King of the Franks in Neustria, son of CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria & his wife Bathildis --- ([651]-[2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691], bur Arras, basilique Saint-Vaast).]”«s87» 
Ansegisel (Anchises) Mayor of the Palace in Austrasia (I10675)
 
194 “ANSELME de Saint-Pol "Candavène", son of HUGUES [III] "Candavène" Comte de Saint-Pol & his first wife --- (-1175 or after). "Hugo Candavene" founded the abbey of Cercamp, with the consent of "filii eius Engelrandus et Hugo, Anselmus, Radulfulfus et Wido", by charter dated 1137[547]. "Ingelrannus…de Sancto Paulo comes" donated property to the church of Thérouanne with the consent of "Anselmo fratre meo" by charter dated 1153. Seigneur de Lucheux 1162. Seigneur de Tarentefirt 1169. Comte de Saint-Pol 1170.
m firstly ---.
m secondly EUSTACHIE, divorced wife of GEOFFREY de Mandeville Earl of Essex, daughter of --- & his wife Isabelle (-before 12 Nov 1164). Relative of Henry II King of England.
m thirdly as her first husband, MATHILDE, daughter of ---. 1202. She married secondly Hugues de Chaumont.
Comte Anselme & his first wife had five children:
1. ENGUERRAND de Saint-Pol . Seigneur de Beauval 1164/1188.
2. MARGUERITE de Saint-Pol . 1183/1219. m (before 1190) DREUX Châtelain d'Amiens, son of --- (-before 1195).
3. FLANDRINE de Saint-Pol . ---. The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "Flandrinam comitis Sancti-Pauli Hugonis neptem" as wife of "Willelmum de Ghisnis [filium Willelmi Andomarensis castellanus]". 1202. m GUILLAUME de Guines, son of ARNOUL [I] Comte de Guines & his wife Mathilde de Saint-Omer. 1177/1217.
4. MARIE de Saint-Pol . 1202.
5. BEATRIX de Saint-Pol . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. "Johannes comes Pontivi" confirmed rights of the monks of Val, with the consent of "Guidonis fratris mei et Beatricis comitisse uxoris mee", by charter dated 1177, which also names "mater mea Ida comitissa". 1202. m (before 4 Dec 1170) as his third wife, JEAN [I] Comte de Ponthieu, son of GUY [II] Comte de Ponthieu & his wife Ida --- (-Acre 30 Jun 1191).
Comte Anselme & his third wife had two children:
6. HUGUES [IV] de Saint-Pol "Candavène" (-Feb 1205). Comte de Saint-Pol 1175. On crusade 1192 and 1200. "Hugo comes Sancti Pauli et Ida uxor mea" donated property to the church of Thérouanne with the consent of "generorum meorum Galteri de CaCastellione et Johannis dominis de Nigella et filiarum mearum Elilzabeth et Eustachie" by charter dated Jan [1201/02]. Lord of Didymotika 1204. m ([1178]) as her second husband, YOLANDE de Hainaut, widow of IVES [II] de Nesle Comte de Soissonss, daughter of BAUDOUIN IV Comte de Hainaut & his wife Alix de Namur ([1131/35]-after Apr 1202). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Yolandem, Agnetem, Lauretam" as the daughters of "Alidis comitissa Hanonensis …cum viro Balduino comite"", specifying that Yolande married firstly "Ivo senior…comes Suessonis dominusque Nigelle", but was childless by her first husband, and married secondly "Hugonis Sancti Pauli", recording in a later passage that she was 47 years old at the time oof her second marriage in 1178, although her age is probably exaggerated considering that she gave birth to two children by her second husband. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "comitem Balduinum, Henricum de Seburgrgo et quatuor sorores" as children of "comiti Balduini de Haynaco", naming one daughter (second among those listed) "cometissa Suessionensis Hyolenz" specifying that she later married "comiti Hugoni de Sancto Paulo". "Hugo comes Sancti Pauli et Ida uxor mea" donated property to the church of Thérouanne by charter dated Jan [1201/02][555], "Ida" in this document presumably being an error for "Yolande". Comte Hugues [IV] & his wife had two children:
a) ELISABETH de Saint-Pol ([1179]-before 1240). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Elizabeth et Eustachium" as the children of "Hugonis Sancti Pauli" & his wife. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Ysabellam uxorem comitis Galtheri de Castellione, qui per uxorem factus est comes de Sancto Paulo, et Eustaciam uxorem Iohannis de Nigella" as children of "comiti Hugoni de Sancto Paulo" & his wife. "Hugo comes Sancti Pauli et Ida uxor mea" donated property to the church of Thérouanne with the consent of "generorum meorum Galteri de Castellione et Johannis dominis de Nigella et filiarum mearum Elilzabeth et Eustachie" by charter dated Jan [1201/02]. "Galcherius de Castelione montis Gaii dominus" donated property to Tremblay "pro salute anima…fratris mei Guidonis" with the consent of "Elisabeth uxoris mee" by charter dated Jan 1205. Ctss de Saint-Pol 1205. The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium refers to the wife of "Waltheri de Castellione" as "fililiam Hugonis comitis Sancti-Pauli". m firstly (1196) GAUCHER [III] Seigneur de Châtillon-sur-Marne, son of GUY [II] Seigneur de Châtillon & his wife Alix de Dreux [Capet] (-killed in battle Oct 1219). Comte de Saint-Pol. m secondly (1231) JEAN de Béthune (-before 1240).
b) EUSTACHE de Saint-Pol ([1180]-before 1241). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Elizabeth et Eustachium" as the children of "Hugonis Sancti Pauli" & his wife. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Ysabellam uxorem comitis Galtheri de Castellione, qui per uxorem factus est comes de Sancto Paulo, et Eustaciam uxorem Iohannis de Nigella" as children of "comiti Hugoni de Sancto Paulo" & his wife. "Hugo comes Sancti Pauli et Ida uxor mea" donated property to the chchurch of Thérouanne with the consent of "generorum meorum Galteri de Castellione et Johannis dominis de Nigella et filiarum mearum Elilzabeth et Eustachie" by charter dated Jan [1201/02]. m (before 1200) JEAN [II] de Nesle, son of JEAN Seigneur de Nesle, de Falvy et de Hérelle & his wife Elisabeth van Peteghem (-23 Dec 1239). Burggraf of Bruges 1200.
7. GUY de Saint-Pol (-1202 or after). Seneschal of Ponthieu 1196/1197.”«s87» 
Anselme “Candavène” Comte de Saint-Pol (I15524)
 
195 “ANSFRID, son of --- . His name and that of his son suggest that this family was of Viking origin, which is confirmed by Guillaume de Jumièges who names "Toustain surnommé Guz, fils d'Ansfroi le Danois".
m ---. The name of Ansfrid's wife is not known. Ansfrid & his wife had one child.”

Wikipedia entry for son "Richard le Goz" lists Richard's grandfather as "Ansfred the Dane." 
Ansfrid (I14781)
 
196 “ANTHONY FISHER... was baptized 1 February 1558/9 at Stradbroke, and he was buried 11 April 1640 at Syleham. He married at Fressingfield, 16 October 1586, MARIE FISKE, daughter of Nicholas and Johane (Crispe) Fiske of Laxfield and Dennington. Some of Marie’s ancestry will be presented by Clifford L. Stott in “The Crispe Family of Laxfield, Suffolk; Ancestors of Anthony and Joshua Fisher of Dedham, Massachusetts,” forthcoming in the Register.
Anthony was named in various wills. In 1591 his father William mentioned that he had already given land to Anthony, and that other lands, in Syleham (among them Wignotts), should be Anthony’s after his mother’s death. Anthony’s brother William, in 1618, named Anthony and his children. Anthony and Mary’s son John in 1636 gave annuities to his parents, as did their son Cornelius in 1638. After Anthony’s death his widow Mary was appointed administratrix of his estate, 19 Apri 1640.”«s84» 
FISHER, Anthony (I12105)
 
197 “Apparently it is Thomas who moves from the earlier family possesion in Dinton to Tisbury as he would have perhaps inherited the estate of his mother, Joan Bridmore of Tisbury. Specifically, Dr. Banks (3) notes that during recent visits to England he found:

"evidence of the residence of Mayhews in Tisbury as early as 1520 indicating settlement there at a probable earlier date. Thomas Mayhew, who is considered the grandfather of Gov. Thomas, was taxed for 'goods', as of the Tithing of Tisbury, in 1540. (Sub. Roll 197/184.) In a deposition dated 30-31 Elizabeth (1589) this Thomas Mayhew deposed at the age of 80 years to events and persons known to him in that parish for the past 63 years and more. This places his birth in 1509, his knowledge of events back to 1517 and it is probable that he was born in Tisbury. He was the third son of a Robert Mayhew of Dinton, is the putative father of Matthew of Tisbury and doubtless came to be a resident of the latter named parish thhrough the marriage of his father Robert with Joan Bridmore of Tisbury. It is probable that he inherited her estate there while the eldest son and heir retained possession of the Mayhew property in Dinton. He was buried in 1590 at Tisbury. His wife Alice predeceased him in 1586."”

 «s43» 
MAYHEW, Thomas (I7762)
 
198 “ARBERT [I] de Thouars, son of AIMERY [II] Vicomte de Thouars & his [first] wife Aliénor [Hardouine] --- (-[before 13 May] 988). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars. "Guillelmus…Aquitanici ducatus comes" was present in a property transaction recorded by charter dated Jul 959 subscribed by "…Arberti vicecomiti…". "Adraldo vicecomes, Arbertus vicecomes, Kadeloni vicecomes…" subscribed the charter dated Jan 969 under which "Wilelmus…Aquitaniensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "Mainardo", at the request of "patruus noster domnus Ebolus, sancte Lemovicensis sedis episcopus atque…beati Hylarii archiclavus". "…Arberti vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated Jan [965/66] under which "Ebulus…Lemovicensium sedis episcopus" donated property to Saint-Maixent.
m ALDEARDE d'Aulnay, daughter of CADELON [II] Vicomte d'Aulnay & his first wife Sénégonde --- (-[1020]). "Senegundis" donated property "in pago Alnisio" to the Saint-Maixent by charter dated May 964 subscribed by "Cadelonis, Ebulonis, Ode, Aldeeardis, Goscelmi", "Aldeardis" presumably referring to her daughter. "Audeardis et filii meum" returned property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated 13 May 988 which refers to the burial of "Arbertum seniorem meum" and was subscribed by "…Aimerici filii sui…". "…Hildegardis matris eius…" subscribed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur. The document which links these references and confirms that Aldéarde, wife of Vicomte Arbert [I], was the daughter of Vicomte Cadelon [II] has not so far been located. She married secondly (before 13 May 988) as his second wife, Arnaud "Mancer" Comte d'Angoulême. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes…Rodulfus vicecomes et uxor eius [not named] et mater eius Heldiardis et Gosfredus frater eius".
Arbert [I] & his wife had five children:
1. AIMERY [III] (-before 1000). "Audeardis et filii meum" returned property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated 13 May 988 which refers to the burial of "Arbertum seniorem meum" and was subscribed by "…Aimerici filii sui…". Vicomte de Thouars. "…Aimerici vicecomitis…" subscribed the charter dated Dec 992 under which "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent. m firstly ELOISE, daughter of ---. "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur by charter dated [994/95]. m secondly MELISENDE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 1010. Aimery [III] & his [first/second] wife had three children:
a) ARBERT (-before 1000). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
b) EMMA . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 1010.
c) AIMERY . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1010.
2. SAVARY [III] . Vicomte de Thouars. "Aimerici vicecomitis, Savarici vicecomitis" subscribed a charter dated [975/1000] under which "Berengerius…ex parte Rorgonis consanguinei sui" donated property to St Cyprien. "Savarici vicecomitis" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004]. "…Savarici fratris eius, Radulfi fratris eius, Tetboldi fratris eius, Gauzfridi fratris eius, Hildegardis matris eius…" subscribebed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur. m ---. The name of Savary's wife is not known. Savary [III] & his wife had one child:
a) GEOFFROY [II] . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars. "Vicecomes Gaufredus" donated property "Flaheziacus sicuti fecerat avunculus meus et antecessor Radulfus" to St Cyprien by chaharter dated [1015/20] subscribed by "Willelmi comitis, Aldeardis vicecomitisse". [m firstly ALDEARDE, daughter of --- (-after [1015/20]). "Vicecomes Gaufredus" donated property "Flaheziacus sicuti fecerat avunculus meus et antecessor Radulfus" to St Cyprien by charter dated [1015/20] subscribed by "Willelmi comitis, Aldeardis vicecomitisse". It is assumed that Aldearde was the wife of Vicomte Geoffroy [II] at the date of the charter in which no other person with the title Vicomte is named.] m [secondly] ([1020/30]) ELEONORE, daughter of ---. "Wilelmo duce et Josfredo vicecomite Toarcensis castri et uxori sue…Aynors" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated [26 Mar 1027/31 Jan 1030]. "Garnisus et uxor sua Raingardis" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated [1030] subscribed by "Gaufredi vicecomitis et uxoris eius Ainoris et filii sui Aimerici". "Gaufredus Toarcensium vicecomes" donated property to St Cyprien affirmed by "mulieri sua Ainori, deine filiis suis Savarico, Radulfo et Gaufredo" by charter dated [1055/73]. Geoffroy [II] & his [second] wife had five children:
i) AIMERY [IV] (-murdered 1093, bur Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Chaise). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vicomte de Thouars.
ii) SAVARY [IV] . "Gaufredus Toarcensium vicecomes" donated property to St Cyprien affirmed by "mulieri sua Ainori, deine filiis suis Savarico, Radulfo et Gaufredo" by charter dated [1055/73]. Vicomte de Thouars. "Savarici vicecomitis et fratris eius" subscribed the charter dated [1058/68] of "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus". 1029/1093. m ---. The name of Savary's wife is not known. Savary [IV] & his wife had two children:
(a) BASILE . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
(b) GEOFFROY . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
iii) RAOUL . "Gaufredus Toarcensium vicecomes" donated property to St Cyprien affirmed by "mulieri sua Ainori, deine filiis suis Savarico, Radulfo et Gaufredo" by charter dated [1055/73].
iv) GEOFFROY . "Gaufredus Toarcensium vicecomes" donated property to St Cyprien affirmed by "mulieri sua Ainori, deine filiis suis Savarico, Radulfo et Gaufredo" by charter dated [1055/73].
v) GOGNORE . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 1088/93.
3. RAOUL [I] (-[1014/15]). "…Savarici fratris eius, Radulfi fratris eius, Tetboldi fratris eius, Gauzfridi fratris eius, Hildegardis matris eius…" subscribed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur. Vicomte de Thouars. "Radulfus vicecomes et uxor sua Aremburgis cognominibatur Ascelina et filius eorum Aimericus" donated property to St Cyprien by charter dated [1004/15] subscribed by "Gaufredi nepotis sui, Gaufredi fratris sui, Tetbaudi filii Radulfi". An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes…Rodulfus vicecomes et uxor eius [not named] et mater eius Heldiardis et Gosfredus frater eius". m firstly ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. m secondly AREMBURGIS [Aisceline], daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Raoul [I] & his first wife had one child:
a) TETBAUD . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
Raoul [I] & his second wife had two children:
b) AIMERY . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1010.
c) AULIARD . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1010.
4. THIBAUT . "…Savarici fratris eius, Radulfi fratris eius, Tetboldi fratris eius, Gauzfridi fratris eius, Hildegardis matris eius…" subscribed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur.
5. GEOFFROY . "…Savarici fratris eius, Radulfi fratris eius, Tetboldi fratris eius, Gauzfridi fratris eius, Hildegardis matris eius…" subscribed the charter dated [994/95] under which "Aimericus vicecomes Toarcensium…uxori meæ Eluis" donated property "in pago Toarcinse in vicaria ipsius castri" to the abbey of Saint-Florent near Saumur. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes…Rodulfus vicecomes et uxor eius [not named] et mater eius Heldiardis et Gosfredus frater eius". 1014.”«s87» 
Arbert I Vicomte de Thouars (I14727)
 
199 “ARNOUL [Arnulf], son of [ARNOLD & his wife ---] ([580/85]-Remiremont 18 Jul [640], bur Remiremont, later transferred to Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). The origins of Arnulf are unknown. The Vita Sancti Arnulfi names "Arnulfus episcopus proosapia genitus Francorum" but gives no further details of his ancestry. The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Arnulfus…ex nobilissimo fortissimoque Francorum stemmate ortus", with no further information on his parentage, as ninth bishop of Metz and "palatii moderator". A 9th century genealogy names "beatum Arnulfum episcopum" as the son of Arnold. Settipani points out that this genealogy forms part of a series compiled at Metz, from the late 8th century onwards, which glorify the aancestry of the Carolingian dynasty by establishing descent from the early Merovingians as well as from a family of Roman senatorial origin. Further confusion is added by the Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis which names "Agiulfus" as sixth bishop of Metz, stating that "patre ex nobili senatorum familia orto, ex Chlodovei regis Francorum filia procreatus", and that "nepos ipsius…Arnoaldus" succeeded him as bishop, the alleged senatorial and Merovingian ancestry appearing to provide the basis for the 9th century genealogy although the latter assigns the descent to what appears to be a different Arnold. The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis makes no family connection between Arnulf and his predecessor bishops. Another genealogy from the 8th/9th century names "Buotgisus" as father of "Arnulfum…episcopum urbis Metensium", although the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ in which this is published cites another source which names "Burtgisus, qui a multis cognominatur Arnoaldus" although the dating of the latter is unclear. Arnulf entered the service of Theodebert King of Austrasia, becoming intendant of the royal domains. Together with Warnachar, maior domus of the palace of Burgundy, he helped King Clotaire II defeat KKing Sigebert II and the latter's great-grandmother Queen Brunechildis in 613. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Pippinus…principes Francorum…paterni avi eius Arnulfi", specifying that he was "primo maior domus regis post Mettensis episcopus", although no other document has been found which indicates that Arnulf held the position of maior domus in Austrasia. Elected Bishop of Metz in [613], Arnulf retired to the monastery of Remiremont, Vosges in 629. A chartrter dated 20 Feb 691 of "Pippinus filius Ansegisili quondam necnon…matrone mea Plectrudis" donating property to the church of St Arnulf at Metz specifies that "domnus et avus noster Arnulphus" was buried in the church. A list of bishops of Metz records "Arnulfus" as 29th bishop, that he held the position for 10 years, and died "XVII Kal Sep".
m [DODA], daughter of ---. The 11th century life of her son Chlodulf names “mater…Chlodulfi Doda”. Settipani states that this is the only source which names Arnulf´s wife, and inevitably casts doubt on the accuracy of the source written several centuries after she lived.
Arnulf & his wife had [three] children:
1. CHLODULF ([610]-8 May [697], bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names (in order) "duos filios Anschisum et Chlodolfum" as sons of Arnulf "iuventutis suæ tempore ex legitimi matrimonii copula" but does not nname their mother. The Vita Chrodegangi Episcopi Mettensis names "primogenitus…Clodulfus" as one of the two sons of "Arnulfum sanctum". The Annales Xantenses names "Clodulfus" as son of "Arnulfus" when recording that he became bishop after his father died. “…necnon et domesticorum Flodulfi, Ansigisili, Bettelini, Gariberti” consented to a donation to the monastery of Stabulo and Malmédy by King Sigebert III in a charter dated to [648]. "Childericus rex Francorum, Emnehildis et Bilihildis…reginæ…Gundoino duce et Hodone domestico" confirmed the property of the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy on the advice of "Grimoaldo, Fulcoaldo, Adregisilo, Bobone ducibus, Chlodulfo, Ansegisilo, Gariberto domesticis" by charter dated 6 Sep 667, although the presence of "Grimoaldo" in the document ten years after the attested death of the only known Duke Grimoald suggests that the document may have been subject to some alteration. He was elected Bishop of Metz in 657. Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Pippinus…principes Francorum…Clodulfi Mettensis episcopi…patruus ipsius". A list of bishops of Metz records "Chlodulfus" as 32nd bishop, holding the position for 40 years and 20 days, and his death "VIII Id Mai". m [CHILDA [Hilda], daughter of ---. According to the tradition of Los, the body of St Amour was conferred to "Hilda, femme du noble Clodolfus". No other reference to the name of Chlodulf's wife has been found.] Chlodulf & his wife had [two] children:
a) [AUNULF (-before 16 Dec 714). He is named only in a charter of Emperor Otto I dated 30 Apr 948, confirming the donation to the church of Metz of property at Russon near Tongres which previously belonged to "Clodulfus … filio suo Aunulfo", and which the latter bequeathed to Pepin on dying.]
b) [MARTIN . A 9th century genealogy names "Martinum" as the son of "Flodulfus", son of "beatus Arnulfum", specifying that he killed Ebroin at "Ercriaco palatio" and was later elected a bishop. A charter dated 15 May 653, classified as spurious in the collection, of "Sigisbertus…Francorum rex" purports to record his donation to the monastery "sancti Matthiæ in prædio sancti Petri Trevericæ" and names "consanguinei nostri domini Martini filii Clodulphi filii Arnulphi ducis, ducis Austriæ Mosellanicæ ac Moselant", who is also named among the subscribers of the document.]
2. ANSEGISEL ([612]-killed [662]). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names (in order) "duos filios Anschisum et Chlodolfum" as sons of Arnulf "iuventutis suæ tempore ex legitimi matrimonii copula" but does not name their mother. The Vita Chrodegangi Episcopi Mettensis; names "Anchisæ" as second son of "Arnulfum sanctum". “…necnon et domesticorum Flodulfi, Ansigisili, Bettelini, Gariberti” consented to a donation to the monastery of Stabulo and Malmédy by King Sigebert III in a charter dated to [648]. "Childericus rex Francorum, Emnehildis et Bilihildis…reginæ…Gundoino duce et Hodone domestico" confirmed the property of the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy on the advice of "Grimoaldo, Fulcoaldo, Adregisilo, Boboone ducibus, Chlodulfo, Ansegisilo, Gariberto domesticis" by charter dated 6 Sep 667, although the presence of "Grimoaldo" in the document ten years after the attested death of the only known Duke Grimoald suggests that the document may have beeeen subject to some alteration. He was killed by a nobleman Gundoen. m ([643/44]) BEGGA, daughter of PEPIN [I] "l'Ancien" or "de Landen", maior domus of King Clotaire II & his wife Itta --- (-693). The Cronica Hohenburgensis names "huius soror [beata Gerdrudis] Begga" as wife of "Angiso sancti Arnulfi filio". Sigeberto's Vita Landiberto episcopi Traiectensis names "Pippinus…principes Francorum…sanctæ Beggæ matris eius". She founded the Abbey of Andenne, near Namur, 691 with nuns from the Abbey of Nivelle. The Annales Xantenses record the death in 698 of "Sancta Begga mater Pippini ducis". Ansegisel & his wife had [two] children:
a) PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal" ([645]-Jupille, near Liège 16 Dec 714, bur Metz, basilique de Saint-Arnoul). The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Anschisus" as father of "Pippinum". "Pippinus filius Ansegisili quondam necnon…matrone mea Plectrudis" donated property to the church of St Arnulf at Metz by charter dated 20 Feb 691. He defeated his adversaries at Tertry, Somme in Jun 687 before becoming maior domus of Austrasia in [688/90].
b) [CHROTHECHILDIS [Rotilde] [Doda] (-692 or after). Settipani approves the theory of Maurice Chaume according to which the wife of King Theoderic III was the daughter of Ansegisel. However, this does not appear to be directly supported by priimary source evidence. "Theudericus rex Francorum" donated property at the request of "regine nostre Chrodochilde…et…Berchario maiorem domos nostre" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 30 Oct 688. "Chrotechildis regina" is named mother oof King Clovis III in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin. She was regent for her son King Chlodovech III until 692. The epitaph of King Theoderic III and his wife bore the inscription "rex Theodericus…cum coniuge Doda", assumed to be another name by which Rotilde was known. m THEODERIC III King of the Franks in Neustria, son of CLOVIS II King of the Franks in Neustria & his wife Bathildis --- ([651]-[2 Sep 690/12 Apr 691], bur Arras, basilique Saint-Vaast).]
3. [WALCHISUS . The Domus Carolingiæ Genealogia names (in order) "Flodulfum, Walchisum et Anschisum" as sons of "Arnulfum episcopum", specifying that Walchisus was father of "Wandregisilum confessorem Domini". The Vita S. Wandregisili records that “Walchisus” was “consobrinus…Pippini…Principis Francorum”.] m ---. The name of Walchisus´s wife is not known. Walchisus & his wife had one child:
a) WANDREGISEL (-21 Apr 665). The Vita S. Wandregisili names “Walchisus…consobrinus…Pippini…Principis Francorum” as father of “Wandregisilus cognomento Wando”. The Gesta Abbatum Fontanellensium names "Wandregisilus" as the first abbot of Fontanelle and in a later passage specifies that he was son of "Walchisus…patruus Pippini ducis Francorum filii Anchisi". The Vita Ansberti names "princeps Pipinus Ansegisili filius" as "consobrinus…beati patris Wandragisili". The Annales Xantenses record the death in 665 of "Sanctus Wandregisilus". The Vita S. Wandregisili records the death “menso quarto, die primo et vicesimo…annus…665” aged 96 of “Beatus Wandregisilus”, although her age must be considerably exaggerated if her parentage is correctly shown here.”


“Patron Saint of Brewers

Arnulf gave distinguished service at the Austrasian court under Theudebert II (595-612). About 611 he was made bishop of Metz. In 613, Arnulf and Pippin of Landen, whose daughter Begga, had married Arnulf's son Ansegisesel, led the opposition of Frankish nobles to Queen Brunhilda of Austrasia. The revolt led to her overthrow, torture, and eventual execution, and the subsequent reunification of Frankish lands under Clotaire II, the dowager queen's nephew. Though Arnulf wanted to retreat to the Vosges mountains as a hermit, he was persuaded to stay and became the bishop of Metz.

From 623 (with Pippin of Landen, then the Mayor of the Palace), Arnulf was an adviser to Dagobert I. With his friend Romaric, he retired in 627 to a mountain site in the Vosges, to implement his lifelong resolution to become a hermit. Before he was consecrated, he had two sons by his wife Doda: Ansegisel and Chlodulf. Ansegisel married Pippin's daughter Begga, and their child was Pippin the Middle, one of Charlemagne's great-grandfathers. Chlodulf, like his father, became bishop of Metz. The existence of third son called Martin is considered dubious.”«s60», «s87» 
Arnoul (Arnulf, Arnoald, or Arnoldus) Bishop of Metz (I10774)
 
200 “ARNOUL de Chiny, son of LOUIS [II] Comte de Chiny & his wife Sophie --- (-16 Apr 1106). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Chiny. "Dux et marchio Godefridus…uxoris mee Beatricis" confirmed the rights of the church of Verdun Saint-Vanne granted by "patre meo Gozelone", with the consent of "comitis Manasse", by charter dated [1065/66], subscribed by "comitis Manasse et filii eius Rainaldi, Hezelini comitis, comitis Arnulfi de Chisneio". The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines specifies that "Arnulfus comes Chisniaci" was also "comes de Givel et de Warc". He founded Orval in 1097. The Chronicon Sancti Huberti records that "Arnulfus comes Chisniacensis" became a monk "in hoc loco Kal Apr…XVI Kal Mai obit".
m firstly ADELA de Ramerupt, daughter of HILDUIN [IV] de Montdidier et de Ramerupt Comte de Roucy & his wife Adelaide de Roucy (-[1068/69], bur Abbaie St Hubert, Ardennes). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Adele" as seventh daughter of Ebles Comte de Roucy and names her husband "Arnulfo comiti de Chisneio", although the chronology favours Adela being the sister rather than daughter of Ebles. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis clarifies the question when it refers to, but does not name, "quintam…Hilduini comitis filiam" as wife of "Arnulfus comes de Cinni". The Chronicon Sancti Huberti names "Adelaidis…soror Ebali Roceiensis" as wife of "Arnulfi", specifying that she was buried in the church of St Hubert.
m secondly ERMENGARDE, daughter of --- (-before 1081). The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
m thirdly AGNES, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
Arnoul & his first wife had six children:
1. OTTO [II] (-1131 or after).
2. LOUIS . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1097/1124.
3. HADWIG . The Chronicon Sancti Huberti names "Galteri et fratris eius Dodonis et uxoris eius Hawidis filiæ Arnulfi comitis", implying that "Galteri" was husband of Hawide. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the husband of "reliqua soror Ottonis" as "Dodoni de Cons". 1088. m DODON de Cons . 1088.
4. CLEMENTIA . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m HUGEL de Waha Châtelain de Mirwart, son of BOVO de Duras & his wife [Beatrix de Laroche].
5. BEATRIX . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.
6. daughter . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the children of "soror Ottonis" as "Arnulfum Treverensem archidiaconum et Cononem ". This presumably refers to one of the daughters of Comte Arnoul named above but it is not known which. m ---. This couple had two children:
a) ARNOUL . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the children of "soror Ottonis" as "Arnulfum Treverensem archidiaconum et Cononem ". Archdeacon of Trier.
b) CONON . The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the children of "soror Ottonis" as "Arnulfum Treverensem archidiaconum et Cononem ".
Arnoul & his third wife had one child:
7. ADALBERO (-1156). The Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium names "Alberonem, ecclesiæ suæ [=Virdunensis] archidiaconum, filium Arnulfi comitis Chisneiensium" when recording his election as Bishop of Verdun. Bishop of Verdun 1131.”«s87» 
Arnoul Comte de Chiny (I15952)
 
201 “ARNOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders & his wife Ælfthryth of Wessex ([885/890]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Ghent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus". "Arnulfus" is named as son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders. He was responsible for a major expansioion of Flemish territory to the south. He and his brother joined the expedition of Raoul King of the Franks against the Normans in 925 and captured Eu. Count Arnoul inflicted a heavy defeat on the Normans in 926. In 932, he seized the abbey oof St Vaast, as well as Douai in Ostrevant. In 933, after his brother's death, he seized Boulonnais and Ternois, disinheriting his nephews. He made an alliance with Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in 934, sealed by his marriage to the latter's daughter. Responding to raids by Guillaume Comte [de Normandie], Count Arnoul invaded Ponthieu and captured Montreuil in 939 from Herluin Comte de Ponthieu, but the county was later recaptured by Comte Guillaume's forces. After agreeing to meet Count Guillaume in 942 to settle the dispute over Montreuil, Guillaume was murdered presumably at Count Arnoul's instigation. Count Arnoul was secure in his possession of Montreuil by 949. After the death of his son in 962, Count Arnoul was obliged to cede Artois, Ostrevant, Ponthieu and Amiens to Lothaire King of the West Franks in order to ensure the latter's support for the succession of Count Arnoul's infant grandson to the county of Flanders. Comte Arnoul was allegedly murdered by Heluin in revenge for the murder of Guillaume I Comte de Normandie. The Annales Blandinienses record the death "VI Kal Apr 964" of "Magnus Arnulfus, restaurator huius Blandiniensis coenobii".
[m firstly ---. Both Rösch and Europäische Stammtafeln state that Count Arnoul had another wife before marrying Adela de Vermandois. No evidence has been found concerning this supposed first marriage. However, as discussed below, the estimated birth date of his supposed daughter Hildegard, as well as his own age when he married Adela de Vermandois, both suggest an earlier marriage. Although logic points to such a first marriage, doubt remains. The genealogical traces of this family are well marked in numerous contemporary sources. It is difficult to imagine that all of them would have ignored an earlier marriage of Comte Arnoul, who was such a prominent figure in his day.]
m [secondly] (934) ADELA de Vermandois, daughter of HERIBERT [II] Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Adela [Capet] ([915]-[Bruges 10 Oct] 960, bur Ghent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Adelam, domni Heriberti comitis filiam" as wife of "comes Arnulfus", specifying that she was "duorum Francorum regum, Odonis atque Rotberti, neptem". "Adala coniunx Arnulfi" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the marriage [undated between 931 and 949] of "Arnulfus" and "Adelam, filiam Heriberti Vermandorum comitis". Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance made in 934 between her father and her future husband. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 960 of "Adala comitissa".
Count Arnoul I & his [first] wife had one child:
1. [HILDEGARD (before 933-10 Apr 990, bur Egmond). The Annales Egmundani name "Hildegardis comitissa" as wife of "Theodericus comes secundus [Hollandensium]" but do not give her origin. "Theodericus comes et uxor sua Hildegardis" are named iin a charter dated Oct [967/79]. "Theoderici et Hildegardis" subscribed a charter dated 30 Sep 975, before "Arnulfi filii eorum [Theoderici et Hildegardis]". The wife of Count Dirk II was the daughter of Count Arnoul according to Rösch, but the author cites no primary source in support of the assertion. Hildegard's naming her two sons Arnulf and Egbert suggests that the affiliation may be correct. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Hildegard was the daughter of Count Arnoul by Adela de Vermandois and born in [934]. This appears difficult to sustain chronologically if Hildegard's first son was born in [950], but is not impossible. In addition, assuming that her sister Liutgard was born in 935, there appears little time for the birth of an earlier daughter after Count Arnoul's marriage in 934, assuming also that the latter date is correct. This suggests that, if Hildegard was the daughter of Count Arnoul, she was born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Dirk II married "Hildegardim (ut creditor) filiam Ludovici regis Francie". This is chronologically impossible, assuming that the birth date of Arnoul Count of Holland is correctly estiimated as shown in the document HOLLAND, as Hildegard daughter of Louis III King of France would have been too old for the marriage and any daughter of Louis IV King of France would have been too young. It is also unlikely that the wife of Count Dirk II was a daughter of Charles III "le Simple" King of France, the birth dates of whose daughters are estimated to [908/16]. There therefore seems no possibility that the Chronologia could even be partially correct in assigning this possible Carolingian French origin to Dirk's wife, although it is curious how this origin came to be included in the source. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "III Id Apr" of "Hildegardis…sua conthoralis" and her burial at Egmond monnastery. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "III Id Apr" of "Hildegardis…sua conthoralis" and her burial at Egmond monastery. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV Id Apr" of "Hildegardis uxor [Theoderici 2 comitis] filia Ludovici regis Francie". Europäische Stammtafeln shows 990 as her year of death, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. m ([945/50]) DIRK II Count Holland, son of DIRK I Count of Holland & his wife Geva --- ([930]-Egmond 6 May 988, bur Egmond).]
Count Arnoul I & his [second] wife had four children:
2. LIUTGARD de Flandre (935-962, before 18 Oct). The Iohannis de Thilrode Chronicon records the donation dated 962 by "Wicmannus comes…pro remedio anima coniugis mea Lietgardis…Arnulphi marchisi Flandrie patris" of "villam Thessela…Desselbergine" to "monasterio Sancti Petri in Blandino". The Annales Blandinienses record the deaths in 962 of "Baldwinus, filius Arnulfi marchisi, et soror eius Liutgardis". m ([950]) WICHMANN [IV] Graaf van Hamaland, son of --- [Billung] & his wife Gerberga --- ([930]-after 27 Sep 979).
3. EGBERT de Flandre ([937]-before 10 Jul 953). He is named as deceased son of Count Arnoul in a charter dated 10 Jul 953.
4. BAUDOUIN de Flandres ([940]-Abbey of St Bertin 1 Jan 962). His parentage is specified in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He ruled with his father from 958 as BAUDOUIN III Joint Count of Flanders and Artois, his father granting him the administration of the south of the country. The Annales Blandinienses record the deaths in 962 of "Baldwinus, filius Arnulfi marchisi, et soror eius Liutgardis". The Annales Egmundani record the death in 962 of "Baldwinus filius Arnulfi marchisi Flandrensium". m ([951/59]) as her first husband, MECHTILD of Saxony, daughter of HERMANN Billung Duke in Saxony & his [first/second] wife [Oda ---/Hildesuit ---] ([942]-Ghent 25 May 1008, bur Ghent St Peter). "Mathilda Saxonici generic" is named wife of Count Baudouin in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bennonis ducis, qui et Bernhardus et Liudigeri comitis et Machtildis comitisse" as brothers and sister of "domna Suanehildis [filia] Herimanni ducis de Liuniburh", recording the names of Mechtild's two husbands. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Mathildis, filiam principis Herimanni" as wife of "Balduinum [filius comitis Arnulfi]", specifying that it was hoped the couple would have many children. This suggests that their marriage date may have been some years earlier than 961 considering that the Genealogia was supposedly compiled in [951/59], probably during the earlier part of this date range considering which children of Louis IV King of the West Franks are named in the document. She married secondly ([963]) Godefroi Comte de Verdun [Wigeriche] (-3/4 Sep after 995, bur Gent St Peter). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mathildis comitissa Saxonie" as wife of "Godefridi Ardennensis". The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1008 of "Mathildis comitissa". The Necrology of Lüneburg records the death "25 May" of "Mattild com". Baudouin III & his wife had one child:
a) ARNOUL de Flandre ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Ghent). The Annales Elnonenses Minores records "Arnulfus, filius Balduini ex Matilde" succeeding his grandfather in 964 as ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders.
Baudouin III had one possible illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:
b) [ALBERIC [Albert] ([960/62]-1018). The Gesta Episcoporum Camerancensium name "Azelinus, de Truncinis villa, Balduini Flandrensium comitis de concubina filius", specifying that he was later appointed Bishop of Paris, in the passage recording the succession of "Erluinus" as Bishop of Cambrai (in 995). Bishop of Paris 1016-1018. According to the Dictionnaire de Biographie Française, "Albert" was provost at Tronchiennes 951-977 but this is chronologically impossible assuming this refers to the same person. If the information about his paternity is correct, Baudouin III is the only count of that name in Flanders who could have been his father. Another possibility is that the chronicle was in error and that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Baudouin IV Count of Flanders, who was count at the time the text was written but who would have been too young to have been Alberic's father.]
5. ELSTRUDE de Flandre (-966[136] or after). The Historia Comitum Ghisnensium names "comes Balduinus sororem…Elstrudem" as wife of "Sifridus". According to the Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini, the couple were never married. m ([960/65]) SIEGFRIED Comte de Guines, son of --- (-[965]).”

From Wikipedia:
“Arnulf I of Flanders (c. 890 – March 28, 965), called the Great, was the third count of Flanders.
Arnulf was the son of count Baldwin II of Flanders and Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great. He was named after his distant ancestor, Saint Arnulf of Metz; this was intended to emphasize his family's descent from the Carolingian dynasty.
Arnulf greatly expanded Flemish rule to the south, taking all or part of Artois, Ponthieu, Amiens, and Ostravent. He exploited the conflicts between Charles the Simple and Robert I of France, and later those between Louis IV and his barons.
In his southern expansion Arnulf inevitably had conflict with the Normans, who were trying to secure their northern frontier. This led to the 943 murder of the Duke of Normandy, William Longsword, at the hands of Arnulf's men.
The Viking threat was receding during the later years of Arnulf's life, and he turned his attentions to the reform of the Flemish government.
In 934 he married Adele of Vermandois, daughter of Herbert II of Vermandois. Their children were:
-Luitgard, married Wichmann, Count of Hamaland
-Egbert, died 953
-Baldwin III of Flanders
-Elftrude, married Siegfried, Count of Guînes
He also had a previous daughter, Hildegard.
Arnulf made his eldest son and heir Baldwin III of Flanders co-ruler in 958, but Baldwin died untimely in 962, so Arnulf was succeeded by Baldwin's infant son, Arnulf II of Flanders.”«s87» 
Arnoul or Arnulf I “The Great” Count of Flanders (I12665)
 
202 “ARNOUL de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN III Joint Count of Flanders & his wife Mathilde Billung of Saxony ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Ghent). The Annales Elnonenses Minores records "Arnulfus, filius Balduini ex Matilde" succeeding his grandfather in 964 as ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, under the guardianship of his father's first cousin Baudouin Baldzo [de Boulogne] who made himself Comte de Courtrai. Taking advantage of the weakness of the county during Count Arnoul's minority, [his uncle] Dirk II Count of [Holland] captured Gent and Waas, and Lothaire King of the West Franks occupied the south-east ostensibly in the role of protector of the young count. To counter the perceived threat from France, Emperor Otto II established marches on the right bank of the river Schelde from Valenciennes in the south to Antwerp in the north. Arnoul's majority was declared in 976. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 989 of "Arnulfus marchysus, nepos magni Arnulfii".
m ([968][143]) as her first husband, ROZALA di Ivrea, daughter of BERENGARIO II ex-King of Italy [Ivrea] & his wife Willa of Tuscany-Arles ([950/960]-7 Feb or 13 Dec 1003, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regis Susannam". According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala di Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976 but the source on which this is based has not been located. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul. She was taken to Germany after her parents were captured by Emperor Otto I in 963, and brougght up at the imperial court. Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own control over the county. She married secondly (988 before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as his first wife, Robert Associate-King of France, who succeeded his father in 996 as Robert II King of France. She adopted the name SUZANNE on her second marriage, and was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the county of Flanders as her dowry. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baudouin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina"[149]. The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb".
Count Arnoul II & his wife had two children:
1. MATHILDE de Flandre (-24 Jul, 995 or before). "Susanna regina" donated property for the soul of "filia suæ Mathilda" by charter dated 995. It is not known whether Mathilde was older or younger than her brother Baudouin but the estimated birth date range of their mother suggests that Baudouin may have been her younger child. The Memorial of "Mathildis filia…Arnulfi viri" records her death "IX Kal Aug".
2. BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([980]-30 May 1035). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Barbatum" as son of "Arnulfus…et…Ruzelam quæ et Susanna". He succeeded his father in 987 as BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders, presumably under a regency considering his youth although the name of the regent has not yet been identified. Hugues Capet King of France recognised Baudouin's claim to all of Flanders, including the part previously taken by King Lothaire, and also arranged his mother's second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987. After Count Baudouin's mother returned to Flanders following her repudiation, France retained Montrreuil-sur-Mer which provoked Flanders into joining a rebellion against King Hugues. The result was the return of Artois and Ostrevant to Flanders, although Ponthieu remained with France. Count Baudouin established control over the northern part of the Ternois, including Thérouanne, Fauquembergues and Saint-Omer, previously under the suzerainty of the county of Boulogne. He captured the march of Valenciennes from Germany in 1006, but lost it the following year when Emperor Heinrich II invaded Flanders and captured Gent. Count Baudouin subsequently arranged an alliance with the emperor who, in 1012, helped him install a new bishop of Cambrai, enfeoffed him with the islands of Zeeland and, in 1015, with Valenciennes. The emperor, however, invaded Flanders again in 1020, supported this time by Robert King of France. Count Baudouin arranged the betrothal of his son to the French king's daughter to help restore good relations. His son rebelled against Baudouin after 1028. Count Baudouin was forced to take refuge in Normandy, where he married the duke's daughter and from where he returned to Flanders with reinforcements. His son submitted, but his father permitted him to rule jointly. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1035 of "Balduinus, gloriosus marchisus". The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the death in 1035 of "Balduinus comes filius Susannæ". m firstly ([1012]) OGIVE de Luxembourg, daughter of FRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau Vogt von Stablo [Wigeriche] & his wife --- heiress of Gleiberg [Konradiner] (-21 Feb or 9 Mar 1030, bur Gent St Peter). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Gisleberti comitis Odgivam" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum", the marriage presumably being arranged by Emperor Heinrich II as part of the alliance negotiated in 1012. Ogive is shown as daughter of Graf Friedrich in Europäische Stammtafeln. There is no reference to Friedrich's older brother Gislebert having married and had children. The chronology does not favour Ogive being the daughter of Giselbert, son of Friedrich. It is therefore assumed that the reference to "Gisleberti comitis" is an error, although the primary source has not yet been identified which confirms that Friedrich was Ogive's father. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1030 of "Odgiva comitissa". The Memorial of "Odgiva…Balduino domino" records her death "IX Mar". m secondly ([after 1030]) [ELEONORE] de Normandie, daughter of RICHARD II Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Rennes [Brittany]. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana refers to "filiam secundi Ricardi ducis Normannorum" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum" after the death of Ogiiva. The Annalista Saxo states that the mother of Judith was "cognatione beati Ethmundi regis", without naming her or giving a more precise origin. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Duke Richard and his wife Judith had three daughters, of whom the second (unnamed) married "Baudouin de Flandre". The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. Count Baudouin IV & his first wife had one child:
a) BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille St Pierre). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Insulanum" son of "Balduinum Barbatum [et] Odgivam". He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders.
Count Baudouin IV & his second wife had one child:
b) JUDITH de Flandre ([1033]-5 Mar 1094, bur St Martin Monastery). The Annalista Saxo names "Iudhita…amita Rodberti comitis de Flandria ex cognatione beati Ethmundi regis" as husband of "Haroldi" (in error for Tostig) but correctly names her second husband "Welphus filius Azzonis marchionis Italorum". The Genealogia Welforum names "filiam comitis Flandrie, reginam Anglie, Iuditam nomine" as wife of Welf. Florence of Worcester says that Judith was "daughter of Baldwin Count of Flandders" but does not specify which Count Baldwin, nor is this clear from the context. According to the Vita Ædwardi Regis, Judith was the sister of Count Baudouin V. On the other hand, Alberic de Trois Fontaines asserts that Judith was one of the children of Baudouin V Count of Flanders and his wife Adela de France, but there are other clear errors in Alberic's listing of this couple's children so the statement should be viewed with caution. Judith is also listed as the daughter of Coount Baudouin V (after Mathilde) in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also shows her first marriage. Judith moved to Denmark after her first husband was killed. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death "109094 IV Non Mar" of "Iuditha uxor ducis Welfonis Baioariæ" and her burial "apud monasterium…Sancti Martini" built by her husband. The necrology of Raitenbuch records the death "III Non Mar" of "Iudinta regina Anglie, filia marchionis de Este uxor Welfonis nostri fundatoris", exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage and confusing her paternity. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "III Non Mar" of "Judita dux regina Anglie", also exaggerating her status resulting from her first marriage. m firstly (before Sep 1051) TOSTIG Godwinson, son of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha of Denmark ([1025/30]-killed in battle Stamford Bridge 25 Sep 1066). He was created Earl of Northumbria in 1055, but Northumbria rebelled against him in Oct 1065. m secondly ([1071]) as his second wife, WELF I Duke of Bavaria [Este], son of ALBERTO AZZO II Marchese d'Este & his first wife Kunigunde von Altdorf [Este] ([1030/40]-Paphos Cyprus 9 Nov 1101, bur Weingarten, near Lake Constance).”

From Wikipedia:
“Arnulf II of Flanders (960 or 961 – March 30, 988) was Count of Flanders from 965 until his death. He was the son of Baldwin III of Flanders and Matilda of Burgundy.
Baldwin III died in 962, when Arnulf was just an infant, and with Arnulf's grandfather count, Arnulf I, still alive. When Arnulf I died three years later (965), the regency was held by their kinsman Baldwin Balso.
By the time Arnulf attained his majority in 976, Flanders had lost some of the southern territory acquired by Arnulf I. The latter had given some parts of Picardy to King Lothar of France to help assure his grandson's succession, and gave Boulogne as a fief to another relative. Then early in Arnulf's minority Lothar had taken Ponthieu and given it to Hugh Capet, and the first counts of Guînes had established themselves.
He married Rozala of Lombardy, daughter of Berengar II of Italy, and was succeeded by their son, Baldwin IV.”«s87» 
Arnulf II Count of Flanders (I12660)
 
203 “ARNULF, son of LIUTPOLD Markgraf in Bavaria & his [first] wife --- ([875/85]-14 Jul 937, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Regino records that "filius suus [=Liutbaldus dux] Arnulfus" succeeded his father as dux in 907. The Salzburg Annals name "Liupoldus dux, pater Arnolfi ducis". His birth date range is estimated based on the likelihood that Arnulf must have been adult and established in his career when he was accepted as his father's successor in 907, but must be considered approximate. He referred to himself in 908 as ARNULF Duke of Bavaria in a charter confirming an exchange of land between Drakolf Bishop of Freising and Konrad chor-bishop of Freising. "Chuonradus…rex" made donations by charter dated 5 Mar 912 with the consent of "fidelium nostrorum comitum vero Sigihardi, Arnolfi, Erchangarii, Odalrici, Perchtoldi, Chuonradi, Herimanni, Luitfredi atque Iringi", which shows not only that Arnulf was not titled "dux" in official national documents but also that he was considered second in importance among the nobility in the realm at that time, assuming that the order of the names is of significance. He had the power to distribute bishoprics in his territory, although the right passed to the king of Germany on his death. He was expelled from Bavaria by his stepfather Konrad I King of Germany in 915 but soon returned. A reaffirmation of his rule by the Bavarians in 919 is recorded in the 12th century copies of the Salzburg Annals, which implply that he may have been appointed to rule as king in a wider German context, presumably as a rival to Heinrich I King of Germany. He submitted to King Heinrich in 921. "Heinricus…rex" confirmed donations to Kloster Kempten by charter dated 330 Jun 929 at the request of "comitum Arnolfi et Heberhardi". This charter appears to refer to Arnulf and his son, although it is surprising that Arnulf is not referred to with the title "dux". The necrology of Fulda records the death in 937 of "Arnolt dux". The necrology of St Gall records the death "II Id Jul" of "Arnolfi ducis Baioariorum".
m ---. The name and origin of Duke Arnulf's wife are not known. Wegener speculates that she was --- of Friulia, daughter of Eberhard Duke of the March of Friulia [Unruochingi], ostensibly for onomastic reasons on the basis of the transmissioon of the names Eberhard and Judith into the family, used first for Duke Arnulf's children. This daughter is, however, not listed among the children of Duke Eberhard set out in the cartulary of Cysoing abbey, although she may be identical to onone of the unnamed daughters. From a chronological point of view, it is unlikely that the wife of Arnulf Duke of Bavaria was the daughter of Duke Eberhard. The latter's children must have been born between [840] and [860], whereas Duke Arnulf's children were probably born between [905] and [920].
Duke Arnulf & his wife had seven child:
1. EBERHARD ([905/10]-after 938). The Annales ex Annalibus Ivravensibus Antiquis records that "Longobardi" accepted "Eparhardum filium Arnolfi ducis" as their lord in 934 and that his father confirmed his succession in Bavaria in 935. His birth date range is based on the assumption that he was adult when accepted as his father's heir in 935. "Heinricus…rex" confirmed donations to Kloster Kempten by charter dated 30 Jun 929 at the request of "comitum Arnolfi et Heberhardi". This charter appears to refer to Arnulf and his son, although it is surprising that Arnulf is not referred to with the title "dux". He succeeded his father in 937 as EBERHARD Duke of Bavaria. Pope Leo VII addressed a letter dated 938 to "Eberhardo duci Bawariorum". After Duke Eberhard defied him in some way, Otto I King of Germany invaded Bavaria twice in 938, deposed Eberhard and forced him into exile after the second expedition.
2. ARNULF (-killed in battle near Regensburg 22 Jul 954). The Annales Sangallenses record that "Adalbert filius Perehctoldi et Arnolfus filius Arnolfi ducis" were killed in 954. He is named as son of Arnulf in 6 Feb 954. Pfalzgraf in Bavariria 947. He rebelled against Otto I King of Germany in 954, aiming to re-establish his family's position in Bavaria but was killed in the first siege of Regensburg. The necrology of churches of Freising records the death "XI Kal Aug" of "Arnolt com", which is assumed refers to Pfalzgraf Arnulf. m ---. The name of Arnulf's wife is not known. Arnulf & his wife had [two] children:
a) BERTHOLD von Reisensburg ([930]-after 21 Jul 976). The Annales Sancti Emmerammi record that "Perahtold filius Arnulphi" was expelled "de Norica" in 951. His birth date is estimated from his adult career starting in 951, but bearing in mind the likely birth date range of his father based on the estimated birth date of his oldest paternal uncle in [905/10]. The Vita S Oudalrici names "Perehtoldus, filius Arnulfi, de castello Risinesburc" when recording that he fought the Hungariaians in [Aug 955]. "Otto…imperator augustus" returned property "quod vocatur Metama" previously donated by "Peretoldus Arnoulfi filius" to Kloster Metten by charter dated 21 Jul 976 "per petiticionem Heinrici sanctæ Auguste civitatis episcopi et Liutpaldi marchionis". m ---. The name of Berthold's wife is not known. Berthold & his wife had [one possible] child:
i) [FRIEDRICH [I] "Roch" (-Jerusalem before 1020, bur Jerusalem). According to Wegener, Graf Friedrich [I] was the son of Berthold von Reisensburg. He bases this on "Berthold" witnessing several exchanges of property in the oberen Isar dated [990/99], and equating him with Berthold von Reisensburg. Several points can be made about this theory. Firstly, it seems surprising that such an illustrious connection with the Luitpoldinger Dukes of Bavaria would not have been mentioned by the various contemporary sources which relate the early history of the Grafen von Diessen. Secondly, the estimated birth date of Berthold von Reisensburg is restricted to the limited period [929/31], bearing in mind the known dates of his own career and the likely birth date of his father. His last known mention is dated 976. Another burst of activity fourteen years after this date, when he would have been in his sixties, would be surprising. Thirdly, judging from the 976 entry, Berthold von Reisensburg appears to have fallen into disgrace with Emperor Otto III. There is no record of his return to favour. It is therefore likely that his descendants (if any) fell into obscurity. Fourthly, it is surprising that Berthold von Reisensburg would not have been described as comes even in entries relating to the period after his disgrace, as he would presumably have continued to claim and use the title.
b) [daughter . The wife of Graf Meginhard is shown by Wegener as the daughter of Pfalzgraf Arnulf but he quotes no primary source to support this assertion. m MEGINHARD Graf an der Mangfall [Pilgrimiden], son of --- (-after 987, bur Benediktbeuern Monastery).]
3. HERMANN (-954 or after). The Vita S Oudalrici names "Heremannum fratrem Arnolfi" when recording that he was captured in 954 when returning from Ulrich Bishop of Augsburg.
4. HEINRICH . "Otto…rex" donated property "in loco Crapofelt [in regno Carentino]" previously inherited by "Heinricus Arnolfi filius" to Salzburg church at the request of "fratris nostri…Heinrici" by charter dated 10 Dec 953.
5. JUDITH ([915/25][194]-29 Jun after 974). The wife of "Henrici ducis, fratris primi Ottonis" is called "filia Arnoldi ducis quondam Bawariæ", but not named, in the Annalista Saxo. Widukind records the marriage of "filia ducis Arnulfi" to "dominus Heinricus". The mother of the wife of "Purchardo duce Alamannorum" was "filiam materteræ" of "Heinricus filius Purchardi comitis" who was installed as Bishop of Augsburg in 973, according to the Vita Oudalrici. After the death of her husband, she was suspected of a relationship with Abraham Bishop of Freising but was exonerated by the Bishop, who sang the mass at her burial. "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "salinam…Hal…in pago Salzburggeuue et in comitatu Uuillihelmmi comitis" to "domnæ Iuditæ fratris nostri beatæ memoriæ Heinrici ducis viduæ" by charter dated 27 Apr 973. She was imprisoned when her son rebelled in [974/75], and obliged to enter the convent of Niedermünster at Regensburg. The necrology of the Lower Monastery in Regensburg records the death "III Kal Jul" of "Ievta ducissa fundatrix inferioris monasterii". The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "III Kal Jul" of "Judita vidualis nonna". m ([937/40]) HEINRICH, son of HEINRICH I King of Germany & his second wife Mathilde [Immedinger] ([Dec 919/22 Apr 922]-Regensburg 1 Nov 955, bur Regensburg St Emmeran). Duke of Lotharingia [940]. He was installed as HEINRICH I Duke of Bavaria in 947 by his older brother. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "Kal Nov" of "Heinricus dux Baioaria hic sepultus".
6. LUDWIG . Judith Duchess of Bavaria donated property held by her brother Ludwig until his death to St Emmeran dated [972/74].
7. daughter . The origin of the wife of Graf Burkhard, mother of Heinrich Bishop of Augsburg, is confirmed by the Vita Oudalrici recording that the wife of "Purchardo duce Alamannorum" was "filiam materteræ [Heinrici episcopi]", the wife of Burkhard III Duke of Swabia being Hedwig of Bavaria, daughter of Heinrich I Duke of Bavaria & his wife Judith of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger]. m BURKHARD, Graf. 947/55. Graf Burkhard & his wife had one child:
a) HEINRICH (-killed in battle near Cotrone 13 Jul 982). "Heinricus filius Purchardi comitis" was installed as Bishop of Augsburg in 973 in succession to Ulrich [von Dillingen], according to the Vita Oudalrici which also specifies that the wife of "Purchardo duce Alamannorum" was "filiam materteræ". He rebelled against King Otto in [976/77], together with his cousin Heinrich Duke of Carinthia and Heinrich Duke of Bavaria [Ottonen]. The rebels were captured at Passau in 978 by the king's forces, deposed and banished. He was killed in battle against a Byzantine/Muslim alliance near Stilo in Calabria during the Italian campaign of King Otto II.”«s87» 
Arnulf Duke of Bavaria (I13936)
 
204 “ARTAUD [II], son of GERAUD & his wife Gimburgis --- (-[993 or 999] or [11 Oct 1000]). "Artaldus comes, Gerardi quondam nobilis viri et Gimbergiæ filius" donated property "in pago Lugdunensi in ago Cegniacensi…in villa Toriniaco" to Savigny bby charter dated 994, subscribed by "Artaldi comitis et uxoris eius Theodebergiæ". "Artaldus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated Apr 995. It is possible that the Seigneurs de Beaujeu had some family relationship with the Comtes dde Lyon et de Forez. Samuel Guichenon, in his Histoire de la Souverainté de Dombes written in 1662, cites earlier secondary sources which quote an epitaph (disappeared by the date of Guichenon's work) which records the death in "the year 99" of "Artaudus comes Lugdunensis et comes Forensis et dominus Bellijoci et Umfredus frater eius et mater eorum qui obiit anno 99". Guichenon cites another version of the epitaph, from "une ancienne généalogie manuscrite" which he found in the archives of the "chapitre de Saint-Jean de Lyon", which reads "Artaudus comes Lugdunensis ac Forensis, dominus Bellijoci, anno 999" and "Artaldus filius et mater eius". The editor of the 1874 edition of Guichenon records yet another version, from "la chronique trouvée à Belleville" which reads "…Artaldus comes Lugd. et Forensis dns Stephanus comes frater eius et Amphredus Bellijoci dns et pater et frater eorum, obiit dictus Artaldus 993". Guichenon's conclusion is that none of these versions is likely to be genuine, based on his supposition that pre-1000 epitaphs are infrequent and that those which exist record only names and titles not the territories ruled. Paradin notes that “deux escussons des armoiries de Forez et Beaujolais” were on the epitaph. Auguste Bernard confirms that the inscription could not therefore have been contemporary as such arms did not exist in the 10th century.
m as her first husband, TEUTBERGA, daughter of --- (-9 Jun ----, after 13 Apr 1013). Her marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 994 under which "Artaldus comes, Gerardi quondam nobilis viri et Gimbergiæ filius" donated property to Savignyy, subscribed by "Artaldi comitis et uxoris eius Theodebergiæ". She married secondly ([1001/08], repudiated) as his second wife, Pons Comte de Gévaudan et de Forez (-[26 Feb 1011/1016]), who was murdered by his stepson, Artaud Comte de Forez, in revenge for the repudiation of his mother, Pons's second wife. "Tedberga comitissa" donated property to Cluny for the souls of "senioris mei Artaldi et filiorum meorum Artaldi et Giraldi" by charter dated Mar 1010. It is noted in the compilalation that the document was subscribed by "Artaldi senioris eius, Artaldi filii eius, Giraldi filii eius" but that these subscriptions are only found in the cartulary version, the subscribers being unrecorded in the original charter[241]. There is clearly a mismatch between these signatories and the date of death of Artaud [II], assuming that both his death date and the date of the charter are correct. The 13th century obituary of the Eglise primatiale de Lyon records the death "V Id Jun" of "Tyeburga comitissa que dedit Sancto Stephano duos anaphos argenteos et unam fibulam auream cum preciosissimis gemmis". "Theuterga…comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Ainay for the soul of "senioris mei Artbaldi" by charter dated 13 Apr 1012, subscribed by "Rothildis filie sue".
Artaud [II] & his wife had three children:
1. ARTAUD [III] (-[11 Feb] ---- or [24 Mar] ----, before [1017]). "Girardus comes" donated property "in pago Lugdunensi in ago Tarnantensi in finibus villæ…Conziacus" to Savigny for the souls of "patris mei Artaldi et matris meæ Theotbergiæ et fratris mei Artaldi" by charter dated [1017]. The 13th century obituary of the Eglise primatiale de Lyon records the death "III Id Feb" of "Artaldus comes, qui dedit Sancto Stephano…Flescanges villam" and the death "IX Kal Apr" of "Artaldus vicecomes qui dedit Lucennacum Sancto Stephano", although it is not known to which Artaud these entries refer. The necrology of Savigny also records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Arthaudus comes Forensis qui…dedit prioratum de Arnaco…".
2.GERAUD (-[5 Mar] after 1046). "Girardus comes" donated property "in pago Lugdunensi in ago Tarnantensi in finibus villæ…Conziacus" to Savigny for the souls of "patris mei Artaldi et matris meæ Theotbergiæ et fratris mei Artaldi" by charter dated [1017]. Radulfus Glaber records that “Geraldus comes” attempted to impose “suum filium puerulum” (unnamed) as archbishop of Lyon after the death of archbishop Burchard in 1033. "Girardi comitis" witnessed a charter dated 1046 under which "Gauzerannus" donated property "ecclesiam Sancti Joannis Baptistæ de Tarnanto…et ecclesiam Sancti Victorie…in pago Lugdunensi" to the abbey of Savigny. The 13th century obituary of the Eglise primatiale de Lyon records the death "III Non" of "GeGeraldus comes". m ADELAIDE, daughter of ---. Auguste Bernard quotes a charter dated “VIII Id Feb Regis Rodulpho regnante” under which Gérard donated the church of Saint-Pierre d´Aurec to the abbey of La Cluse which names his wife “Adalaix” and his sons Artaud and “Gauffredus seu Vuilelmus”. According to Auguste Bernard, she was Adelaide, daughter of Pons de Gévaudun & [his first wife ---], but he does not cite the source on which this is based. Géraud & his wife had five children.
3. ROTHILDIS (-after 13 Apr 1012). "Theuterga…comitissa" donated property to the abbey of Ainay for the soul of "senioris mei Artbaldi" by charter dated 13 Apr 1012, subscribed by "Rothildis filie sue".”«s87» 
Artaud II (I14341)
 
205 “ARTAUD [IV] de Forez, son of GERAUD Comte de Forez & his wife Adelaide --- (-[14 May 1078/6 Dec 1079]). Auguste Bernard quotes a charter dated “VIII Id Feb Regis Rodulpho regnante” under which Gérard donated the church of Saint-Pierre d´Aurec to the abbey of La Cluse which names his wife “Adalaix” and his sons Artaud and “Gauffredus seu Vuilelmus”. Comte de Forez. Auguste Bernard cites a charter dated to before 1061 under which Artaud, son of Gérard, confirmed a donation to the cchurch of Aurec, approved by his (unnamed) wife. Pope Gregory VII excommunicated Comte Artaud at the council of Worms in 1076 for his attacks on the church of Lyon. "Vuillelmus comes Foresii" donated property to Savigny by charter dated [14 May 1078] which names "comes Artaldus pater eius".
m RAYMONDE, daughter of ---. "Raymode matre mea" consented to the donation to Cluny dated 1078 by "Artaldus comes Forensis", named immediately after "Willelmus filius eius [Artaldi]".
Artaud [II] & his wife had two children:
1. GUILLAUME [I] (-killed in battle Nikaia Jun 1097). "Vuillelmus comes Foresii" donated property to Savigny by charter dated [14 May 1078] which names "comes Artaldus pater eius". "Vuillelmi comitis filii Artaldi" subscribed a charter dateted 6 Dec 1079 under which "Falco de Yconio" donated property to Savigny in praise of "Artaldi Forisiensis comitis". Comte de Forez. "Willelmus filius eius" consented to the donation to Cluny dated 1078 by "Artaldus comes Forensis". William of Tyre names “Guillelmus comes de Foreis” among those who left on the First Crusade in 1096 with Robert Count of Flanders. William of Tyre names “Willelmus comes de Foreis” among those killed during the siege of Nikaia[268]. m WANDALMODIS de Beaujeu, daughter of GUICHARD [II] Sire de Beaujeu & his wife Richoara [de Salernay]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Guillaume [I] & his wife had two children:
a) GUILLAUME [II] (-after 1107). Auguste Bernard quotes a charter which confirmed the foundation of l´hôpital de Montbrison and names Guillaume and Eustache during the lifetime of their father Guillaume. The primary source which confirms his pparentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Forez. Auguste Bernard cites a charter dated 1107 issued by Comte Guillaume. He became a Carthusian monk. He was assassinated by Gauceran vicomte de Lavieu who accused Guillaume of having raped his wife.
b) EUSTACHE (-[1117]). Auguste Bernard quotes a charter which confirmed the foundation of l´hôpital de Montbrison and names Guillaume and Eustache during the lifetime of their father Guillaume. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Comte de Forez. Auguste Bernard cites a charter under which Eustache granted the château de Saint-Trivier to the seigneur de Beaujeu.
2. ITA RAYMONDE . The Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum records that "Guillelmus…[filios]…Renaldum" married firstly "filiam unicam [Artaldi] comitis Foratensis". The primary source which confirms her name and second marriage has not yet been identified. According to Auguste Bernard, the marriage is proved by charters published by De La Mure. m firstly (divorced 1075 or before) as his first wife, RENAUD [II] Comte de Nevers, son of GUILLAUME I Comte de Nevers & his wife Ermengarde Ctss de Tonnerre (-5 Aug 1089). m secondly (1075) GUIGUES RAYMOND d'Albon, son of GUIGUES [II] "Vetus" Comte d'Albon & his second wife Ines de Barcelona ([1074/75]-5 Dec after 1096).”«s87» 
Artaud IV Comte de Lyon et de Forez (I14089)
 
206 “ASCELIN Goël . The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “primus Ascelinus cognominatus Goellus, secundus Wiltinus…[miles], tertius Roberti clericali ordine” as the three children of “Roberto Ibriensi” and his wife “Hildiburgis”. "Primus Ascelinus cognomento Goellus, secundus Willelms…milites…tertius Robertus clericus" are named as the three sons of "Roberto Ibriensi" & his wife under their mother's charter donating property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Goël de Breherval" seized the castle of Ivry-la-Bataille (Eure) from Guillaume de Breteuil and surrendered it to Robert III Duke of Normandy. The resulting war with Guillaume ended with the latter's capture and agreement to Ascelin's marriage to his daughter. m ISABEL de Breteuil, illegitimate daughter of GUILLAUME de Breteuil & his mistress ---. The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Elisabeth” as wife of “Goellus”. The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus". She was the daughter of Guillaume according to Orderic Vitalis. She must have been illegitimate as the chronicler says in another passage that her father's marriage was childless. "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116]. Ascelin & his wife had [five or more] children:
(a) ROBERT d'Ivry (-after 1118). The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth”. The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus". "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suaam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116]. "Robert son of Ascelin Goël" joined the rebellion against Henry I King of England in 1118, but rejoined the king who committed the castle of Ivry to him to guarantee his loyalty. m ---, daughter of ---. Raoul "le Rouge" de Pont-Echanfray was brother-in-law of Robert Goël, according to Orderic Vitalis.
(b) GUILLAUME "Lovel" d'Ivry (-after 1153). The Vita Dominæ Hildeburgis names “Robertus et Wiltinus” as sons of “Goellus” and his wife “Elisabeth”. The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise (see above) names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus". "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise with the consent of "Goellus…uxoremque suam Isabel filiosque suos Willelmum atque Robertum" by charter dated [1116]. Son of Ascelin according to Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he inherited the castle of Ivry after the death of his brother Robert and records his marriage. He rebelled against Henry I King of England in Sep 1123, with his brothers-in-law Waléran de Meulan, Hugues de Montfort and Hugues de Châteauneuf. Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Asccelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153. m ([1120]) MATHILDE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Beaumont-le-Roger Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet]. Orderic Vitalis records Waleran Comte de Meulan having three sisters (whom he does not name), one of whom he married to "Guillaume Lovel son of Ascelin". The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.
(c) brothers . Orderic Vitalis records that they were given as hostages to Henry I King of England to guarantee the good conduct of their brother Robert.
(d) ROGER "Balbosus" (-after 1153). Robert of Torigny records "discordia inter Symonem comitem Ebroicensem" and "filios Ascelini Goelli, scilicet et Willermum Lupellum et Rogerium Balbosum" in 1153.
Ascelin had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress:
(e) ROBERT (-after [1116]). "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise.
(f) [GAUTHIER (-after [1116]). "Roberti Bastardi Rufi filii eiusdem Goelli, Gauterii de Sparnone fratris eiusdem Roberti" subscribed the charter dated [1116] under which "Hildeburgis mater Goelli de Ibriaco" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise. It is assumed that Gauthier was also the son of Ascelin Goël, although the wording of this charter does not exclude the possibility that he was the uterine brother of Robert.]”


Lists name as “Ascelin Goel D’IVRY Seigneiur d’Ivry” born before 1066 in Breval, Yvelines, Ile-d-France, France and dying between 1116 and 1119, Ivry-La-Bataille, Eure, Normandy, France.

Allegedly left seven sons and a daughter who married Radulfus Rufus, a Norman nobleman. Three of the sons have been identified: Robert, William, and John de Perceval.

“Ascelin, his father’s eldest son and heir, being a fierce warrior, obtained the name of Lupus, or the wolf; besides the possessions of his father in Normandy, he succeeded to several manors in Somersetshire, which were fortified by the Englishh, and allotted to the officers and friends of the Conqueror. Harptree, Easton, Weston in Gordano, Stawell, and Badcombe, were among those which fell to the shore of Ascelin Gouel de Perceval, of Cary. He married, by a compact made according tto the custom of those times, after a successful attack upon the Earl of Bretteville, her father, Isabel de Bretteville, and by her had several sons; Robert, who succeeded his father as Lord of Yvery, &c., in Normandy; John, the youngest son, whho received the manors of Farringdon and Harptree, and was ancester of the Barons of Harptree Gournay; and William Gouel de Perceval, the second son, who, by the death of his brother Robert in 1121, obtained the honours and estates of the family, both in England and Normandy. And here we may remark a curious instance of the capricious origin of surnames in those distant times. Ascelin de Perceval having been, from his fierce disposition, surnamed Lupus, the wolf, William de Gouel, his son, was called Lupellus, or the young wolf. Hence his children in this kingdom, dropping the name of Perceval, assumed that of Lupellus, Anglice Lupell, and Lovell; and transmitted the same as the name of two great families of the ancient peerage of Great Britain.”

“Ascelin, sometimes called (by the same historian), Ascelin Gouel, Gouel de Breherval, Gouel de Percheval, and Gouel de Yvery, was also surnamed Lupus, or the Wolf, from the violence of his temper and actions, and accompanied his father in the Norman invasion, being mentioned in some accounts of the principal commanders, by the name of Perceval, in others by that of Ascelin, or Azeline, alone. By which last he is recorded in Doomsday book, wherein the manors of Weston in Gordano, West-Harpetree, Stawel, and other estates in the county of Somerset; Tichmarch, in the county of Northampton, &c. appear to have been allotted to him, besides those beforementioned, held at the time of the said survey by his father. In the year 1087, he commanded the Norman forces at the siege of Mante, under William the Conqueror, who there received the hurt of which he died.
After the decease of that Prince, William Rufus, his second son, obtaining the crown of England, Robert, the elder, was obliged to content himself with Normandy alone, whose government being weak to the last degree, every subject acted as an indndependent sovereign upon his own estate, whereby that duchy became one continued scene of violence and rapine. During which unhappy state, in the year 1090, William, the youngest brother of this Ascelin, having ravished a woman at Pacey, a town belonging to William, Earl of Bretevil, Pacy, Constantine, and Yvery, brother to the Earl of Hereford, in England; and the said Earl endeavouring to revenge the injury, Ascelin Gouel de Perceval, then in Normandy, took his brother under his protection, and began hostilities against the Earl, by seizure of the castle of Yvery (which the Duke, Robert, had not long before weakly granted to the said Earl of Bretevil, so that the said Ascelin no longer held it under the Duke, but under ththe said Earl), and to engage the Duke to entertain a good opinion of his proceedings, delivered up to him the said castle, which (having repented of his former concession of it to the Earl), he earnestly desired to get into his hands again. Yet so imprudent (as the historian observes), was the said Duke Robert, that neither reflecting upon the folly of parting a second time with so strong a place to the Earl, or upon the consequences of the resentment of Ascelin, at this treatment, he soon after restored the castle of Yvery to the Earl of Bretevil, for the sum of 1500l.
The said Earl thus repossessed of this castle, and Ascelin being deprived by him of his command thereof, a long and terrible war in Normandy ensued thereon. For the said Ascelin, having fortified and garrisoned his castle of Breherval, collecting his friends, relations, and dependants, and calling in to his assistance some of the family of Philip, King of France, and associating with Richard de Montfort, nephew to the Earl of Evreux, and son to Almeric, who had been lately killed by the Earl of Bretevil, took the field with great forces against him and his adherents.
The Earl on his part raised a great power, with which giving battle to Ascelin, in February 1090, the 3d of William Rufus, he was in the very first engagement utterly defeated, with great slaughter of his men; and himself being taken prisoner with Roger de Glotis, and many other persons of note, was confined by the said Ascelin in the castle of Breherval for three whole months, treated there with the utmost severity, and exposed at the upper windows of that fortress, in the depth of wwinter, to the frost, in his shirt (which was purposely dipped in water), till it was frozen on his back. And the power and resolution of Ascelin was so great, and the weakness of the government so correspondent with it, that the Earl, having nno other hopes of being relieved from his distress, was compelled to submit to the terms prescribed by his enemy, obliging him to pay three thousand dreux pounds for his ransom, with a mighty quantity of arms and horses; to resign the possession of the castle of Yvery; and, what was still more galling than all the rest, to give his only daughter in marriage to the said Ascelin. All which articles being fully performed, the Earl obtained his freedom.
Yet, notwithstanding this alliance, the Earl of Bretevil, unable to forgive the injuries he had received, in the year 1091 raised fresh forces to renew the war; and having fortified the monastery of St. Mary, near Yvery, which he intended for hihis principal place of arms, placed a strong garrison therein. But Ascelin suddenly gathering together a considerable body of troops, set down before that strong hold, in which the Earl then lay, about the middle of Summer, and pressed the siege thereof with so much vigour, that he soon became master of the place, burned the monastery to the ground, and took many prisoners; among whom were William de Alis, Ernold, the sone of Popeline, and eight other knights, the Earl himself escaping with great difficulty.
This war continued for three years successively, and so much to the disadvantage of the Earl, that by the devastations of his lands, the loss of his men, and the ransom of his prisoners, he was in a manner ruined. At length, in the year 1094, hhe called in Philip, King of France, to his aid, and agreed to pay him seven hundred pounds for that service. He found means also to procure the assistance of divers other great men of that time, by promises of great rewards, and even at length prevailed on the supine Duke Robert to engage in his quarrel. The clergy concurring also against this formidable enemy, who had given them much offence, by his little reverence to them and their religious houses.
In consequence of these different negociations, the confederates assembled their troops in the Lent of the following year, 1095; and Philip, King of France, Robert, Duke of Normandy, many great Lords and Knights, all the militia of the duchy, alll the forces the church could raise, with all who held by military tenure of the abbies there, under the personal command of each respective parish priest and abbot, sat down before the castle of Breherval, to which Ascelin Gouel de Perceval had retired, unable to keep the field against so vast a power.
The troops who formed this siege were moreover provided in an extraordinary manner for it. Robert de Belesme, a very expert officer, and an inveterate enemy to this Ascelin, had the principal direction, and the artillery or engines were the samme which had been employed not long before at the siege of Jerusalem, invented about that time by a famous engineer in the expediion to the Holy Land, and esteemed the most terrible that had ever been till then used in war. These, being brought in service against this castle, ruined the walls and outworks of the place, destroyed the houses of the inhabitants, and cruelly annoyed the garrison. Yet Ascelin had put himself into such a condition of defence, and sustained his men with such courage, that he resisted all the attempts of the confederates for two whole months. And, till wearied with the length of the siege, the prospect of its much longer continuance, the expense of money and loss of men before the place, they offered and concluded a treaty between Ascelin and the Earl, whereby Ascelin was to keep his castle of Breherval, and to remain in every respect as he stood before, this single condition excepted in favour of the Earl, that he should be restored and left quiet in possession of the castle of Yvery aforesaid. Which castle, however, returned again, not many years after, to the said Ascelin Gouel de Perceval, and his descendants, in right of his wife.
The next mention of this Ascelin, is in the year 1102, the second of King Henry I., when, after the death of the Earl of Bretevil, beforementioned, William de Guader, Rainhold de Craceio, his nephews, and Eustace, his natural son (brother to Isabella, wife to this Ascelin), each claimed his succession; but William de Guader dying soon after, the competitors were reduced to two; viz, Rainhold de Craceio, and Eustace. William Alis, Radulfus Rufus, son-in-law to Ascelin, and Tedbald, supported the latter; but Ascelin Gouel, Almeric de Montfort, and Ralph de Conchis, supporting the other party, Eustace was obliged to fly from Normandy, to demand the protection and support of Henry I., then King of England.
The King received him graciously, and gave him Julian, his natural daughter, in marriage, promising to maintain him powerfully against Ascelin Gouel, and all his opponents; and accordingly, in the next year, 1103, the Earl of Mellent was sent into Normandy to support Eustace in his possessions, and to quiet the disorders there; but Rainold and Ascelin gave the Earl much resistance. And Ascelin Gouel having taken the son of Stephen de Mellent prisoner, confined him in a dungeon near foour whole months; nor could the Earl by any means deliver him, ex ore Lupi, from the jaws of the Wolf, as Ascelin is here styled, till Rainold de Craceio being killed, the Earl of Mellent (who is recorded to have been as well among the wisest, aas most potent of the great men in that age, and highly commended for his art and conduct in this particular transaction), concluded a peace in which Ascelin Gouel de Perceval, Earl Eustace, William Earl of Evreux, Almeric, and many other leaders on both sides in that war, were comprehended.
In the 13th of the same reign, 1113, King Henry going over to visit his Norman dominions, confirmed all the donations to the abbey of Utique, by a new charter, to which many of the great men subscribed, and among the rest, Gouel de Yvery, who was evidently the same person with this Ascelin.
In the 19th of Henry I. 1119, Eustace, before-mentioned, then Earl of Pacey, Bretevil, Constantine, and Yvery, which had been yielded to him upon the peace before-mentioned, being jealous that the King intended to deprive him of his castle of Yvery, rebelled, and fortified his other castles of Lira, Glotz, Pont St. Pierre, and Pacey, and sent his wife, Julian, to defend the castle of Bretevil against the King, her father. The King soon followed, and attacked the place with so much vigigour, as obliged her to surrender, though not till she had atempted to kill him with her own hands, at a conference to which she had treacherously invited him. Provoked at this unnatural attempt, he ordered her to be thrown from the castle wall into the ditch, from whence she escaped to her husband; at Pacey, which castle he was suffered to maintain as long as he lived, but forfeited the rest of his estates; of which the King granted part to Ralph de Guader, son to William, one of the competitors before-mentioned. But the castle and Earldom of Yvery were given to Ascelin Gouel de Perceval, and his children, who had pretensions to share of that inheritance by his wife, Isabella, sister of Earl Eustace, and daughter of the late Earl of Bretevil.
Among the religious acts of this Ascelin, it is recorded, that he joined with his father, Robert, in the grant to the monks of Utique, before-mentioned; and afterwards, that he gave all his lands in Villariis Vistatis, and the tythe of Montinney, to the said church, and confirmed this by his charter, to which his wife and sons also signed, at his castle of Bretevil. In consideration whereof, and from the charity of the monks, as it is expressed, he received sixty shillings. He also granted at Helery, to the monks of St. Ebrulf, free passage in that place, and in all his other lands; and departed this life in the 19th of Henry I. 1119.”«s60», «s68», «s75», «s87» 
Ascelin Goël Seigneur d’Ivry & Breval (I10605)
 
207 “Astrid ORMSDATTER Lydvo(925) (767) was born about 1450 in Lydvo gård #37, Voss, Hordaland, Norway. She died after 1521 in Ryfylke, Rogaland, Norway. After her husband's execution in 1521, half of Astrid's joint property was forfeited to the Crown. This included 496 lodd of silver and a great deal of household goods (pewter dishes, linen, chests, clothing, etc), food and farm animals.”

“Mandrup D. Hjeltnæs skriver i boken "Sogneprest Anders Andersen Ribers Stamtavle med Anhanget Galtungs families Slægttavle og Ribers Kaldsbrev (Hardanger, 1885)" at Gyrid Baarsdatter var gift med en - Men det synes at være en forveksling med Gyrid Baardsdatters datterdatter, hustru Gyrid (Galte) på Lydvo der skal være blevet gift med en Arnbjørn Gran”«s45», «s51» 
ORMSDTR PÅ LYDVO, Astrid (I9351)
 
208 “ASULF Skulesson of Rein . Snorre names "Asolf of Reine" as the son of Skule & his wife[220]. Morkinskinna names “Ásólfr, the father of Guthormr at Rein” as the son of “Skúli, the son of Jarl Tostig Godwinson”. m THORA Skoptisdotter, daughter of SKOPTI Ogmundsson of Giske & his wife ---. Snorre names "Thora, a daughter of Skopte Ogmundson" as the wife of "Asolf of Reine".
a) GUTTORM Asulfsson of Rein . Snorre names "Guthorm of Reine" as the son of "Asolf of Reine" & his wife. Morkinskinna names “Ásólfr, the father of Guthormr at Rein” as the son of “Skúli, the son of Jarl Tostig Godwinson”.
b) SIGRID . m HALLKEL Huk. Halkel & his wife had two children:
i) JON Halkelsson . m ([1155]) MARGARETA Haraldsdatter, illegitimate daughter of HARALD "Gille" King of Norway & his mistress ---. Snorre names "Harald Gille's third daughter…Margaret who was married to Jon Halkelson, a brother of Simon". Jon & his wife had one child:
(a) HALLKEL Jonsson (-killed in battle Florevåg near Bergen 3 Apr 1194). From Blindheim Jarl in Norway. m (after 19 Jun 1179) as her second husband, RAGNHILD Erlingsdatter, widow of JON Thorbergsson, daughter of ERLING Ormsen Skakke & his wife Kristin of Norway . The Saga of King Sverre records the marriage of "Ragnhild daughter of Earl Erling and Kristin Kings-daughter" and "Halkel son of Jon Hallkelsson". Hallkel & his wife had one child:
(1) RAGNVALD Hallkelsson (-murdered Husvik near Drøbak 1217, bur Oslo). Stormann of the Bagler in Norway.
ii) SIMON Skalp (-killed in battle 1161). Snorre names "Simon Skalp, a son of Halkel Huk" when recording his marriage. m ([1155]) MARIA Haraldsdatter, illegitimate daughter of HARALD "Gille" King of Norway & his mistress ---. Snorre names "Harald Gille's second daughter…Maria who was married to Simon Skalp, a son of Halkel Huk". Simon & his wife had one child:
(a) NIKOLAS . Snorre names Nikolas as son of "Simon Skalp, a son of Halkel Huk" & his wife. Snorre records that "Simon Skalp's son, the son of a daughter of King Harald Gille" was proposed as king in 1161.”«s87» 
SKULESSON, Asulf (I13675)
 
209 “At the age of sixteen Silas went to Farmington and worked for his Uncle Benjamin Lowell in his wagon shop. After a number of years he went to New Portland and set up his own shop and a blacksmith shop. It was said ‘Sile Burbank done the job it was right.’ At age 80 he repaired and painted his buildings on the home farm so that they might be in order at his death.”«s17» BURBANK, Silas Niles (I5630)
 
210 “ATENOLF . The Chronicon Comitum Capuæ records that "Athnulph germano suo, Ingulph et Vadipert et Gudo de Suessia, nepotibus suis" were killed fighting in Calabria with "Landulph Audax filius Capiferreu". m ---. The name of Atenolf's wife has not so far been identified. Atenolf & his wife had three children:
a) GISULF . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not so far been identified. Conte di Teano.
b) LANDO . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not so far been identified. Conte di Teano.
c) PANDOLF (-1026). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not so far been identified.”«s87» 
Atenolf (I15193)
 
211 “ATENOLF, son of LANDENULF of Capua & his wife --- (-912). The primary source which confirms Atenolf's parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded his brother [after 887] as ATENOLF I Count of Capua. In Jan 900, he deposed Radelchis Prince of Benevento "cognatus eius" and seized the Beneventan throne, after which Benevento was united with Capua. He adopted the title "Langobardorum gentis princeps". According to the "Catalogus Principum Capuæ", "Atenulfus magnus…de comite factus est princeps". The Annales Beneventani record the death of Count Atenolf in 912.
m ---. The name of Atenolf's wife has not so far been identified.
Atenolf & his wife had two children:
1. LANDOLF (-943). According to the "Catalogus Principum Capuæ", "Landulfus I eius filius" ruled jointly with his father and, after his father's death, jointly with his brother Atenulf II. Landolf visited Constantinople to seek military help in Capua's struggle against the Arabs and was invested as patricius. According to the Annales Beneventani, "Landulphus filius Atenolfi" was installed as Prince of Benevento in 902, but the extent to which he may have governed Benevento separatelely from Capua is unclear. He succeeded his father in 912 as LANDOLF III joint Prince of Capua, jointly with "Atenulfo germano suo et filii eorum". He participated in the joint Capuan, Beneventan and Salernitan expedition which removed the Araab settlement from the mouth of the River Garigliano in 915. He and his brother invaded Byzantine Apulia in [921], captured the castrum of Ascoli and killed the Byzantine strategos. On the accession of the minor Gisolf I Duke of Salerno in 946, Prince Landolf prepared to invade Salerno together with Ioannes III Duke of Naples, but they were repulsed by the Salernitans with support from Amalfi. The Chonicon Monasterii Beneventani records the death in 941 of "Atenolphus frater Domni LLandulfi" and in 943 of "Landulphus Antipater frater eius". m ([897/98]) GEMMA of Naples, daughter of ATHANASIUS Duke of Naples & his wife ---. The primary source which records her parentage and marriage has not so far been identified. Prince Landolf & his wife had three children:
a) ATENOLF (-943). According to the "Catalogus Principum Capuæ", "Atenulfus III et Landulfus II, filii Landulfi" ruled jointly with their father. The Annales Beneventani record that "Atenolfus princeps iunior" entered Sipontum in 936. He succeeded his father in 943 as ATENOLF III Prince of Capua. His succession and death are not referred to in the Annales Beneventani.
b) LANDOLF (-961). According to the "Catalogus Principum Capuæ", "Atenulfus III et Landulfus II, filii Landulfi" ruled jointly with their father. He succeeded his brother in 943 as LANDOLF IV Prince of Capua.
c) [son . The marriage of "filiam Guaimarii principis senioris Landolfo suo filio" is mentioned in the Chronicon Salernitanum. She may be "sua filia [=Guaimarius] Rothilda" named in the Chronicon Salernitanum. It is possible that this refers to one of the two known sons of Prince Landolf. m ([920/23]) --- of Salerno, daughter of GUAIMAR II Prince of Salerno & his first wife ---.]
2. ATENOLF (-941). "Atenulfo germano eius [=Landolfo]" succeeded his father in 912 as ATENOLF II joint Prince of Capua, jointly with "Landolfo… et filii eorum". The Chonicon Monasterii Beneventani records the death in 941 of "Atenolphus frater Domni Landulfi". m ---. The name of Atenolf's wife has not so far been identified. Atenolf & his wife had two children:
a) LANDOLF di Capua (-after 979). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He succeeded his father in 940 as LANDOLF Duke of Benevento. He was exiled by Pandolf I Prince of Capua and took refuge in Naples from where he appealed to his sister for shelter at Salerno. He was made gastald of Conza and his sons were given Salernitan territories. In 973, Duke Landolf captured Gisolf I Prince of Salerno and succeeded as LANDOLF Prince of Salerno, but Gisolf was restored soon after with the help of Pandolf I Prince of Capua.
b) GAITELGRIMA . The Chronicon Salernitanum names "Gaitelgrima Atenolfi principi Beneventi filia" but does not mention her marriage. "Gisolfus…Langobardorum gentis princeps" gave property at the request of "Gaitelgrime…matrix nostre" by charteer dated 950. As she is not named in later charters, it is possible that the donation was made around the time of her death. m ([920/23]) as his second wife, GUAIMAR II Duke of Salerno, son of GUAIMAR I Duke of Salerno & his wife Ita of Spoleto (-933).”«s87» 
Atenolf I Count of Capua (I15200)
 
212 “ATHANASIUS (-898). The primary source which records his parentage has not so far been identified. Bishop of Naples. Athanasius blinded his brother in 878 and assumed control as ATHANASIUS Duke of Naples. The Chronicon Ducum…Neapolis recordds that "Atanasius episcopus et dux" succeeded Duke Sergius (without specifying the relationship between the two) "11 anno 11 ind" and ruled 20 years, 3 months and 29 days. Pope John VIII committed 1400 mancusis to help the coup[521], but in 879 he excommunicated Duke Athanasius due to frustration at the latter's failure to break contact with the Muslims. Byzantium provided Duke Athanasius with troops which he used to attack Capua. Devoted to Byzantine culture, he secured and preserved for posterity many Greek manuscripts.
(a) GEMMA . The primary source which records her parentage and marriage has not so far been identified. m ([897/98]) LANDOLF of Capua, son of ATENOLF I Count of Capua, Prince of Benevento & his wife ---. He succeeded his father in 910 as LANDOLF III Prince of Capua.“«s87» 
Athanasius Duke of Naples (I15201)
 
213 “ATHON . Châtelain de Châteaurenard. The Historia of Monk Aimon names "Atho filius cuiusdam Gastellarii de Castro-Rainardo" acquired "castrum Cortinaci", married "quondam nobilem dominam" by whom he had "Joscelinum de Cortinaco". m ---. The name of Athon's wife is not known. Athon & his wife had one child.”«s87» Athon Châtelain de Chateaurenard (I14236)
 
214 “AUBRY [I] de Mello . He predeceased his father. m as her first husband, ADELA [Aelis] de Bulles, daughter of HUGUES Comte de Dammartin & his wife Roharde de Bulles. She married secondly Lancelin [II] [de Beauvais]. Administrator of the county of Dammartin-en-Goële 1112-1116. Aubry [II] & his wife had one child.”«s87» Aubry I de Mello (I15579)
 
215 “AUDEBERT [I] de la Marche, son of BOSON [I] "le Vieux" Comte de la Marche & his wife Emma de Périgueux (-killed in battle Charroux 997, bur Charroux Monastery). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Marchiæ…filius Bernardi, qqui fuit Audeberti, qui fuit Bosonis, qui Sulpicii, qui fuit Godfredi primi comitis de Karrofo". The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bosonis vetuli de Marca" as father of "Helias Petragoricensi comite", specifying that he and "fratre suo Aldeberto" were captured by Guy Vicomte de Limoges and imprisoned "in castro Montiniaco" and that Audebert was held for a long time "in turre civitatis Lemovicæ". The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Aldebertus comes…Petragoricensis" as son of "Bosonis Vetuli ex sorore Bernardi…Emma". He succeeded his father [before 974] as Comte de la Marche . He succeeded [after 975] as Comte de Périgord, inherited from his mother's family. The Miracula Sancti Bernardi names "Hildebertusus…Bosonis filius", stating that he inherited "ex materni avi successione comitatum Petragoricæ urbis". "Hildeberti comitis…" subscribed the charter dated Dec 992 under which "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent. He invaded the county of Poitou with the intention of dispossessing Guillaume II Comte de Poitou, captured Gençais and threatened Charroux. He died from an arrow wound received at Gençais, from where he was carried to Charroux. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Aldebertus comes…Petragoricensis" captured "Gentiaco…castro" but died from an arrow wound at "sancto Carrofo" where he was taken. His date of death is indicated by the charter dated 998 under which "Boso comes" donated property to Uzerche, for the soul of "fratris mei Gauberti…Ildeberti fratris mei memoria".
m ([990]) as her first husband, ADALMODE de Limoges, daughter of GERAUD Vicomte de Limoges & his wife Rothilde de Brosse. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Aldebertus frater [Helias Petragoricensi comite]" married "sorore Widonis vicecomitis". Ademar records the second marriage of "Adalmode coniuge…Aldeberti" to Duke William. The Chronicle of Petrus Malleacensis records that Adalmodis was wife of Boson Comte du Périgord and daughter of "Candida", for whom Duke Guillaume promised to expand "fluvium Rhodanum Regni" in return for marrying her daughter, but this is inconsistent with the other sources. According to the Chronicle of Maillezais, Adalmode was the daughter of Adelais d'Anjou (presumably by her firrst husband Etienne de Brioude/Gévaudan), and also widow of Boson Comte du Périgord (brother of Comte Audebert I, whom he survived by several years). Thierry Stasser has shown that this is incorrect. After her first husband was killed, Adalmode sought refuge in the château de Rochemeaux but was forced to surrender by Poitevin forces. She married secondly ([997]) as his first wife, Guillaume V Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume III Comte de Poitou].
Comte Audebert I & his first wife had one child.”«s87» 
Audebert I Comte de la Marche (I14679)
 
216 “AUDOIN (-in Pannonia 560). The Historia Langobardorum names "Audoin ex genere…Gausus" and his mother "Menia uxor…Pissæ regis". He was installed as AUDOIN King of the Lombards in Hungary in [547] in succession to King Walthari. The Origo Gentntis Langobardorum records that "Auduin" reigned after Walthari, specifying that he brought the Lombards into Pannonia and, in a later passage, stating that they remained in Pannonia for 43 years. Byzantium encouraged the Lombards to consolidate their position in Pannonia by granting them the city of Noricum and other strongholds, though it is reported that they celebrated by raiding Dalmatia and Illyricum. The war with the Gepids, which started in [547], was settled by a peace treaty imposed by Emperor Justinian in 552, under which the Lombards sent troops to Italy to help Narses rout the Ostrogoths. The Historia Langobardorum records that Audoin died in Pannonia. m firstly RODELINDA [Roddenda], daughter of ---. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Roddenda" as mother of "Albuin filius [Auduini]". The Historia Langobardorum names "Rodelenda" as mother of Alboin. Paulus Diaconus names "Rodelindam" as wife of Audoin and mother of Alboin. m secondly --- of the Thuringians, daughter of HERMINAFRID King of the Thuringians & his wife Amalaberga the Ostrogoth. The Codex Theodosianus records that the daughter of Amalaberga became the second wife of King Audoin. King Audoin & his first wife had [two] children:
a) ALBOIN (-murdered 28 Jun 572). The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Albuin" as son of "Auduin". Paulus Diaconus names "Alboin, filius Audoin" when recording his succession. He succeeded in 560 as ALBOIN King of the Lombards in Pannonia. He was crowned ALBOIN King of the Lombards in Italy at Milan in [570].
b) [---. m ---.]
i) GISULF . Shield-bearer of Alboin King of the Lombards, who installed him as duke in the region of Friuli after the Longobard migration into Italy in [569]. Paulus Diaconus records that King Alboin installed "Gisulfum…suum nepotem" as "ducem…[in] Foroiulanæ civitati". The Chronicle of Andreas Bergomatis records that Alboin conceded Friuli to "nepoti sui Gisolfi". The precise relationship between Gisulf and King Alboin is unknown and may have been more remote than implied by "nephew" if the word nepos if translated strictly in these passages.”«s87» 
DE LANGOBARDI, Auduin (Alduin, Audoin) (I10727)
 
217 “AZNAR Galíndez (-893). The Codex de Roda names "Asnari Galindones" as the son of "Galindo Asnari" and his unnamed wife. He succeeded his father as Conde de Aragón. m ONECA García de Pamplona, daughter of GARCÍA I Iñíguez King of Pamplona & his first wife Urraca ---. The Codex de Roda names "Fortunio Garseanis et Sanzio Garseanis et domna Onneca" as the children of "Garsea Enneconis " and his unnamed wife, stating that Oneca married "Asnari Galindones de Aragone". Aznar Galindez & his wife had three children:
a) GALINDO [II] Aznar (-923)...
b) GARCÍA Aznar. The Codex de Roda names "Galindo Asnari et Garsea Asnari et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Galindones" and his wife.
c) SANCHA Aznar. The Codex de Roda names "Galindo Asnari et Garsea Asnari et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Galindones" and his wife, stating that Sancha married "regis Atoele mauro". m MUHAMMAD Ali Tawill Wali of Huesca, son of ---.” 
Aznar Galíndez II Conde de Aragón (I14892)
 
218 “AZNAR Sánchez de Larraún . The Codex de Roda names "Asnari Sanziones qui et Larron" as son of "Sanzio Garseanis". m (880) as her second husband, his first cousin, ONECA [Íñiga] Fortún de Pamplona, repudiated wife of ABD ALLAH [later ABD ALLAH I Emir of Córdoba], daughter of FORTÚN García King of Pamplona & his wife Aurea --- ([850]-). The Codex de Roda names "Enneco Furtunionis et Asenari Furtuniones et Belasco Furtuniones et Lope Furtuniones et domna Onneca" as the children of "F"Furtunio Garseanis" and his wife, recording that Oneca married "Asenari Sanzones de Larron" (a second manuscript specifying that she was "suam congermanam") and afterwards married "regi Abdella" by whom she was mother of "Mahomat Iben Abdella". However, this is unsustainable chronologically if it is correct that she was the mother of Muhammad and that he died an adult in 890. On the assumption that this date is correct, it is assumed that Abd Allah was Oneca's first husband. She married her second husband after returning from Córdoba in [880] with her father who had just been released from captivity. Aznar Sánchez & his wife had three children:
(a) SANCHO Aznárez . The Codex de Roda names "Santio Asnari et domna Tota regina et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Sanziones qui et Larron" and his wife.
(b) TODA Aznárez ([885]-after 970). The Codex de Roda names "Santio Asnari et domna Tota regina et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Sanziones qui et Larron" and his wife, one manuscript specifying that Tota was the wife of "Sanctii Obtimi regis". m as his second wife, SANCHO I García King of Navarre, son of GARCÍA II Jiménez King of Pamplona & his first wife Oneca --- ([865]-11 Dec 925).
(c) SANCHA Aznárez. The Codex de Roda names "Santio Asnari et domna Tota regina et domna Sanzia" as the children of "Asnari Sanziones qui et Larron" and his wife, in a later passage naming "domna Sanzia, Asnari Santionis filia" as wife of "Scemeno Garseanis" and recording that she was killed "in Galias in villa…Laco" by her son García Jiménez. m JIMENO García de Pamplona, son of GARCÍA II Jimenez King of Pamplona & his second wife Dadildis de Pallars (-931).”«s87» 
Aznar Sánchez de Larraún (I14863)
 
219 “ÆLFRED, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (Wantage, Berkshire 849-26 Oct 899, bur Winchester Cathedral, transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester, later called the New Minster). Asser records the birth in 849 of Alfreed, son of King Æthelwulf, at Wantage in Berkshire. "Ælfred filius regis" subscribed charters of Kings Æthelwulf, Æthelberht, Æthelred I in 855, 862 (anachronistic), 864 and 868. Asser records that in 853, his father sent him to Rome where Pope Leo IV baptised him. He succeeded his brother in 871 as ALFRED King of Wessex. After the Danish victory at Wilton in May 871, King Alfred agreed to pay Danegeld for the first time as the price for ceasing further attacks. After a second invasion of Wessex in 875/77, during which Wareham in Dorset and Exeter were occupied, Alfred again bought peace in 877. He was forced to flee westwards in the face of a third invasion in 878 during which Chippenham was occupied, and took refuge at Athelney in Somerset. King Alfred's subsequent counter-offensive proved more effective, as he defeated the Danes under Guthrum at Edington in Wiltshire in May 878. After mixed successes against the Danes in East Anglia in 885, and his occupation of London in 886, Alfred made a peace treaty with Guthrum which lasted until 892. "Ælfred rex" subscribed a charter of "Æthelred dux et patricius gentis Merciorum" dated 887. The Danish offensive of 892/96 was less successful and no furthrther Danish attacks on Wessex are recorded after 896. King Alfred is famous for the fleet of ships built to his design in the hope of defeating the Danes while they were still at sea, considered as forming the basis for the modern English navyvy. Having learnt Latin late in life, Alfred was responsible for English translations of five Latin works between 892 and 899: Gregory the Great's Cura Pastoralis, Orosius's History of the Ancient World, Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica, Boethius's De Consolatione Philosophae, and a collection which starts with the Soliloquies of St Augustine. He was also responsible for a collection of laws, although these were largely refinements of the works of his predecessors Ine King of Wessex, Offa King of Mercia and Æthelberht King of Kent. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Alfred on 26 Oct 899. King Alfred, under his will probably dated to [879/88], made bequests (in order) to "Edward my elder son", his unnamed younger son, his unnamed eldest, middle and youngest daughters, "my brother's son Æthelhelm…my brother's son Æthelwold…my kinsman Osferth" and Ealswith.
m (Winchester 868) EALHSWITH, daughter of ÆTHELRED "Mucil" Ealdorman of the Gainas & his wife Eadburh (-Winchester 5 or 8 Dec 905, bur Winchester, St Mary's Abbey, transferred to Winchester Cathedral). Asser records the marriage in 868 of Alfred and "a noble Mercian lady, daughter of Athelred surnamed Mucil earl of the Gaini…[and] Edburga of the royal line of Mercia". Roger of Hoveden records the names of her parents, specifying that her mother was related to the kings of Mercia. "Ealhswith mater regis" subscribed a charter of King Edward dated 901. She founded the convent of St Mary's at Winchester, and became a nun there after her husband died. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in [902/05] of "Ealhswith".
King Alfred & Queen Ealhswith had [seven] children:
1. ÆTHELFLÆD ([869]-Tamworth 12 Jun 918, bur Gloucester Cathedral). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva…Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd" as the children of King Alfred & his wife, specifying that Ethelfled was married to "Ethhered earl of Mercia". "Egelfledam Merciorum dominam" is named by Roger of Hoveden first in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith. "Æthelflæd conjux" subscribed a charter of "Æthelred dux et patricius gentis Merciorum" granting land in Oxfordshire to the bishopric of Worcester dated 887. "Æthelflæd" also subscribed the joint charter of King Alfred and "Æthelred subregulus et patricius Merciorum" dated 889, the charter of "Æthered" dated 901, and three charters of King Edward dated 903 and 904, in the last of which her name is listed immediately after her husband's and before "Æthelswitha regina". Known as the "Lady of the Mercians", she effectively governed Mercia after her husband's death "save only London and Oxford". Florence of Worcester records that she carried out a plan of fortress building to protect Mercia from the Danes, at Bridgenorth in 912, Tamworth and Stafford in 913, Eddisbury Hill in Cheshire and Warwick in 914, and Chirbury and Runcorn in 915. Her Mercian troops played a decisive part in her brother's offensive against the Danes in the Midlands in 917, conquering Derby and Tempsford where they killed the Danish king of the East Angles, and Leicester in early 918. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 918 of Æthelflæd "12 days before midsummer at Tamworth in the eighth year of her rule over Mercia as its rightful lord" and her burial at Gloucester St Peter's church. m ([end 889]) ÆTHELRED Ealdorman of western Mercia, son of --- (-912). Ealdorman of Mercia, ruling in the part of Mercia not ruled by the Danes, from [883] when he appears for the first time in a charter. Alfred King of Wessex was his overlord. He presided over the Merciaian council and led the Mercian armies. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 885 "king Alfred occupied London…and he then entrusted the city to ealdorman Æthelred to rule". "Æthelred dux" subscribed a charter of King Alfred dated 892. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 893 "ealdorman Æthelred and ealdorman Æthelhelm and ealdorman Æthelnoth" besieged and later defeated the Danes "at Buttington on Severn shore" [Buttington, near Welshpool, Montgomeryshire], consolidating EEnglish gains to the east and extending the authority of Wessex. "Æthelredus principes Merciorum", "Æthelred" and "Æthelredus dux et dominator Merciorum" subscribed charters of King Edward dated [900/04] and [903/04]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 912 of "Æthelred ealdorman of Mercia". Æthelflæd & her husband had [two] children:
a) [ÆTHELSTAN ([890/92]-[903/04]). "Æthelstan dux filius Etheredi" subscribed the joint charter of King Edward and "Æthelred" dated [903/04], named immediately after "Æthelflæd" and before "Æthelred dux et dominator Merciorum" (assumed to be ididentified with the co-grantor) in the list of subscribers. It is unlikely that this is a transcription error for "Æthelstan son of King Edward" as it seems improbable that even the most incompetent scribe would make a mistake in the name of the king. The positioning of his name in the list of subscribers indicates a close relationship with Æthelflæd and her husband Æthelred. His position before his supposed father may indicate seniority due to his blood relationship with the monarch. There seems no reason not to propose that Æthelstan may have been this couple's son, unrecorded in other sources, who died soon after the date of the charter.]
b) ÆLFWYNN (-after 919). She is named as her parents' only daughter by Roger of Hoveden. After her mother's death, she was left in nominal authority in Mercia by her uncle King Edward "the Elder", until he had her removed from Mercia to Wessex in early Dec 919. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Ælfwynn, daughter of Æthelred lord of the Mercians, was deprived of all authority in Mercia and taken to Wessex three weeks before Christmas.
2. EADMUND (-young). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva…Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd besides those who died in their infancy one of whom was Edmund" as the children of King Alfred & his wife. While Asser does not specifify where Edmund fits in the order of births, it is a fair assumption that he was the eldest son otherwise he may not have been deemed worthy of mention. According to Weir, Edmund was crowned in the lifetime of his father, but it is assumed that this is based on a misreading of the charter of King Alfred dated 898 which was subscribed by "Eadweard rex".
3. EADWEARD ([872]-Farndon-on-Dee near Chester 17 Jul 924, bur Winchester Cathedral). "Eadwardum" is named by Roger of Hoveden as the younger of King Alfred's sons by Queen Ealswith. He succeeded his father in 899 as EDWARD "the Elder" King of Wessex.
4. ELFREDA . The Book of Hyde names "Elfredam virginam" as second of the four daughters of King Alfred & his wife. She is not named by Asser as one of the children of King Alfred.
5. ÆTHELGIVA (-[896], bur Shaftesbury Abbey). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva…Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd" as the children of King Alfred & his wife, specifying that Ethelgiva "was dedicated to God and submitted to thhe rules of a monastic life". "Ethelgivam sanctimonialem" is named by Roger of Hoveden second in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealswith. Nun at Shaftesbury Abbey, Dorset, elected the first Abbess in [888]. The Book of Hyde names "Elgivam virginam" as third of the four daughters of King Alfred & his wife, specifying that she was "Schaftlouiæ abbatissa".
6. ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Ghent, St Pieter). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva… Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd" as the children of King Alfred & his wife[1209]. "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealswith. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest of preventing Viking settlements along the coast. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "Elftrudis comitissa". The Memorial of "filia regis Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii". m ([893/99]) BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders, son of BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders & his wife Judith of the Franks [Carolingian] ([863/65]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Ghent, St Pieter).
7. ÆTHELWEARD ([880]-16 Oct 922, bur Winchester Cathedral). Asser names (in order) "Ethelfled the eldest…Edward…Ethelgiva …Ethelwitha and Ethelwerd" as the children of King Alfred & his wife. "Egelwardum" is named by Roger of Hoveden as the younger of King Alfred's sons by Queen Ealhswith. "Æthelweard filius regis" subscribed charters of King Edward dated 900, 901 (three), 903 and 904 (in all but two of which he is named first in the list of subscribers), and "Æthelweard frater regiis" subscribed two charters dated 909 (in both of which he is named first in the list of subscribers, ahead of the king's sons). Simeon of Durham records the death "XVII Kal Nov" in 922 of "Ethelward the Atheling brother of King Eadward" and his burial in Winchester. m ---. The name of the wife of Æthelweard is not known. Æthelweard & his wife had [three] children:
a) [TURKETUL (-3 Jul 975, bur Croyland Abbey). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland names Turketul Chancellor of King Æthelstan, later abbot of Croyland, as "eldest son" of Æthelweard, bother of King Eadweard. This has not been corroborated in any other source so far consulted. The same source records that Turketul became a monk at Croyland in the second year of the reign of King Eadred. A further clue about his ancestry is provided by Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland recording that Turketul's "kinsman Osketul" was installed as Archbishop of York. The same source records the death of Turketul "V Non Jul" in 975 and his burial in the church at Croyland.]
b) ÆLFWIN (-killed in battle Brunanburh 937, bur Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire). King Æthelstan donated property to Malmesbury for the souls of "patruelium meorum Æthelwardi clitonis videlicet Ælfwinis et Æthelwinis" by three charters dated 937. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that King Æthelstan's "two kinsmen, Elwin and Athelstan, the sons of his uncle Ethelward" were killed in battle by the Danes at Bruneford.
c) ÆTHELWIN (-killed in battle Brunanburh 937, bur Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire). King Æthelstan donated property to Malmesbury for the souls of "patruelium meorum Æthelwardi clitonis videlicet Ælfwinis et Æthelwinis" by three charters dated 937. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that King Æthelstan's "two kinsmen, Elwin and Athelstan, the sons of his uncle Ethelward" were killed in battle by the Danes at Bruneford.”«s87» 
Alfred or Ælfred King of Wessex (I11986)
 
220 “ÆTHELRED "Mucel" (-885 or after). "Mucel dux" subscribed a charter of King Æthelred I dated 868[92]. Ealdorman of the Gainas, in Mercia. m EADBURGA, daughter of [CENWULF King of Mercia & his wife Elfrida]. Asser records that Alfred's mother-in-law "Edburga of the royal line of Mercia…was a venerable lady and after the decease of her husband, she remained many years a widow, even till her own death". According to Weir, she was perhaps the daughter of Cenwulf King of Mercia. The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified, and the chronology is not favourable considering King Cenwulf's death in 821. Æthelred & his wife had two children:
a) ÆTHELWULF (-903). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 903 of "ealdorman Æthelwulf the brother of Ealswith, the mother of King Edward". Ealdorman.
b) EALHSWITH ([848/53]-904). Asser records the marriage in 868 of Alfred and "a noble Mercian lady, daughter of Athelred surnamed Mucil earl of the Gaini…[and] Edburga of the royal line of Mercia". Roger of Hoveden records the names of her parents, specifying that her mother was related to the kings of Mercia. Her birth date is estimated from her having given birth to her first child in 869. "Ealhswith mater regis" subscribed a charter of King Edward dated 901. She founded the convent of St Mary's at Winchester, and became a nun there after her husband died. m (868) ALFRED of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [first] wife Osburga (Wantage, Berkshire 849-26 Oct 899, bur Winchester Cathedral, transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester, later called the New Minster). He succeeded in 871 as ALFRED King of Wessex.”«s87» 
Æthelred “Mucil” Ealdorman of the Gainas (I13797)
 
221 “ÆTHELRED, son of EDGAR "the Peaceable" King of England & his second wife Ælfthryth of Devon ([966]-London 23 Apr 1016, bur Old St Paul's Cathedral). Simeon of Durham names "Eadmuind and Egelræd" as the sons of King Eadgar and his wife "the dauaughter of Ordgar duke of Devonshire…". Roger of Hoveden gives his parentage. When his father died, a large number of nobles promoted the election of Æthelred to succeed instead of his older half-brother, maybe because the latter was considered unsuitable due to his outbursts of rage or because of the inferior status of his mother. He succeeded after the murder of his half-brother in 978 as ÆTHELRED II "the Unready/Unræd/Redeles" King of England, crowned 4 Apr or 4 May 978 at Kingstston-upon-Thames. Danish attacks on England recommenced in 980, with raids on Hampshire, Thanet and Cheshire. Raids on Devon and Cornwall followed in 981, and on Dorset in 982. A further wave of attacks started in 988 in Devon. As part of hihis plan to control the Danes, King Æthelred agreed a non-aggression pact with Richard I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie on 1 Mar 991, designed apparently to dissuade either party from sheltering Viking marauders. After a third wave of attacks iin 991, King Æthelred signed a treaty with Olaf Tryggveson (who succeeded in [995] as Olav I King of Norway) under which 22,000 pounds of gold and silver was paid in return for a promise of help in thwarting future attacks. The treaty presumablbly never came into full effect, despite payment of the money, as this was only the first of a long series of "Danegeld" payments funded by heavy taxation which ultimately led to the virtual ruin of King Æthelred's government. The attack of 9944, in which for the first time Svend King of Denmark took part, resulted in some English support to declare Svend king from those who despaired of King Æthelred's government. The raids of 997/999 on Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, South Wales, Dorseset and Kent, were followed in 1000 by the Danish army moving to Normandy to await the following summer. The king's second marriage in 1002 was presumably part of his continuing efforts to prevent the Normans from allowing the Danes to use theiir ports from which to attack England. King Æthelred ordered the massacre of Danes in England 13 Nov 1002, which included the death of Gunhild sister of King Svend, although this only resulted in intensified attacks. In a desperate late attempmpt to strengthen the country's defences, King Æthelred ordered the construction of a fleet of new warships, completed in 1009. Nearly one third of the fleet was lost as a result of the rebellion of Wulfnoth, father of Godwin Earl of Wessex, and the attempt by Brihtric, brother of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor", to capture him. A full-scale Danish invasion came in 1013 and by the end of the year Svend King of Denmark had become de facto king of England. King Æthelred fled to Normandy after Christmas 1013, but after Svend's death in Feb 1014 he was invited back, on condition he improved his rule. By end-Apr 1014, Æthelred counter-attacked the Danes in Lindsey, after which the Danish fleet, under King Svend's son Knud, withdrew to Denmark. In August 1015, Knud of Denmark invaded England again. During the latter part of King Æthelred's reign further trouble was caused by the treachery of his son-in-law Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor", appointed Ealdorman of Mercia in 1007. He acquired a position of considerable influence over the king, only to defect to Knud after this last invasion. The Danes controlled Wessex by the end of 1015, and Northumbria in early 1016, turning their attention to London and the south-east after King Æthelred died. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death on St George's day 1016 of King Æthelred.
m firstly ([980/85]) ÆLFLÆD, daughter of THORED Ealdorman of York & his wife Hilda ([963]-Winchester Feb 1002). The contemporary primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. According to the Estoire de Seint Aedward le Rei, written in [1245], the first wife of King Æthelred II was the daughter of "Count Torin". The primary source which names her has not been identified. It is curious that in charters dated 996, King Æthelred's mother countersigns "Ælfthryth regina", but there is no mention of the king's wife. The will of her son ætheling Æthelstan, dated [1014], refers to "the soul of Ælfthryth my grandmother who brought me up" while making no mention of his mother, which suggessts that the latter played little part in his early life. This seems suprising if she was in fact that mother of all King Æthelred's children who were not born to his known second wife Emma. There must therefore be some doubt whether Ælflæd was the king's only wife or concubine before his second marriage.
m secondly (betrothed 1000, 1002) as her first husband, EMMA de Normandie, daughter of RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte de Normandie & his second wife Gunnora --- ([985]-Winchester 14 Mar 1052, bur Winchester Cathedral, Old Minster). Guillaume de JuJumièges names Emma as one of the three daughters of Duke Richard and Gunnor. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Emma Anglorum regina" as sister of "dux Normannie Richardus II". Emma was described by Henry of Huntingdon as "Emmmma Normanorum gemma", although it is not known whether this was a particular indication of her beauty or mere hyperbole. She adopted the name "ÆLFGIFU" in England. "Ælfgifu regina" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II between 1002 and 10122, also referred to as "Ælfgifu conlaterana regis". Her first husband sent her to her brother's court in Normandy in 1013 after the invasion of Svend King of Denmark. She was living in Normandy in 1017 when King Æthelred's successor King Canute proposed marriage to her. She married King Canute as her second husband (2 or 31 Jul 1017). After the death of her second husband, she continued to live at Winchester. After the election of her step-son as regent in early 1036, it was recognised that she would continue to live there to look after the interests of her son Harthacnut (then absent in Denmark), who had nominally succeeded his father as King of England and Denmark. It is likely that she encouraged her sons by her firsst husband, Edward and Alfred, to join her. After Harold was recognised as King of England in 1037, Queen Emma was expelled from England and took refuge at Bruges. She commissioned the work later known as the Encomium Emmæ Reginæ from a Flemish convent at Saint-Omer, maybe St Bertin's, designed to promote her son Harthacnut's claim to the English throne. Harthacnut joined her in Bruges in early 1040, and after the death of King Harold, they returned together to England. After the accession of Edward "the Confessor" to the English throne, Emma appears to have supported the rival claim of Magnus King of Norway. Whatever the truth of this, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Edward did confiscate her property in 1043. She seems to have spent the last years of her life in retirement in Winchester. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of "Ælfgifu Emma, the mother of king Edward and of king Harthacnut" in 1052.
King Æthelred II & [his first wife] had eleven children:
1. ÆTHELSTAN ([986]-killed in battle after 25 Jun 1014). "Æthelstanus filius regis/clito/ætheling" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 993 and 1013, his name being recorded consistently first among his brothers and specified aas "primogenitus" in 1004. He was killed fighting the Danes. Ætheling Æthelstan, under his will dated [1014], made bequests (in order) to "my father King Æthelred, my brother Eadmund, my brother Eadwig, Ælfmær…Godwine, Wulfnoth's son…my fosteer mother Ælfswith, my mass priest Ælfwine, my seneschal Ælfmær, Sigeferth…Æthelweard the Stammerer and Lifing…Leofstan the brother of Leofwine Cwatt…Leofmær of Bygrave, Godwine the Driveller, Eadric son of Wynflæd…", names "Ælfmær, Ælfric's son" and refers to "the soul of Ælfthryth my grandmother who brought me up".
2. ECGBERHT (-1005). "Ecgbyrht/Ecbyrhtus filius regis/clito" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 993 and 1005, in all cases named directly after his brother Æthelstan, consistent with Ecgberht being the second son.
3. EADMUND ([990]-30 Nov 1016, bur Glastonbury Abbey). "Eadmundus filius regis/clito/ætheling" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 993 and 1015, the last dated 1015 being signed "Eadmund regie indolis soboles". He succeeded his father in 1016 as EDMUND "Ironside" King of England.
4.EADRED (-[1012]). "Eadred regis filius/clito" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 993 and [1012/13], a charter dated 1011 specifying "Eadred tercia proles regia". Eadred was named after "Eadmund" in all lists in which the two appear, consistent with his being his father's fourth son. "Eadric clito" subscribed a charter of King Æthelred II dated 1005. As this charter is not one subscribed by "Eadred", it is reasonable to assume that this is a copyist's error rather than that King Æthelred had another son of this name. "Eadred clito" countersigned his father's 1006 charter making grants to St Alban's, signing fifth among the brothers.
5. EADWIG (-murdered 1017, bur Tavistock Abbey, Devon[1411]). "Eadwius/Eadwig filius regis/clito" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 1000 and 1014. He is named after his brother Eadred in the lists of subscribers, indicating that Eadwig was the fifth son. Eadwig countersigned his father's charter dated 1002 which grants land at Codicote, Hertfordshire to Ælthelm, signing fifth among his brothers, and "Eadwig clito" his father's 1006 charter which made grants to St Alban's, signing sixth. Ætheling Æthelstan, under his will dated [1014], made bequests to "…my brother Eadmund, my brother Eadwig…". He was banished "by the counsel of the perfidious ealdorman Eadric" and murdered on the orders of King Canute. Simeon of Durham records that King Canute outlawed "the Atheling Edwy the brother of king Eadmund who was called King of the Churls" in 1017.
6. EADGAR (-[1012/15]). "Eadgarus filius regis/clito" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 1001 and 1008. He is named after his brother Eadwig in the lists of subscribers, consistent with Eadgar being the sixth son. Eadgar countersigned his father's charter dated 1002 which grants land at Codicote, Hertfordshire to Ælthelm, signing sixth among his brothers, and "Eadgar clito" his father's 1006 charter which made grants to St Alban's, signing seventh.
7. EADGYTH (-after 11 Nov 1021). Roger of Hoveden names her as the daughter of King Æthelred when recording her first marriage. Florence of Worcester records that she was banished from England with her second husband 11 Nov 1021. m firstly (1009) EADRIC "Streona/the Acquisitor", son of --- (-murdered 25 Dec 1017). One of the main advisers of King Æthelred II from [1006], he acquired a position of considerable power but gained a reputation for treachery. He was made Ealdorman of Mercia in 1007. He changed sides several times during 1014/1016, wavering between Edmund "Ironside" or Canute depending on who had the upper hand at the time, but finally abandoned Edmund's cause at the battle of Ashingdon. Canute appointed Eadric as Ealdorman of Mercia in 1017, but had him murdered in 1017. m secondly (1017 or after) THORKELL "Havi/the Tall", son of [STRUTHARALD King in Skane] (-killed in battle 1039). One of the leaders of the Danish invasion of England in 1009. He changed sides and supported Æthelred II King of England at the end of 1012, but defected back to join the invasion fleet of Knud of Denmark in Aug 1015. King Canute appointed him Ealdorman of the East Angles 1017 after the murder of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor", whose widow he married. It is probable that the King appointed him Regent of England 1019, during his absence in Denmark. King Canute outlawed him 11 Nov 1021, but they entered a pact of reconciliation in 1023 under which Thorkell would govern Denmark and each would keep the other's son as hostage. He remained regent in Denmark for about three years, being replaced by Ulf, King Knud's brother-in-law. He was killed by the Welsh.
8. ÆLFGIFU ([1090/95]-). She is named as daughter of King Æthelred by Roger of Hoveden, when he records her marriage. Her birth date range is estimated from her having given birth to her daughter before 1016. m ([1009/16]) as his third wife, UHTRED Earl of Northumbria, son of WALTHEOF Earl of Northumbria & his wife --- (-murdered 1016).
9. WULFHILD . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m ULFCYTEL "Snillingr/the Valliant", son of --- (-killed in battle Ashingdon Oct 1016). Ealdorman of East Anglia. After being surprised by the forces of Svend King of Denmark which landed at Norwich, he made peace with the invader. After the Danes broke the treaty, Ulfcytel forced them to retreat to their ships. He was defeated by the Danes outside Thetford in 1004, and again in East Anglia 18 May 1009. He was defeated by the Danes 5 May 1010 at Ringmere after their landing near Ipswich. He was killed in King Edmund II's final battle against Canute.
10. daughter. m ÆTHELSTAN, son of --- (-killed in battle Ringmere 5 May 1010). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names Athelstan as "the king's son-in-law", killed by the Danes after they landed near Ipswich. Simeon of Durham names "Ethelstan the son-in-law of king Ethelred" among those killed in battle by the Danes "in East Anglia…Ringmere".
11. daughter (-after 1051). Abbess of Wherwell. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that the abbess of Wherwell was the king's sister but does not name her when recording that she received Queen Eadgyth in 1051 after the disgrace of her family.
King Æthelred II & his second wife had three children:
12.EADWARD ([1005]-Palace of Westminster 5 Jan 1066, bur Westminster Abbey). "Eadweard clito/filius regis" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated between 1005 and 1015. He is named after his half-brother Eadgar in all documents in which the two are mentioned together, consistent with Edward being the junior of the two. Edward fled England for Normandy with his mother in 1013 after the invasion of Svend King of Denmark. Anointed king of England during the lifetime of his father, probably in 1015 when his older half-brother, later King Edmund, was in dispute with their father over his unauthorised marriage. This assumes that Edward returned to England from Normandy with his father. According to Orderic Vitalis, EdEdward and his brother Alfred were living in exile in Normandy when Duke Robert left on pilgrimage for Jerusalem in [1035]. After the appointment of Harold "Harefod/Harefoot" as regent of England in 1036, Edward landed along Southampton Water tto rejoin his mother who, on hearing of the fate of her other son Alfred, sent Edward back to Normandy. He returned to England in 1041 and was "sworn in as future king" according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. On his half-brother's death, he waas elected EDWARD "the Confessor" King of England in London, crowned at Winchester Cathedral 3 Apr 1043. His relations with his mother were strained as she appears to have supported the claim of Magnus King of Norway to the English throne on thhe death of King Harthacnut. Whatever the truth of this, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Edward confiscated her treasury in 1043. Godwin Earl of Wessex enjoyed a position of power during King Edward's reign, marrying his daughter tto the king in 1045. However, the king's relations with Earl Godwin became tense after a dispute over the appointment of a new archbishop of Canterbury in 1050. In 1051, Earl Godwin refused the king's order to punish an affray at Canterbury, in which one of Eustache Comte de Boulogne's men was killed. The dispute escalated, and 1 Sep 1051 Godwin made a show of force against the king with his two older sons near Tetbury. Leofric Earl of Mercia and Siward Earl of Northumbria supported King Edward, and battle was avoided. Godwin and his family were given five days' safe conduct to leave the country by the king's council 8 Sep 1051. It was probably about this time that Edward promised the throne to Guillaume II Duke of Normandy, as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the duke's visit to England in 1051. Earl Godwin was restored in 1052, after another show of force. After Godwin's death in 1053, his son Harold assumed his earldom and became as powerful in the kingdom as his father had been. It appears that King Edward gradually withdrew from active government, becoming more involved in religious matters and especially planning the construction of Westminster Abbey, which was finally consecrated 28 Dec 10065 although Edward was by then too infirm to attend. Despite his earlier promise of the succession to Guillaume Duke of Normandy, on his deathbed King Edward bequeathed the kingdom to Harold Godwinson Earl of Wessex, a choice which was accepteted unanimously by the members of the council. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the king's death "on the vigil of…Epiphany" and his burial in Westminster abbey the next day. King Edward was canonised 7 Feb 1161, his feast day is 13 Oct. m (23 Jan 1045) EADGYTH, daughter of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha ([1020/22]-Winchester 18 Dec 1075, bur Westminster Abbey). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 1045 "king Edward took to wife Edith the daughter of Earl Godwin, ten ddays before Candlemas". Her husband confined her to Wherwell Abbey in 1051 when the rest of her family was banished, but she was brought back to court when her father was restored the following year. She commissioned the Vita Ædwardi Regis from a foreign clerk, probably from Saint-Omer, setting out the history of her family. She continued to live around Winchester after the Norman conquest, and appears to have been treated well by King William I. Florence of Worcester records the death "XIV Kal Jan" in [1074] of "Edgitha regis Haroldi germana quondam Anglorum regina" at Winchester and her burial at Westminster.
13. ÆLFRED (after 1005-Ely 5 Feb 1036, bur Ely Cathedral). "Ælfred clito" subscribed two charters of King Æthelred II dated 1013 and 1014. He fled to Normandy with his mother in 1013. He and his brother Edward were living in exile in Normandy when Duke Robert left on pilgrimage for Jerusalem (in [1035]). He landed in England in 1036 with his brother Edward to rejoin their mother at Winchester, but was arrested by Godwin Earl of Wessex's troops. He was taken first to Guildford, surrendered to King Harold's servants, then taken to Ely, where he was blinded and died soon after from his injuries, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which places the blame for the murder of Earl Godwin.
14. GODGIFU [Goda] (-before 1049). Her parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Godgifu went into exile in Normandy with her brother in 1013. According to Orderic Vitalis, her first marriage was arranged by Robert II Duke of Normandy, indicating that she probably did not return to England after leaving for exile. However, this information is suspect, assuming that the charter of "Robertus Rex", which names "Comes Drogo…cum duobus fratribus Fulcone…et Rodulpho necnon uxoore cum filiis supra memorati Drogonis", is correctly dated to 1025 as Duke Robert did not succeed as duke of Normandy until 1027. Another possibility is that Drogo's children at that date were born from an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage. There is no indication of the birth dates of his known children, but the fact that none of them was given a typically Anglo-Saxon name also suggests that Godgifu may not have been the mother of all or any of them. Godgifu's second marriage iis referred to by Florence of Worcester. m firstly ([1025 or before]) DREUX [Drogo] Comte de Mantes et du Vexin, son of GAUTHIER [II] "le Blanc" Comte de Mantes, de Valois, d'Amiens et du Vexin & his wife Adèle --- (-1035). m secondly ([1036]) as his first wife, EUSTACHE [II] Comte de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain (-[soon after 1070/1087]).”«s87» 
Æthelred II “The Unready” King of England (I11911)
 
222 “ÆTHELWULF, son of ECGBERHT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/810]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester Cathedral). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names Æthelwulf as son of Ecgberht. Kirby suggests that Æthelwulf could have been born as late as 81810, although this would not be consistent with the supposed date of his father's marriage and is unlikely to be correct if Æthelstan (see below) was King Æthelwulf's son. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 825 "Egbert king of Wessex…sent his son Æthelwulf…and Wulfheard his ealdorman to Kent with a great force" where they expelled King Baldred. "Æthelwulfi regis filii mei" was co-grantor of land at Canterbury to "Ciaba clericus" with "Ægberhtus rex occidentalium Saxonum" by charter dated 836. "Æthelwulf rex Cancie" was co-grantor of land in Kent with "Egberthus rex occident Saxonum pater meus" by charters dated [833/39] and 838 respectively. Under-King of Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey 825-839. He succeeded his father in 839 as ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, crowned [later in 839] at Kingston-upon-Thames. Danish raids intensified during his reign. Great damage was done in Lindsey, East Anglia and Kent in 841, and Southampton was plundered in 842. Before 850, King Æthelwulf had settled the ancient dispute with Mercia about the lands to the west of the middle Thames by transferring Berkshire from Mercia to Wessex. He defeated a large Danish army south of the Thames at Aclea in 851 after it had stormed Canterbury and London and driven Burghred King of Mercia to flight. King Æthelwulf made a pilgrimage to Rome in 855, leaving the government in the hands of his son Æthelbald. At the request of Pope Benedict III, he made a public distributution of gold and silver to the clergy, leading men of Rome and the people. William of Malmesbury records that Æthelbald rebelled against his father during his absence and, after returning, King Æthelwulf abdicated part of his realm in Wessex in favour of his son to avoid civil war, continuing to rule in the other part of Wessex, Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death of King Æthelwulf two years after returning from Rome and his burial at Winchester.
[m] [firstly] ([815/20]) ---. There is no direct proof of this supposed first marriage. However, the likely birth date of King Æthelwulf's son Æthelstan suggests a substantial age difference with his brothers, indicating that he was probably not born from the same mother.
m [secondly] ([830/33]) OSBURGA, daughter of OSLAC Ealdorman of the Isle of Wight & his wife --- (-[852/55]). Asser names "Osburga…daughter of Oslac the famous butler of King Æthelwulf…a Goth by nation" as the mother of King Alfred, specifying that her father was descended from "the Goths and Jutes…namely of Stuf and Whitgar two brothers…who…received possession of the Isle of Wight from their uncle King Cerdic". She is named as mother of King Alfred by Roger of Hoveden, who also names her father, specifying that he was "pincerna regis".
m [thirdly] ([Verberie-sur-Oise] 1 Oct 856) as her first husband, JUDITH of the Franks, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870). The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diaiadem on her head. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf. Her husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice according to Asser, who also says thahat the subservient position previously given to the queen was adopted in Wessex after the reign of King Beorhtric because of the unpopular influence of his queen Eadburh of Mercia. Queen Judith married secondly ([858/59]) her stepson, Æthelballd King of Wessex. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband. She eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanderss, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium".
[Mistress (1): ---. The uncertain nature of the precise relationship of King Æthelberht to the royal family is explained below, one of the possibilities being that he was an illegitimate son of King Æthelwulf by an unknown concubine.]
King Æthelwulf & his [first wife] had one child:
1. ÆTHELSTAN ([820/26]-[851/53]). The sources are contradictory concerning the parentage of Æthelstan. One manuscript of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle says that Æthelstan was the second son of King Ecgberht, but another says "Æthelwulf, son of Ecgberht, succeeded to the kingdom of Wessex, and he gave his son Æthelstan the kingdom of Kent and Essex and of Surrey and of Sussex". If Æthelstan was the son of King Æthelwulf, he must have been considerably older than his brothers, and therefore probably not born from the same mother. Æthelstan's birth date is estimated from his appointment as under king in 839, on the assumption that this was unlikely to have been before he was a teenager. Weir states that Æthelstan (whom she places as King Ecgberht's son) had a son named Ethelweard who was under-King of Kent and who died in 850, but the source on which this is based is not known. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Æthelstan was under-King of Kent, Surrey, Sussex aand Essex in 839. "Ethelstan/Æthelstan rex" subscribed three charters of King Æthelwulf granting lands in Kent dated 841, 842 and 845. "Edelstan rex Kancie" granted land at Rochester, Kent to "Ealhere princeps", jointly with King Æthelwulf, bby charter dated 850. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that he and his ealdorman Ealhere defeated a Danish force at sea off Sandwich [851]. Asser records that "king Athelstan, son of king Æthelwulf, and earl Ealhere slew a large army of pagans in Kent at…Sandwich" in 851, and that "earl Ealhere with the men of Kent" fought more pagans "in the island…Tenet" in 853 where Ælhere was killed. It is assumed that Æthelstan died before 853 as he is not named as having taken part in this second battle. Æthelstan had [one possible child]:
a) [ÆTHELWEARD (-850). Weirstates that Æthelstan (whom she places as King Ecgberht's son) had a son named Ethelweard who was under-King of Kent and who died in 850, but the primary source on which this is based is not known.]
King Æthelwulf & his [second] wife had [five] children:
2. ÆTHELBALD ([835/40]-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne Abbey, Dorset). "Edelbaldus filius suus" fought with King Æthelwulf at Temesmuthe, London and in Kent in 851. He was appointed under-king in Wessex when his father left for Rome in 855. Asser rrecords that "king Ethelbald and Ealstan bishop of…Sherborne, with Eanwulf earl of the district of Somerton are said to have made a conspiracy together that king Ethelwulf, on his return from Rome, should never again be received into his kingdom" and that "many ascribe [the plot] solely to the insolence of the king, because the king was pertinacious in this matter, and in many other perversities…as also was proved by the result of that which follows". After his return, Æthelwulf abdiccated part of his realm in favour of his son, who succeeded as ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, while his father continued to rule in the other part of Wessex and in Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex. Stenton says that Æthelwulf did this "to avoid a civiil war" after learning that "his eldest son and some of the leading men of Wessex were resolved that he should not be received as king" after returning to England. Presumably he bases this on the report by Asser. The new conclusions referred to below regarding the possible illegitimacy of King Æthelwulf's son Æthelberht suggest another possible explanation. Æthelberht, most likely older than his half-brother Æthelbald, may have been the ring-leader of the plot. King Æthelwulf may have wished to control Æthelberht's ambitions by installing his oldest legitimate son as king during his own lifetime. Asser's report blaming Æthelbald may have been due to the chronicler's evident disapproval of the king's marrying his stepmother after his father's death (see below). In fact, this rather surprising marriage may also have been motivated by the need to reinforce Æthelbald's possibly weak power-base in the face of a continuing threat from his more powerful older half-brother Æthelberht. "Adelbaldus ex occidentalium Saxonem" granted land at Teffont, Wiltshire to "Osmund minister" by charter dated 860, subscribed by (in order) "Iudith regis filius [sic]" and "Osric dux". The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the ddeath in 860 of King Æthelbald and his burial at Sherborne. m ([858/59], separated) as her second husband, his stepmother, JUDITH of the Franks, widow of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870). Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself". The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband. Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith. "Iudith regis filius [sic]" subscribed a charter of King Æthelbald dated 860. This presumably refers to Judith, Æthelbald's wife. Although it is not impossible that Queen Judith had a daughter by her first husband, her own date of birth indicates that it is unlikely that such a child could have been born before [858], in which case the daughter would probably not have been considered old enough to have subscribed a charter in 860. The "regis filius [=filia]" reference is nevertheless surprising (why not "regina"?), although one explanation is that it refers to her as daughter of the Frankish king rather than her relationship to the Wessex royal family. Another simpler explanation is that it was simply a copyist's error. The Annals of Winchester state that "by the admonition of St Swithun, Æthelbald repented of his incest and separated from his mother-in-law". The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith retuurned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year. Judith eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanders, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium".
3. ÆTHELSWITH ([838/41]-in Italy 888, bur Pavia). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Æthelwulf gave his (unnamed) daughter in marriage to King Burghred. Asser records that in 853 after Easter King Æthelwulf "gave his daughter to Burhred king of the Mercians…at the royal vill of Chippenham". Her name is confirmed by the charter of "Burgred rex Mercensium" dated 855 subscribed by "Æthelswith regina". It is assumed that Æthelswith was her father's legitimate daughter by his wife Osburga, but this is not certain. She was probably older than her brothers Æthelred and Alfred in view of her 853 marriage, although the possibility of an infant marriage cannot be excluded. Æthelswith had no known children from whose birth dates one could calculate their mother's age. "Æthelswith regina" was co-grantor with King Burgred in a grant of land at Upthrop to Wulflaf dated 869. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 888 "ealdorman Beocca and queen Æthelswith who was king Alfred's sister took the alms of the West Saxons and of king Alfred to Rome", one manuscript specifying that she "passed away on the way to Rome", another that she was buried in Pavia. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that she was buried "at Ticinum". m (Chippenham after Easter 853) BURGHRED King of Mercia, son of --- (-Rome after 874). He turned to Æthelwulf King of Wessex in 853 for help against the Britons of Wales, and was given his daughter in marriaiage. "Burgred rex Mercensium" granted lands to bishop Alhhun under charter dated 855, and was co-grantor with his wife in a grant of land at Upthrop to Wulflaf dated 869. The 855 charter shows that the Danes were in Mercia around the Wrekin in that year. King Burghred, in alliance with his brothers-in-law King Æthelred and Alfred of Wessex, gathered near Nottingham in 868 to fight the Danes but bought peace from them without fighting. However, the Danish army moved on Repton in late 873, and Burghred was forced out in 874. He left for Rome where he spent the rest of his life.
4. ÆTHELRED ([844/47]-after 15 Apr 871, bur Wimborne Minster, Dorset). Weir estimates that Æthelred must have been born in [840]. However, it is likely that he was no more than a young adolescent in 860, presumably not powerful enough to preveent his being displaced in the succession by his older half-brother Æthelberht. "Æthelred/Ethered filius regis" subscribed charters of King Æthelberht dated 860, 863 and 864. He succeeded his brother in 866 as ÆTHELRED I King of Wessex, crowned soon after at Kingston-upon-Thames. Danish incursions increased during his reign, Asser recording that the invaders wintered for the first time in East Anglia. King Æthelred and his younger brother Alfred allied themselves with their brotherer-in-law Burghred King of Mercia to fight the Danes near Nottingham in Autumn 868, but Burghred bought peace without fighting. In 870, the Danes moved against Wessex, establishing winter quarters at Reading. Following an unsuccessful attack oon Reading, Æthelred and Alfred defeated the Danes at Ashdown, but were themselves defeated at Basing in early 871. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 871 "after Easter" (dated to 15 Apr in 871, according to Cheney) of King Æthelred and his burial at Wimborne. m (868) WULFTHRYTH, daughter of --- ([848/53]-). "Wulfthryth regina" subscribed one of the two charters of King Æthelred I dated 868, which suggests that she married during that year. Her birth date range is estiimated from her having given birth to two known children before the death of her husband in 871. Her parentage is not known. However, the importance of Ealdorman Wulfhere's position at the court of King Æthelred I is shown by the position of hiis name among subscribers to the king's charters: he was first subscriber, even before the king's brother Alfred, in a charter dated 862, and second subscriber, after the queen, in a charter dated 868[1140]. It is tempting therefore to speculate that Æthelred's queen was Wulfthryth, daughter of Wulfhere Ealdorman & his wife ---, especially with the common use of the root "Wulf-" in their names. King Æthelred I & [his wife] had two children:
a) ÆTHELHELM ([868/70]-898). King Alfred, under his will probably dated to [879/88], bequeathed estates at Aldingbourne, Compton, Crondall, Beeding, Beddingham, Burnham, Thunderfield and Earhing to "my brother's son Æthelhelm". He is named in the will before his brother Æthelwold, and received more extensive estates, suggesting that Æthelhelm was his father's older son. "Æthelhel[m] dux" subscribed the same undated charter of King Alfred as his brother Æthelwald, although curiously Æthelhelm is not given the epithet "filius regis" in the charter, in contrast to Æthelwald. Æthelhelm had [one possible child]:
i) [ÆTHELFRITH (-904 or after). According to Anscombe, Æthelfrith was the son of Æthelhelm, son of Æthelred I King of England. However, this is unlikely to be correct from a chronological point of view. Any grandsons of King Æthelred could noot have been born before [890] at the earliest, while Ealdorman Æthelfrith was definitely active in 901, and even as early as 884 if the subscriptions of charters of that date refer to the same person. Kelly accepts that "the generations are too crowded" but does not analyse the impact of the chronology on the viability of the proposed descent. "Æthelferth ealdorman/dux/comes" and "Æthelfrith dux" subscribed two charters of Æthelred Ealdorman of Mercia in 884 and four charters of King Edward dated between 901 and 904. "Æthelfrith dux" was also granted land at Wrington, Somerset by King Edward under a charter dated 903.
b) ÆTHELWOLD ([869/71]-killed at the battle of the Holm [902/05][1146]). King Alfred, under his will probably dated to [879/88], bequeathed residences at Godalming, Guildford and Steyning to "my brother's son Æthelwold". He is named in the willl after his brother Æthelhelm and received fewer estates than his brother, suggesting that Æthelwold was his father's younger son. "Athelwald filius regis" subscribed a charter of King Alfred, undated, but the reference to his predecessor (King Æthelred I) as "regis" may indicate that it should be dated to the earliest years of King Alfred's reign, although after the birth of the king's son Edward whose name is listed among the subscribers immediately after Æthelwold. "Æthelwald dux/ealdorman" subscribed two charters of King Alfred dated 882 and 884, in the latter he was recorded first in the list of subscribers. An infant on the death of his father in 871, he was passed over for the succession in favour of his uncle Alfred. Florence of Worcester records that he challenged the succession of King Edward "the Elder" in 899, and occupied the royal estates at Wimborne and Christchurch. King Edward forced him to flee northwards, where he allied himself with the Danes of Northumbria. In 901, Æthelwold appeared in Essex with a fleet, and in 902 persuaded the army of the East Angles to undertake a great raid over English Mercia and northern Wessex. Florence of Worcester records that King Edward counter-atttacked, and Æthelwold was killed in battle. m ([899]) --- . The name of Æthelwold's wife is not known. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 899 "was the lady arrested whom he [Æthelwold] had abducted without the king's consent…because she had taken the vows of a nun". According to Florence of Worcester, Æthelwold married a nun from Wimborne, without King Edward's permission, and was forced to return her to the convent.
5. ÆLFRED (Wantage, Berkshire 849-26 Oct 899, bur Newminster Abbey, Winchester, transferred to Hyde Abbey, Winchester). Asser records the birth in 849 of Alfred, son of King Æthelwulf, at Wantage in Berkshire. He succeeded his brother in 871 as ALFRED King of Wessex.
6. [OSWEALD (-875 or after). "Oswald filius regis" subscribed a charter of King Æthelred I dated 868, listed immediately after "Ælfred filius regis" and before "Wulfthryth regina". If he was the son of King Æthelred, he would probably have been named before his uncle Alfred in this charter. It is more likely that Osweald was another son of King Æthelwulf, listed in the document after his older brother Alfred, although it is also possible that he was the son of either of King Æthelred's older brothers, King Æthelbald or King Æthelberht. The root "Os-" in his name suggests a connection with Osburga, the mother of Alfred. "Oswealdus filius regis…" subscribed a charter dated 875 under which Eardwulf granted property to Wighelm. It is interesting to note that this is not the only example where the son of a previous king continues to be referred to in charters as "filius regis" after the death of his father and succession of his brother. Presumably Osweald died soon after this date as no later record of him has been found.]
[King Æthelwulf had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):]
7. [ÆTHELBERHT ([830/35]-[865/66], bur Sherborne Abbey, Dorset). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names Æthelberht as king Æthelbald's brother when recording his succession in 860, and as the brother of Æthelred when recording the latter's succession in [865/66]. King Æthelberht's more uncertain relationship with the royal family is deduced from the will of King Alfred, probably dated to [879/88], which refers to the inheritance "which my father King Æthelwulf bequeathed to us three brothhers Æthelbald, Æthelred and myself" specifying that "Æthelred and I entrusted our share to our kinsman king Æthelberht on condition that he should return it to us…fully…and he then did so". This certainly suggests that Æthelberht could not have been the full brother of Æthelbald, Æthelred and Ælfred. There appear to be four possibilities to explain this unexpected wording and the precise family relationship between King Æthelberht and King Æthelwulf: (1) He was Æthelwulf's illegitimmate son by a concubine, although if this is correct it is not clear why Alfred would have used the imprecise word "kinsman" to refer to such a close relation as his half-brother; (2) he was related by blood more remotely, maybe the king's nephew through the male line by birth, but adopted by the king as his son and treated as such at court, in which case "brother" in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle should be interpreted as "adopted brother"; (3) he was the son of Osburga, King Æthelwulf's wwife, by an earlier marriage, and so was the uterine half-brother to Kings Æthelbald, Æthelred and Ælfred, although if this is correct it is unclear why he would have been appointed under-king in Kent in 855 (see below); (4) he was the legitimate son of King Æthelwulf by an earlier marriage, and therefore the king's oldest legitimate son, although if this is correct it is unclear why he would have been passed over when his father died in favour of King Æthelbald. None of these alternatives is obviously correct, although cases (1) and (2) appear somewhat more probable than (3), and (4) appears to be the least likely. Whatever the precise nature of Æthelberht's relationship to the family, it appears from King Alfred's will thhat the succession of Æthelberht as king was irregular in some way. Æthelberht's seniority, and probable position of power during the lifetime of King Æthelwulf, is demonstrated by "Æthelberht rex" subscribing Æthelwulf's charter dated 855 which granted land at Rochester, Kent to Dunn. From this, it has been concluded that he was appointed under-King in Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex around the time King Æthelwulf left for Rome in 855. However, this is puzzling, as it would imply that he was most senior of the potential heirs at the time, no mention being made in the records of any corresponding appointment for Æthelbald, despite the fact that, according to the will of Alfred, he was the oldest legitimate heir. Æthelberht's appointment in these territories must have been withdrawn at some stage, as King Æthelwulf himself governed Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex as part of the land which he allocated to himself under the arrangement for dividing the kingdom with his son Æthelbald after his return to England. A possible explanation for these difficulties is that Æthelberht was the ring-leader of the plot against King Æthelwulf during the latter's absence and therefore was disgraced after the king's return. The elevation of Æthelbald to the under-kingship at the time may therefore have been designed by King Æthelwulf to strengthen Æthelbald's position for eventual succession to the whole kingdom, at the expense of Æthelberht. The Anglo-Saxon CChronicle records that, after the death of Æthelwulf in 858, his "two sons succeeded to the kingdom: Æthelbald to Wessex and Æthelberht to Kent and to Essex and to Surrey and to Sussex". This would imply that some rehabilitation had taken place, assuming it is correct that he had been disgraced earlier, or that Æthelberht's position remained strong enough after his father's death to force Æthelbald to share the realm with him. "Æthelbearht rex" granted land in Kent to "Wulflaf ministter" by charter dated 858, subscribed by "Ethelmod dux". After Æthelbald's death in 860, Æthelberht succeeded to the whole kingdom as ÆTHELBERHT King of Wessex. If it is correct that Æthelberht was not a full brother of Æthelbald, he presumably displaced the latter's less powerful brothers Æthelred and Alfred, who would have been the rightful successors but who were probably both still minors at the time. "Athelbert rex" granted land at Dinton, Wiltshire to "Osmund minister" by charter dated 860, subscribed only by "Athelred filius regis". Danish incursions increased during the reign of Æthelberht, the largest Danish army yet landing in East Anglia in Autumn 865. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Æthelberht "reigned five years and his body lies at Sherborne", in a later passage that "Æthelred brother of Æthelberht" succeeded in 866.]”«s87» 
Æthelwulf King of Wessex (I11988)
 
223 “b.XXI s.492 Sammendrag: Engilbrikt Lavransson kunngjør vitnesbyrd av seg og av sin mor Gudrun
Åsgeirsdotter om herr Bents arvingers fiskerett i et varp som lå til garden
Hove (i Fåberg). Videre avlegges vitnesbyrd i denne saken av Bjørn Bjarnes-
son og Bergsvein Jonsson, som hadde bodd på Hove i 9 år og da hadde satt
garn i Glotten.
Kilde: Avskrift, nr. 67, i Ms. 4o nr. 255 i Universitetsbiblioteket, Oslo, utført1771 etter originalen av daværende sokneprest til Fåberg Ole Irgens. -Viktigere varianter i en avskrift med hånd g (se innledningen) i LangebeksDiplomatarium i Rigsarkivet, København, er angitt i merknadene.
Nummer: 651.
Dato: 1491. Sted: Hove.
Brevtekst (fra den trykte utgaven):
Ollum mannom som þeta breff se helder høyræ, sendher Engil-
brith Lafransson kwnnochtgerande, þeth jek sedess up a Hofwinæ
aff barndom, oc sath ek þ(e)r vi ar siden jek var gifth, medh fadher
min, oc ingen hørørdhæ jek lyctthæ sek in i þe halvæ varpon, som
lagæ til Hofvinæ, wttan Her Benthss Ervingæ. Jtem witner
oc1
min Modhr Gudrun Asgarssdottr, þeth hun tientæ Hustru Joran
hel i xl aar, oc fyldhæ Hennæ þ(e)r i warpomæ2, oc aldræ seges
hun vithæ, atath nokon gek i skiptæ medh Hustrunæ
herkiedh3 i
nedræ warpedh, heldhr øfræ, i halfth warpedh uttræ oc halth andræ
partæ austh. Jtem kiennes Jæk Biorn Biernæson oc Berswen
Jonsson4 þeth wi sethæ a Hofvinæ vel i IX ar, oc þa garnædhæ vii i
Glotteten halfannon tenæ oc halffannon Ervinganæ, oc ingen gek
i skiptæ medh oss uttom Her Benthss Ervingæ i þe halvæ Varpanæ.
Og til ytræ meræ sanindh her vm hengæ vi vor insiglæ for þetæ breff,
som skrividh var a Hofvinæ Ao Dni. MoCDXC primo.
 Tene kaldes endnu 1/4 af de fiske Nøter som bruges til Lage-
Silde-fangsten, men i dette her omtvistede fiskerie har kun været
brugt 3 Tener udi Noden
fnote ind 1 mangler i teksten.”«s50» 
ÅSGEIRSDTR, Gudrun (I10124)
 
224 “BAARD Guttormsson of Rein (-1194). Snorre names Bard as son of "Guthorm of Reine". Morkinskinna names “Guthormr at Rein” as father of “Bárdr, the father of King Ingi and Skúli jarl”. m firstly ULFHILD Palsdatter . m secondly (after 15 Jun 11184) as her second husband, CECILIA Sigurdsdotter, divorced wife of FOLKVID Lagmand in Värmland, illegitimate daughter of SIGURD Haraldsson "Mund" Joint King of Norway & his mistress --- (-1185). The Saga of King Sverre records that King Sverre arranged the marriage of "his sister Cecilia" to "Bard Guthormsson of Rein", dated from the context to just after the death of King Magnus [15 Jun 1184]. m thirdly RAGNDID Erlingsdotter . Baard & his second wife had one child:
a) INGE Baardsson (-23 Apr 1217). Morkinskinna names “Guthormr at Rein” as father of “Bárdr, the father of King Ingi and Skúli jarl”. Snorre names "Guthorm of Reine" as grandfather of "King Inge and Duke Skule", their father presumably being Baard although this is not stated in this passage. King of the Birkebeiner. Inge had one illegitimate child by GYRITH, daughter of ---:
i) GUTTORM Ingesson (1205/6-1223/35).
Baard & his third wife had six children:
b) SIGURD Baardsson .
c) ARNULF Baardsson .
d) GUTTORM Baardsson .
e) SKULI Baardsson (-1249). Morkinskinna names “Guthormr at Rein” as father of “Bárdr, the father of King Ingi and Skúli jarl”. Snorre names "Guthorm of Reine" as grandfather of "King Inge and Duke Skule", their father presumably being Baard although this is not stated in this passage. Duke of Norway, he was a contender for the Norwegian throne in 1239. m RAGNHILD, daughter of ---. Skuli & his wife had three children:
i) MARGARETA (-1270). "Skule jarll broder Inga konongs" and "Hakon kongr" donated property to St Olav's church, Nidaros by charter dated 29 Sep 1225 which names "Margrettar dottor". m (25 May 1225) HAAKON Haakonsson King of Norway, illegitimate son of HAAKON Sverkersson King of the Birkebeiner & his mistress Inge --- (posthumously 1204-[5/16] Dec 1263).
ii) INGERID (-1232). m (1227) KNUD Haakonsson King of the Ribbunger, son of Jarl HAAKON Galin & his wife Kristin Nikolasdatter (-1261).
iii) RAGNRID (-after 1247).
Skuli had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
iv) PETER (-1240).
f) SIGRID . Morkinskinna records that “Sigridr, the sister of King Ingi Bárdarson” married “Jón”, son of “Sigurdr Austrátt, a district chieftain”, who was the son of “Kári King´s brother and [his wife] Borghildr the daughter of Dag Eilífsson”. m firstly (1206) THORGRIM of Ljanes (-1206). m secondly JON Sigurdsson of Osteraat, son of SIGURD Austratt & his wife --- (-1214).
g) INGEBORG . m ALF von Thornberg.”


“Bård married Cecilia Sigurdsdatter, daughter of King Sigurd II Munn 'mouth' Haraldsson and Gunhild Fra Sylte, about 1184 in Norway. (Cecilia Sigurdsdatter was born about 1155 in Norway and died about 1185 in Rein, Rissa, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway.)”«s48», «s87» 
GUTTORMSSØN PÅ REIN, Bård (I9498)
 
225 “BALDWIN FitzGilbert de Clare (-[1154]). The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Baldwinus filius Gisleb" for "terra Willi de Rullos cum filia Ric fratris sui" in Lincolnshire. “Adeliz, uxor Gilberti filii Ricardi, et Gillebertus et Walterus et Baldewinunus et Rohaisia pueri Gilberti” donated property to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “Gilberto filio Gilberti, Galterio, Hervæo, Baldwino fratribus eius et Rohaisia sorore eorum”. The order of the names of the witnesses in thihis charter is curious. “Hervæo” was presumably the donor´s son by her second marriage. If that is correct, it is unclear why the name “Baldwino” follows, as other sources confirm that Baldwin was the donor´s son by her first marriage. Another curious point is that Baldwin´s name is not included in the family list in the Liber Vitæ of Thorney abbey: "…Gilebt fili[us] Ricardi, Ricard fili[us] eius…Aaliz uxor Gilbti filii Ricardi, Comes Gilbt, Galteri…filii sui…Rohais, Auiza, Margareta, Aaliz nate sue…". Is it possible that Baldwin was his father´s illegitimate son, not born to his marriage to Adelisa de Clermont? Lord of Bourne, Lincolnshire. A charter of King Edward III confirmed donations to Bourn Priory, among which ddonations by “Baldevinus filius Gisleberti” with the consent of “filio meo Rogero et uxore mea Adhelina”. m (before 1130) ADELINA de Rollos, daughter of RICHARD de Rollos & his wife Emma ---. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Baldwinus filius Gisleb" for "terra Willi de Rullos cum filia Ric fratris sui" in Lincolnshire. A charter of King Edward III confirmed donations to Bourn Priory, among which donations by “Baldevinus filius Gisleberti” with the consent of “filio meo Rogero et uxore mea Adhelina”. Baldwin & his wife had four children.”«s87» FITZGILBERT DE CLARE, Baldwin (I14646)
 
226 “BALDWIN Wake (-before Nov 1198). "Hugo Wac" founded the abbey of Longues, for the souls of "Bauduini filii Gillberti et Emmæ filiæ eius uxoris meæ et…liberorum meorum Balduini et Gaufridi, et aliorum", by charter dated 1168. Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Longues, including donations by "Hugonis Wac et Baldewini filii sui" and "terram de Gernerui [Guernsey?] quam habuit Gaufridus Wac", by charter dated to [1185/89]. “Baldewinus Wac” confirmed ddonations to Depyng priory, Lincolnshire by “avus meus Baldwinus filius Gilberti et pater meus Hugo Wac” by undated charter. "Baudouin de Wac" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie-de-Longues by undated charter, witnessed by "Roger Wac"". "Jordano de Humetis, Ricardo de Humetis, Baudewino Wac…Bartholomeo de Mortuo mari..:Willelmo de Sae, Henrico de Humetis fratre suo…" witnessed the charter dated to the late 12th century under which "Lucia de Humetis" donated revenue from land at Bradecroft, near Stamford to Southwick priory, Lincolnshire. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Baldewinus Wac" paying "ci s iii d" in Lincolnshire. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "Baldewinus Wac" paying "x l ii s vi d" in Lincolnshire. A charter of King Edward III confirmed donations to Bourn Priory, among which a confirmation by “Emma Wac filia Baldwini” of a donation by “Hugo Wac, assensu conjugis suæ Emmæ…[et] filio suo Baldewino”[811]. m (before 1189) as her first husband, AGNES du Hommet, daughter of WILLIAM du Hommet & his wife Lucy --- (-before 12 Nov 1223). King John confirmed "terra de Wichenson [Winchendon, Buckinghamshire] q Willelmus de Humet pater suus dedit ei in maritagium per manu H. Reg patris nostri" to "Agneti Wak" by order dated 23 Mar 1207. The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Agnes Wake" holding "medietatem de Winchende" in Buckinghamshire iin [1210/12]. Bracton records a claim, dated 1221, by "abbas de Nutelegha" against "Agnetem Wace" for "medietatem manerii de Winchendona" which she said "Willelmus de Humet pater suis dedit ei in maritagium". The Testa de Nevill includes a list of landholdings in Lincoln, dated 1219, which includes "Agnes Wach est de donacione domini regis; terra eius valet xx.l". She married secondly Ranulph de Vernay. An order dated 12 Nov 1223 relates to payment of the fine made by "Ranulf de Vernay", while Agnes was still alive, for marrying "Agnes Wake…without the licence…of the king". Baldwin & his wife had one child.”«s87» WAKE, Baldwin (I14641)
 
227 “Baptisms in Bergen” on web site lists this entry. Confirmed in church records.

Baptisms in Bergen:
Year: 1863
Date of Birth: Jan 31
Baptism: Mar 01
Name: Marthe Helene
Father’s occupation: Arbejdsmand
Father’s given name: Helge
Father’s last name: Olsen
Home: 10-59
Mother’s given name: Marthe
Mother’s last name: Asgrimsdatter
Congregation: Domkirken

Confirmation Record: Church Book: Bergen Domkirken 1874-1880:
Confirmation Date: 28 Apr 1878
Name: Marte Helene Olsen
Birthdate: 31 Jan 1861
Birthplace: Domk. Sogn.
Father: Arbeidsmand Helge Olsen
Mother: K. Marte Asgrimsdatter

Emigrant Records for Bergen show that on Sept. 4, 1885, Helene Helgesen, unmarried and born in 1863, 22 years old, from Bergen, emigrated to America on the Cunard Linie. No passenger arrival record has been located for Helene Helgesen. A Canadian Immigrant Record for Martha Olsen, indicated her arrival in 1885 into the Port of Halifax, arriving on the "Sarmatian". (National Archives of Canada: Microfilm Reel No. C-4512 page 10). Unable to confirm if this individual' is a match).

Her name is listed as Helena Hoitomt in the 1900 U.S. Federal Census.

Burial Record: Lakewood Cemetery:
Helen Hoitomt
Age 41
Date of Death: 08/27/1904
Place of Death: Unavailable
Disposition Date: 08/30/1904
Site ID: 459-12-3

This burial plot was purchased by Helen Espen in June 1896 for the burial of Nels Espen.

From: “The Minneapolis Journal, August 29, 1904” under column “Necrological::
Mrs. Helen Hoyton [sic] died Saturday evening at her residence, 262 Nineteenth Ave. S, at the age of 41 years. Funeral tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. from the residence. Interment at Lakewood.”

From The Minneapolis Journal (Minneapolis, Minnesota) 10 Nov. 1903, Tue.
"The Unhappily Tied
Prayers of Four Such for Divorces are Granted:
…Helen Hoitomt from Carl Haitomt, drunkenness and cruelty… 
HELGESEN, Marthe Helene “Helen or Lena” (I852)
 
228 “Bård Sigurdson på Torsnes lever den 1410 lever den 1446.
n. 1410-1446.

Baard Sigurdssøn paa Torsnes, nævnes 1410, 1421 og 1446, hadde sit fornavn efter sin mor, der var søster av Svein Baardssøn paa Norheim (D.N. IV 781, VIII 265, V 738). Baard og Gyrid efterlot kun to døtre Herborg og Gyrid Baardsdøtre, som i 1497 med sine barn skifter det store jordegods efter forældrene.”«s45» 
SIGURDSSON GALTE PÅ TORSNES, Bård (I9354)
 
229 “BAUDOUIN ([865/67]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Gent, St Pieter). He is named as second of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He succceeded his father in 879 as BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders. From his succession, he was under great pressure from the raids of the Vikings, and took refuge in the marshes of Saint-Omer in 883. He expanded his territories by occupying the pagi of Mempisc, Courtrai and the Ijzer, seizing control of the counties of Ternois and Boulonnais after 892, and the Tournaisis (except for the town of Tournai). Although Count Baudouin at first supported the election of Eudes King of France in 888, the latter opposed the count's becoming lay-abbot of St Bertin (in 892, in succession to abbot Rudolf) and pursued him to Bruges, although the king was unable to capture the town. The Annales Vedastini record the death "Non Ian 8922" of "Rodulfus abba", that "castellani Egfridum comitem" was sent to announce the news to the king, and that in his absence "Balduinum a Flandris…per consilium Evreberti qui nimis fuerat versutissimus" seized the abbacy against the wishes of the king who had promised it to Egfrid. The Annales Vedastini record that "Balduinus" captured Artois in 892. Count Baudouin supported the coronation of Charles III "le Simple" as king of the West Franks in 895, but changed sides and supported ZZwentibold Duke of Lotharingia. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold in 895. He invaded Péronne in 899, attacked Vermandois, Artois and Boulogne, but was driven out of Vermandois by 900 although he reconquered it and killed Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in revenge for the death of his brother Raoul. Count Baudouin also controlled the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin. The Annales Blandininienses record the death in 918 of "Balduvinus comes", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinio". His territories were divided between his two sons on his death. m ([893/99]) ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex, daughter of ALFRED King of Wessex & his wife Ealhswith of the Gainas ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Ghent, St Pieter). "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden, third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin without giving her origin. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "filia Edgeri regis Anglorum, nomine Elferudem" as the wife of "Balduinus Calvus", although "Edgeri" is clearly an error ffor "Alfredi". This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest in preventing Viking settlements along the coast. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "filia regis Elftrudis comitissa". The Memorial of "Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii". Count Baudouin II & his wife had [five] children:
a) ARNOUL de Flandres (after [893/99]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Ghent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus". He succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders and Artois.
b) ADALOLF [Æthelwulf] de Flandres (after [893/99]-13 Nov 933, bur Ghent St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus". "Adalolphus" is named son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as Comte de Boulogne-sur-Mer, de Thérouanne, and lay-Abbot of St Bertin[74]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 933 of "Adalulfus comes", specifying that he was buried "in monasterio sancti Petri".
c) EALSWID de Flandres. "Ealhswid" is named daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard.
d) ERMENTRUDE de Flandres. "Earmentruth" is named daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard.
e) [---. No information has been found concerning this fifth possible child of Count Baudouin II. If "avunculus" is used in its strict sense in the source cited below, the child was a daughter. However, it is possible that "avunculus" was useed informally as the counterpart of "nepos", the latter being much less precise and possibly indicating a more remote blood relationship. If Abbot Hildebrand's mother was the sister of Count Arnoul, it is possible that she was the same person as either Ealswid or Ermentrude. No information has been found concerning the possible husband of such a daughter. m ---.] One child:
i) [HILDEBRAND (-after 961). Arnulf Count of Flanders was "avunculus Hildebrandi abbas" according to the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini also records "Hildebrandus…avunculo suo comite Arnulfo". Abbé de Saint-Bertin et de Saint-Vaast. The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin names "Hildebrando nepos suus [Widdonem abbas]", specifying that he succeeded Guido as abbot[80]. No other information has been found to enable a more precise relationship to be identified either between Count Arnoul and Abbot Hildebrand or between Abbot Hildebrand and Abbot Guido.]”

From Wikipedia:
“Baldwin II (c. 865 – September 10, 918), nicknamed Calvus (the Bald) was the second count of Flanders. He was also hereditary abbot of St. Bertin from 892 till his death. He was the son of Baldwin I of Flanders and Judith, a daughter of Charles the Bald.
The early years of Baldwin's rule were marked by a series of devastating Viking raids. Little north of the Somme was untouched. Baldwin recovered, building new fortresses and improving city walls, and taking over abandoned property, so that in the end he held far more territory, and held it more strongly, than had his father. He also took advantage of the conflicts between Charles the Simple and Odo, Count of Paris to take over the Ternois and the Boulonnias.
In 884 Baldwin married Ælfthryth (Ælfthryth, Elftrude, Elfrida), a daughter of King Alfred the Great of England. The marriage was motivated by the common Flemish-English opposition to the Vikings, and was the start of an alliance that was a mainstay of Flemish policy for centuries to come.
In 900, he tried to curb the power of Archbishop Fulk of Rheims by assassinating him, but he was excommunicated by Pope Benedict IV.
He died at Blandimberg and was succeeded by his eldest son Arnulf I of Flanders. His younger son Adalulf was (the first) count of Boulogne.
He married Ælfthryth, a daughter of Alfred the Great, King of England. They had the following:
-Arnulf I of Flanders (c. 890-964), married Adela of Vermandois
-Adalulf (c. 890-933), Count of Boulogne
-Ealswid
-Ermentrud
His fifth child however, was illegitimate.
-Albert (d. 977)”«s87» 
Baldwin II Count of Flanders (I11994)
 
230 “BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090). He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered. Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders. After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon. Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb. m ALBERADE, daughter of [MAUGER Vicomte de Costentin]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”. Baudouin & his wife had six children:
i) ROBERT (-after Dec 1101). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy. The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont. He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096.
ii) WILLIAM (-1096). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis. He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.
iii) RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Ford Abbey). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the childrdren of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”. He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless.
iv) ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Ford Abbey, Devon). The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardidi…ducis Normanniæ”. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford”. m ---. One child:
(a) ALICE . The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ”[504]. m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---. Randulph & his wife had one child:
(1) MAUD Avenell (-21 Sep 1173). The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” had “unicam filiam…Matildam” who died. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua…unicam filiam…Matildam” married “Roberto filio regis Henrici primi notho” after the death of her first husband “Roberto de Abrincis id est de Averinges”, and died “IX Kal Oct 1173”. m firstly ROBERT d´Avranches, son of [WILLIAM FitzWimund d´Avranches & his wife --- (-before 1142). m secondly (1142) ROBERT, illegitimate son of HENRY I King of England & his mistress Edith of Greystoke (-1 Jun 1172).
v) EMMA . Guillaume de Jumièges records that Baudouin had three daughters but does not name them. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m HUGH de Waft .
vi) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that Baudouin had three daughters but does not name them.
Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
vii) WIGER (-[1133]). Named as bastard son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he became a monk at Bec living there for about 40 years under abbots William and Boso.”«s87» 
DE BRIONNE, Baudouin (I14311)
 
231 “BAUDOUIN de Flandres ([940]-Abbey of St Bertin 1 Jan 962). His parentage is specified in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He ruled with his father from 958 as BAUDOUIN III Joint Count of Flanders and Artois, his father granting him the administration of the south of the country. The Annales Blandinienses record the deaths in 962 of "Baldwinus, filius Arnulfi marchisi, et soror eius Liutgardis". The Annales Egmundani record the death in 962 of "Baldwinus filius Arnulfi marchisi Flanandrensium". m ([951/59]) as her first husband, MECHTILD of Saxony, daughter of HERMANN Billung Duke in Saxony & his [first/second] wife [Oda ---/Hildesuit ---] ([942]-Ghent 25 May 1008, bur Ghent St Peter). "Mathilda Saxonici generic" is named wife of Count Baudouin in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bennonis ducis, qui et Bernhardus et Liudigeri comitis et Machtildis comitisse" as brothers and sister of "domna Suanehildis [filia] Herimanni ducis de Liuniburh", recording the names of Mechtild's two husbands. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Mathildis, filiam principis Herimanni" as wife of "Balduinum [filius comitis Arnulfi]", specifying that it was hoped the couple would have many children. This suggests that their marriage date may have been some years earlier than 961 considering that the Genealogia was supposedly compiled in [951/59], probably during the earlier part of this date range considering which children of Louis IV King of the West Franks are named in the document. She married secondly ([963]) Godefroi Comte de Verdun [Wigeriche] (-3/4 Sep after 995, bur Gent St Peter). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Mathildis comitissa Saxonie" as wife of "Godefridi Ardennensis". The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1008 of "Mathildis comitissa". The Necrology of Lüneburg records the death "25 May" of "Mattild com". Baudouin III & his wife had one child:
a) ARNOUL de Flandre ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Ghent). The Annales Elnonenses Minores records "Arnulfus, filius Balduini ex Matilde" succeeding his grandfather in 964 as ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders.
Baudouin III had one possible illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:
b) [ALBERIC [Albert] ([960/62]-1018). The Gesta Episcoporum Camerancensium name "Azelinus, de Truncinis villa, Balduini Flandrensium comitis de concubina filius", specifying that he was later appointed Bishop of Paris, in the passage recording the succession of "Erluinus" as Bishop of Cambrai (in 995). Bishop of Paris 1016-1018. According to the Dictionnaire de Biographie Française, "Albert" was provost at Tronchiennes 951-977 but this is chronologically impossible assuming this refers to the same person. If the information about his paternity is correct, Baudouin III is the only count of that name in Flanders who could have been his father. Another possibility is that the chronicle was in error and that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Baudouin IV Count of Flanders, who was count at the time the text was written but who would have been too young to have been Alberic's father.]”

From Wikipedia:
“ Baldwin III of Flanders The Young (940 – January 1, 962) was count of Flanders together with his father Arnulf I.
He died before his father and was succeeded by his infant son Arnulf II, with his father acting as regent until his own death.
Arnulf I had made Baldwin co-ruler in 958. During his short rule, Baldwin established the weaving and fulling industry in Ghent thus laying the basis for the economical importance of the county in the centuries to come.
In 961 Baldwin married Mathilde Billung of Saxony, daughter of Herman, Duke of Saxony, by whom he had a son and heir Arnulf II.”«s87» 
Baldwin III Count of Flanders (I12662)
 
232 “BAUDOUIN, son of [ODACRE [Audacer or Odoscer] & his wife ---] ([830/37]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer). The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana, dated to the second decade of the 12th century, names "Balduinum Ferreueum" as son of "Audacer". The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "Balduinum Ferreum" as son of "Audacer". He is named as son of Audacer in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which records his year of deatath and place of burial. His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adult at the time of his marriage, which means that he must have been a child when his father died. He eloped with his future wife around Christmamas 861. The Annales Blandinienses name "Baldwinum Ferreum filium Audacri" and "Balduvinus filius Audacri" when recording (respectively) his elopement with his wife in 862 and his death in 879. He was granted the “pagus Flandrensis” in 863, and shortly after Ternois, Waas and the lay abbacy of St Pieter of Gent, although the primary sources on which this is based have not yet been identified. He is known to history as BAUDOUIN I “der Gute/Ferreus/der Eisenarme” Count of Flanders, but it is improbable that he was referred to as such by contemporaries. An agreement dated 14 Jun 877 of Emperor Charles II "le Chauve", presumably written with his own death in mind, names "…ex comitibus aut Tedericus, aut Balduinus, sive Chuonrradus, seu Adalelmus" as those willing to support the emperor's son. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 879 of "Balduvinus, filius Audacri", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinie". According to legend, he built the church of St Donatien ("Sint Donaatskapittel") at Bruges.
m (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) as her third husband, JUDITH, widow firstly of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex and secondly of ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks [Carolingian] & his first wife Ermentrude [d'Orléléans] ([844]-after [870]). She is named as wife of Baudouin in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which also names her parents and her three sons. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf. Asser records that "Iuthittam, Karoli Francorum regis filiam" married "Æthelbald filius eius [=Æthelwulfo rege]" after the death of her first husband, commenting that it was "cum magna ab omnibus audienentibus infamia". Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium". The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that Judith married "Balduinus comes". The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage in 862 of "Balduinus, Odacri filius" and "Iudith, Caroli regis filiam". The preceding information is pulled together by the Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ which names "Iudith vidua Adelbaldi regis Anglorum, filia Karoli Calvi regis Francorum" as the wife of "Balduinum Ferreum". No information has been found in the primary sources so far consulted which throws light on the possible date of death of Judith, although it is unlikely that she died before about 870 at the earliest assuming that she was the mother of all the children referred to below.
Count Baudouin I & his wife had [five] children:
1. CHARLES ([864/65]-young). "Karolus brevis vite" is named as first of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin.
2. BAUDOUIN ([865/67]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Gent, St Pieter). He is named as second of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He succeeded his father in 879 as BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve" Count of Flanders. From his succession, he was under great pressure from the raids of the Vikings, and took refuge in the marshes of Saint-Omer in 883. He expanded his territories by occupying the pagi of Mempisc, Courtrai and the Ijzer, seizing control of the counties of Ternois and Boulonnais after 892, and the Tournaisis (except for the town of Tournai). Although Count Baudouin at first supported the election of Eudes King of France in 888, the latter opposed the count's becoming lay-abbot of St Bertin (in 892, in succession to abbot Rudolf) and pursued him to Bruges, although the king was unable to capture the town. The Annales Vedastini record the death "Non Ian 892" of "Rodulfus abba", that "castellani Egfridum comitem" was sent to announce the news to the king, and that in his absence "Balduinum a Flandris…per consilium Evreberti qui nimis fuerat versutissimus" seized the abbacy against the wishes of the king who had promised it to Egfrid. The Annales Vedastini record that "Balduinus" captured Artois in 892. Count Baudouin supported the coronation of Charles III "le Simple" as king of the West Franks in 895, but changed sides and supported ZZwentibold Duke of Lotharingia. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold in 895. He invaded Péronne in 899, attacked Vermandois, Artois and Boulogne, but was driven out of Vermandois by 900 although he reconquered it and killed Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in revenge for the death of his brother Raoul. Count Baudouin also controlled the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin. The Annales Blandininienses record the death in 918 of "Balduvinus comes", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinio". His territories were divided between his two sons on his death. m ([893/99]) ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex, daughter of ALFRED King of Wessex & his wife Ealhswith of the Gainas ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Ghent, St Pieter). "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden, third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin without giving her origin. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "filia Edgeri regis Anglorum, nomine Elferudem" as the wife of "Balduinus Calvus", although "Edgeri" is clearly an error ffor "Alfredi". This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest in preventing Viking settlements along the coast. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "filia regis Elftrudis comitissa". The Memorial of "Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii". Count Baudouin II & his wife had [five] children:
a) ARNOUL de Flandres (after [893/99]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Ghent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus". He succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders and Artois.
b) ADALOLF [Æthelwulf] de Flandres (after [893/99]-13 Nov 933, bur Ghent St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus". "Adalolphus" is named son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as Comte de Boulogne-sur-Mer, de Thérouanne, and lay-Abbot of St Bertin[74]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 933 of "Adalulfus comes", specifying that he was buried "in monasterio sancti Petri".
c) EALSWID de Flandres. "Ealhswid" is named daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard.
d) ERMENTRUDE de Flandres. "Earmentruth" is named daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard.
e) [---. No information has been found concerning this fifth possible child of Count Baudouin II. If "avunculus" is used in its strict sense in the source cited below, the child was a daughter. However, it is possible that "avunculus" was useed informally as the counterpart of "nepos", the latter being much less precise and possibly indicating a more remote blood relationship. If Abbot Hildebrand's mother was the sister of Count Arnoul, it is possible that she was the same person as either Ealswid or Ermentrude. No information has been found concerning the possible husband of such a daughter. m ---.] One child:
i) [HILDEBRAND (-after 961). Arnulf Count of Flanders was "avunculus Hildebrandi abbas" according to the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini also records "Hildebrandus…avunculo suo comite Arnulfo". Abbé de Saint-Bertin et de Saint-Vaast. The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin names "Hildebrando nepos suus [Widdonem abbas]", specifying that he succeeded Guido as abbot[80]. No other information has been found to enable a more precise relationship to be identified either between Count Arnoul and Abbot Hildebrand or between Abbot Hildebrand and Abbot Guido.]
3. RAOUL ([867/70]-murdered 17 Jun 896). "Rodolphus Cameracensis comes" is named as third of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. The Annales Blandinienses records "Rodulfus comes et abba factus est" in 882. The date when he was installed as Comte de Cambrai is not known. However, his brother Baudouin II Count of Flanders supported the election of Eudes King of France in 888, and it is suggested that Raoul's appointment must have taken place around that time. Baudouin quarrelled with King Eudes over the succession to the lay abbacy of Saint-Bertin in 892, so it is unlikely that the king would have favoured members of the count's family with a comital appointment after this episode. He supported his brother's attack on the county of Vermandois, captured Arras, Saint-Quentin and Péronne after 5 Jan 892, but was captured by Héribert I Comte de Vermandois and killed. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold of Lotharingia in 895. The History of Waulsort monastery records that "Cameracensis comes Rodulfus…regalis consanguinitatis" invaded the territory of "quatuor Heriberti filios" with the consent of "rege Francorum…avunculo suo" but was expulsed, but this confuses Raoul, son of Baudouin I, with Comte Raoul [II] de Gouy (see NORTHERN FRANCE). The Annales Vedastini record that "Rodulfus comes" disrupted the peace in 896 and took the property of "Heribertus et Erkingerus", that "Odo rex" besieged "castrum sancti Quintini et Peronam" and expelled Raoul's supporters, and that Heribert killed Raoul. The Annales Blandinienses record that "Rodulfus comes" was killed "IV Kal Iul 896". m ---. The name of the wife of Comte Raoul is not known.
a) [--- de Cambrai . According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Isaac was married to a daughter of Raoul but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. It is possible that it is based on speculation designed to explain the transmission of the county between the two individuals. m ISAAC Comte de Cambrai, son of --- (-[946/30 Apr 948]).]
4. [daughter . m ---.]
a) [GAUTHIER . The History of Waulsort monastery names "Walterus…Rodulfi sororis filius" recording that he attempted to avenge the death of his maternal uncle. No other reference to this person has been found and, because the History of Waulsort monastery is such a confused source, his existence should be treated with caution.]
5. [GUNHILD [Guinidilde] (-before 19 Feb 904). According to Weir, the wife of Guifré I Conde de Barcelona was Gunhild, daughter of Baudouin I Count of Flanders. It is assumed that this is based on the Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium which records that Charles II "le Chauve" King of the Franks gave an unnamed daughter of the (unnamed) Count of Flanders in marriage to "Pilosi" at the same time as granting him the county of Barcelona, although this source is unreliable in some points of detail concerning the family of the counts of Barcelona. Considering that the early counts of Flanders were in 877 still in the process of consolidating their position in their newly founded county, it is not clear what contact they would have had with a count whose territory was so distant from their own sphere of activity, or the advantages they would have seen in such a dynastic marriage. The only known point in common between the two counts appears to have been that King Charles III "le Chauve" was suzerain of both. Gunhild is not shown among the children of Count Baudouin in Rösch. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. A charter of her daughter Emma dated 19 Feb 904 specifies that her mother was dead. m (877) GUIFRE "el Velloso/el Pilós/the Hairy" Conde de Barcelona, son of SUNIFREDO de Carcassonne, Count in the March of Spain & his wife Ermentrude (-killed in battle shortly after 21 Aug 897).]”

From Wikipedia:
“Baldwin I (probably born 830s, died 879), also known as Baldwin Iron Arm (the epithet is first recorded in the 12th century), was the first count of Flanders.
Baldwin was the son of a certain Audacer, about whom nothing definite is known; his legendary origins are rejected by modern scholarship. At the time Baldwin first appears in the records he was already a count, presumably in the area of Flandersrs, but this is not known. Count Baldwin rose to prominence when he eloped with princess Judith, daughter of Charles the Bald, king of West Francia. Judith had previously been married to Ethelwulf and his son (from an earlier marriage) Ethelbald, kings of Wessex, but after the latter's death in 860 she had returned to France.
Around Christmas 861, at the instigation of Baldwin and with her brother Louis' consent Judith escaped the custody she had been put under in the city of Senlis after her return from England. She fled north with Count Baldwin. Charles had given no permission for a marriage and tried to capture Baldwin, sending letters to Rorik of Dorestad and Bishop Hungar, forbidding them to shelter the fugitive.
After Baldwin and Judith had evaded his attempts to capture them, Charles had his bishops excommunicate the couple. Judith and Baldwin responded by traveling to Rome to plead their case with Pope Nicholas I. Their plea was successful and Charles was forced to accept. The marriage took place on 13 December 863 in Auxerre. By 870 Baldwin had acquired the lay-abbacy of St. Pieter in Ghent and is assumed to have also acquired the counties of Flanders and Waas, or parts thereof by this timme. Baldwin developed himself as a very faithful and stout supporter of Charles and played an important role in the continuing wars against the Vikings. He is named in 877 as one of those willing to support the emperor's son, Louis the Stammerer. During his life Baldwin expanded his territory into one of the major principalities of Western Francia, he died in 879 and was buried in the Abbey of Saint-Bertin, near Saint-Omer.
Baldwin was succeeded by his son by Judith, Baldwin II (c. 866 - 918). The couple's first son was named Charles after his maternal grandfather, but he died young. His third son Raoul (Rodulf) (c. 869 - murdered 896) became Count of Cambrai around 888, but he and his brother joined king Zwentibold of Lotharingia in 895. In 896 they attacked Vermandois and captured Arras, Saint-Quentin and Peronne, but later that year Raoul was captured by count Heribert and killed.”«s87» 
Baldwin I Count of Flanders (I12666)
 
233 “BAUDOUIN, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille St Pierre). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "Balduinum Insulanum" as son oof "Balduinum Barbatum [et] Odgivam". After 1028, he led a rebellion against his father who was forced to take refuge in Normandy. After his father returned with reinforcements, Baudouin submitted but was allowed to rule jointly. He succeededed his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders. He acquired overlordship of the county of Lens from the counts of Boulogne. He was installed as count in the march of Antwerp, presumably after the death of Gozelon iin 1044. He took part in the Lotharingian rebellion against Emperor Heinrich III, sacking the palace at Nijmegen. Emperor Heinrich gathered a large army to wreak revenge in 1049, but in practical terms the only loss to Flanders was the march of Antwerp. Count Baudouin returned Valenciennes to Hainaut, and thus indirectly to German suzerainty. He maintained close relations with Godwin Earl of Wessex, first sheltering his son Svein after the latter was outlawed in 1049, then Earl Godwin himself on his exile in 1051. Emperor Heinrich III invaded Flanders again in 1054 but had to retreat. On the death of Henri I King of France in 1060, Count Baudouin became regent of France for his nephew King Philippe I. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1067 of "Baldwinus potentissimus marchisus".
m (Amiens 1028) ADELA de France, daughter of ROBERT II King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles (1009-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Rodberti regis Francorum Adelam" wife of "Balduinum Insulanum". The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" the daughter of King Robert[191]. Corbie was her dowry[192]. She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa".
Count Baudouin V & his wife had three children:
1. BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([1030]-Hanson Abbey 17 Jul 1070). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"=. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names (in order) "Balduinum sextum, Robertum cognomento Fresonem, Philippum patrem Guilelmi de Ypra et filias duas Iudith, quam duxit Tostinus comes NNortdanimbronum in Anglia et Mathilda…Normannorum ducissa"=, which confuses three generations of the family of the counts of Flanders. Baudouin's father sent him to be educated at the court of Emperor Heinrich III, who installed him as MarkGraaaf van Antwerpen in 1045, although this was taken away in [1050] after his father opposed the emperor=. He succeeded in 1055 as BAUDOUIN I Comte de Hainaut, by right of his wife. He succeeded his father in 1067 as BAUDOUIN VI Count of Flanders. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1070 of "Baldwinus marchisus, qui Hasnoni sepultus est"=. The Annales Elnonenses Maiores record Baudouin's death "XVI Kal Aug" and his burial "Hasnonie"=. m (1051) as her second husband, RICHILDE, widow of HERMAN Comte de Hainaut, daughter of --- (-Messines 15 Mar 1087, bur Abbaye de Hasnon). The question of the parentage of Richilde is discussed fully in the document HAINAUT which sets out her first husband's family. Richilde married thirdly (1070) as his second wife, Guillaume FitzOsbern Earl of Hereford. This third marriage is shown in the Complete Peerage, which cites Annales Flandriæ stating that Richilde was taken in the battle where her new husband FitzOsbern was killed=. Count Baudouin VI & his wife had three children:
a) ARNOUL de Flandre ([1055]-killed in battle Cassel 22 Feb 1071, bur Saint-Bertin). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Arnulfum et Balduinem" as sons of "Balduinum Haanoniensem [et] Richelde". "Arnulfum nepotem suum [Robertus filius Balduini comitis Insulani] occiso" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He succeeded his father in 1070 as ARNOUL III Count of Flanders, Comte de Hainaut. His uncle Robert rebelled against Count Arnoul, defeated him at the battle of Cassel where Arnoul was killed, and seized control of Flanders. Arnoul's younger brother Baudouin was left only with the county of Hainaut.
b) BAUDOUIN de Flandre ([1056]-on Crusade 1098, after 8 Jun). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Arnulfum et Balduinem" as sons of "Balduinum Haanoniensem [et] Richelde". Guibert describes him as "Balduinus comes de Montibus, Roberti Flandrensis comitis iunioris patrui, filius". "Balduino frater eius [Arnulphum occiso]" is named in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin. He succeeded his brother in 1071 as BAUDOUIN II Comte de Hainaut.
c) [AGNES (-[1071] or after). Comte Arnoul III names his sister Agnes in a charter dated to [1071]. It is possible that Agnes was the same person as the unnamed daughter of "Hermannus filius ducis Thuringie ex Richilde" referred to in the Annales Hanoniæ, which specify in a later passage that she became a nun. If this is correct, she was Arnoul's uterine half-sister.]
2. MATHILDE de Flandre ([1032]-Caen 2 Nov 1083, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam"[208]. Her parentage is also stated by Orderic Vitalis. Florence of Worcester records that "comitissa Mahtilda de Normannia" came to England 23 Mar [1068] and was crowned "ddie Pentecostes [11 May]" by Aldred Archbishop of York. Orderic Vitalis also records that she was crowned queen of England 11 May 1068 presumably at Westminster Abbey or Winchester Cathedral although this appears to be unrecorded. Queen Matildda acted as regent in Normandy during her husband's absences in England. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "IV Non Nov" of "Matildis Anglorum regina". Guillaume de Jumièges records the burial of Queen Mathilde on 3 NoNov 1081 at Holy Trinity, Caen. Florence of Worcester records the death "IV Non Nov" in [1083] of "regina Mahtilda" in Normandy and her burial at Caen. m (Eu, Cathedral of Notre Dame [1050/52]) GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy, illegitimate son of ROBERT “le Diable” Duke of Normandy & his mistress Arlette --- (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/8]-Rouen, Priory of St Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbey of St Etienne). He succeeded in 1066 as WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England.
a) ROBERT “Curthose” (Normandy [1052/4]-Cardiff Castle 3/10/15 Feb 1135, bur Gloucester Cathedral). William of Malmesbury names Robert as eldest son of King William I. He succeeded his father in 1087 as ROBERT III Duke of Normandy.
i) GUILLAUME de Normandie (Rouen 1101-St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin 27 Jul 1128, bur St Omer, Abbey of St Bertin). His parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was born in Rouen in the third year after his parents' marriage. Following the assassination of Count Charles, Louis VI King of France convened a meeting of Flemish barons at Arras where they elected Guillaume 21 Mar 1127 as GUILLAUME I "Clito" Count of Flanders, although he lacked any hereditary right. He was opposed by his uncle King Henry who bribed his supporters in Ghent and eastern Flanders. Lille rebelled 1 Aug 1127, and Saint-Omer 8 Feb 1128. His rival Thierry d'Alsace captured Lille, Furnes and Gent and was recognised as Count at Bruges 30 Mar 1128. Guillaume besieged Aalst in Jul 1128, helped by Godefroi Duke of Lower Lotharingia, but was injured and died from his wounds.
3. ROBERT ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Balduinum Haanoniensem, et Robdbertum cognomento postea Iherosolimitanum, et Matilde uxorem Guillelmi regis Anglorum" as the children of "Balduinum Insulanum [et] Adelam". He was regent of the county of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He succeeded his nephew in 1071 as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders.”

From Wikipedia:
“Baldwin V of Flanders (died September 1, 1067) was Count of Flanders from 1036 until his death. He was the son of Baldwin IV of Flanders, who died in 1035. He, in turn, was a descendant of Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great, Saxon King of England.
In 1028 Baldwin married Adèle of France in Amiens, daughter of King Robert II of France; at her instigation he rebelled against his father but in 1030 peace was sworn and the old count continued to rule until his death.
During a long war (1046–1056) as an ally of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine, against the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III, he initially lost Valenciennes to Hermann of Hainaut. However, when the latter died in 1049 Baldwin married his son Baldwin VI to Herman's widow Richildis and arranged that the sons of her first marriage were disinherited, thus de facto uniting the County of Hainaut with Flanders. Upon the death of Henry III this marriage was acknowledged by treaty by Agnes de Poitou, mother and regent of Henry IV.
From 1060 to 1067 Baldwin was the co-Regent with Anne of Kiev for his nephew-by-marriage Philip I of France, indicating the importance he had acquired in international politics.
Baldwin and Adèle had five children:
-Baldwin VI, 1030-1070
-Matilda, c.1031-1083 who married William the Conqueror
-Robert I of Flanders, c.1033–1093
-Henry of Flanders c.1035
-Sir Richard of Flanders c. 1050-1105”«s87» 
Baldwin V Count of Flanders (I11904)
 
234 “BEATRICE de Beauchamp (-before 30 Sep 1285). By order dated 10 Jan 1267 the king, following the death of "Johannes de Bello Campo inimici nostri interfecti apud Evesham", accepted the homage of "Matillis de Moubray et Thome filii Ottonis et Beatricis de Bello Campo uxoris sue, neptarum et heredum Johanne de Bello Campo nuper defuncte" for two parts of his lands. A writ dated 4 Oct "23 Edw I", after the death of "Isabel late the wife of Simon de Bello Campo" refers to "Wottone, the mmanor…held in dower, by the assignment of the said Simon with the consent of William de Bello Campo his father, of the heirs of the barony of Bedford", and names as heirs "of the said barony, Roger aged 30 and more, son of Maud de Moubray sister of the said Simon, Joan the wife of Ralph Paynel, aged 30, daughter of Ela sister of the said Simon, Isabel the wife of Simon de Pateshulle aged 24, daughter of Ida daughter of the same Ela, and Elizabeth the wife of John de Horbur aged 34, daughter of the same Ela, are parceners with the heirs of the body of Beatrice sometime sister of the said Simon", adding that Beatrice had married "first to Thomas son of Otto, who had by her a son named Otto now deceased, and a daughter named Maaud now aged 26 years and the wife of John Botetourte…after the death of the said Thomas she was married to Sir William de Montecanyso of Edwardestone who had by her a son named William, who if he survives as the jury believe, is 12 years old and more". m firstly (before 1263) THOMAS FitzOtes of Mendlesham, Suffolk, son of OTES FitzWilliam & his wife Margaret --- ([before 1230]-before 23 Mar 1274). m secondly (before Jun 1278) WILLIAM [II] de Munchensy, son of WILLIAM [I] de Munchensy & his wife Joan de Crek ([1229/30]-[27 Apr/14 May] 1302).”«s87» DE BEAUCHAMP, Beatrice (I12443)
 
235 “Beheaded 6 May 1471.”«s79» AUDLEY, Humphrey (I11777)
 
236 “BERENGARIO di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO I Conte e Marchese d'Ivrea & his first wife Gisela di Friulia ([900]-in prison Bamberg 6 Jul 966, bur Regensburg). Liutprand names Berengar as son of "Adelberto Eporegiæ civitatis marchione [et]…Gisla Berengarii regis filia". He took part in the battle of Firenzuola against his maternal grandfather. He succeeded his father in [923/24] as BERENGARIO II Marchese d'Ivrea. In [940], he was forced to flee Ivrea by Ugo King of Italy who abolished the March of Ivrea. He was invited to the court of King Ugo, who intended to blind him, but was warned by Ugo's son Lothar and made his escape. He found refuge with Hermann Duke of Swabia, and later settled at the court of Otto I King of Germany. After returning to Italy in 945, he defeated King Ugo who was declared deposed by a diet at Milan, although Berengario allowed him to retain the title of king and himself assumed the title summus consiliarius. He was proclaimed BERENGARIO III King of Italy by a general diet at Pavia 15 Dec 950, after the death of Lothar King of Italy. However, King Otto invaded Italy, on the pretext of King Berengario's mistreatment of Adelais, the wife of his predecessor King Lothar, and himself took the title King of Italy at Pavia 23 Sep 951. Having submitted to Otto, Berengario proposed himself as viceroy in Italy, which was accepted by the council of Augsburg Aug 952. Berengario reasserted his independence. Otto sent his son Liudolf to reimpose order, but the latter died there of fever in 957. After several further years of tyrannical rule, Otto invaded Italy again in Aug 961 in response to requests for his intervention from Pope John XII and Hubert [de Provence] Dukuke of Spoleto, one of Berengario's main vassals. He forced Berengario's retreat to the fortress of San Giulio near Montefeltro in 962. He finally captured Berengario in 963, and took him as a prisoner to Bamberg, where he died soon after. The necrology of Fulda records the death "966 2 Non Aug" of "Berenger rex". Regino records the death of Berengario and his burial at Regensburg.
m ([930/31]) WILLA d’Arles, daughter of BOSO Comte d’Avignon Marchese of Tuscany & his wife Willa --- ([910]-Bamberg after 966). "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso and Willa by Liutprand. WWilla is named "rex Hugo neptim suam…ex Willa uxore sua Boso Tusciæ provinciæ marchio regis frater" by Liutprand when he records her marriage to Berengario. She ordered the imprisonment of Adelheid, widow of her husband's predecessor Lothar [de Provence] King of Italy. She retreated with her husband to the fortress of San Giulio in the face of Otto King of Germany's invasion, but was captured and taken to Bamberg with Berengario. Regino records that Willa became a nun after her husband died before he was buried.
Berengario & his wife had [seven] children:
1.ADALBERTO di Ivrea ([932/936]-Autun 30 Apr 971[592]). Liudprand names "Adalbertus" as son of "Berengarius". His father installed him in 951 as ADALBERTO associate-King of Italy. When Otto I King of Germany invaded Italy in 962, Adalberto retreated with his brother Guido to fortresses near Lakes Como and Garda. Conspiring with Pope John XII, he entered Rome in Oct 963 but was put to flight by Emperor Otto in the following month, along with Pope John whom Otto deposed for his betrayal. Adalberto wandered the Mediterranean for three years unsuccessfully attempting to find support, and eventually retired to lands in the valley of the Saône. m (before [960/62]) as her first husband, GERBERGE, daughter of --- & his wife Adélaïde [de Bourgogne] ([945]-11 Dec [986/991]). Her name and her two marriages are confirmed by the Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, which names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that her son was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus". Her birth date is estimated from the estimated birth date of her son in [960/62]. The Vita of Hugues Comte de Chalon refers to his (unnamed) sister as having married the Duke of Burgundy. Chronologically, this refers most probably to Duke Henri who died in 1002, although the original of this document has not yet been consulted to check whether the wording supports this conclusion. Gerberge's origin has not yet been corroborated in the other primary sources so far consulted. The Vita appears to indicate that she was Gerberge, daughter of Lambert Comte de Chalon, but this raises several problems if it is correct. Firstly, on the death without direct heirs in 1039 of her supposed brother Hugues Comte de Chalon, the county was inherited by the comparatively obscure children of his younger sister Mathilde, apparently ignoring the superior claims of Gerberge's own numerous descendants, among whom were the powerful counts palatine of Burgundy who, one would have thought, would not have missed the opportunity of acquiring another county. Rodulfus Glaber does record that "Hugo filius Lanberti Cabilonensis comitis…episcopus Autissioderi" was an opponent of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius"[596], which could explain why Bishop Hugues favoured his nephew by his younger sister to succeed to his county. Nevertheless, after the bishop's death, his past opposition to Comte Otto-Guillaume may have provided an excuse for his son to intervene in the Chalon succession if he had a legitimate claim. Secondly, considering the likely birth date of her son, Gerberge's first marriage must have taken place while her husband and father-in-law were still reigning kings of Italy. They were under continuous pressure from Otto I King of Germany and it is likely that Adalberto's marriage could have brought additional political support. It is not clear how the relatively obscure count of Chalon could have provided this. Thirdly, after the death in 978 of Lambert Comte de Chalon, and his widow's second marriage to Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, no record haas been found in the primary sources so far consulted of Henri Duke of Burgundy intervening to prevent Comte Geoffroy taking control of the county of Chalon, which would seem the likely course of action if his wife was the deceased count's oldest child. Fourthly, Gerberge's estimated birth date creates serious chronological problems if she was the daughter of Lambert's only known wife Adelais. Considerable doubt therefore appears to subsist on this origin of Gerberge, although no alternative can as yet be proposed if we are to respect the wording of the Vita. She married secondly Henri Duke of Burgundy [Capet]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 11 Dec of "Gerberga comitissa uxor Henrici ducis". Adalberto & his wife had [two] children:
a) GUGLIELMO di Ivrea ([960/62]-Dijon 21 Sep 1026). Rodulfus Glaber names "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" and records that, as a boy, he was secretly stolen from the land of the Lombards and restored to his mother with no small cunning by a certain monk. "Einricus…imperator" confirmed the property of the abbey of Fruttuaria, referring to property donated by "Otto qui et Vuillielmus comes filius Adalberti nepos Berengarii regis", by charter dated 1014. It is assumed from this that he was imprisoned as a child by Emperor Otto I in Italy after his father and paternal grandfather were deposed as kings of Italy. The Chronicle of Saint-Bénigne, interpolated into the Chronicle of Alberiic de Trois-Fontaines, names "Guilelmum Ottonem et eius matrem Gerbergam" when recording that he was adopted by his mother's second husband "dux Burgundie Henricus". He adopted the name OTHON-GUILLAUME. He succeeded as OTHON [I] Comte de Mâcon, by right of his first wife.
b) [WILLIBIRG. Jackman suggests that the mother of Hunifried canon at Strasbourg was the daughter of Adalberto associate King of Italy. He bases this on onomastic reasons, in particular the importation of the Ivrean name Berengar into the famimily of Liutold and the use of "Willa" among the ancestors of Adalbert King of Italy. However, another origin is suggested by the necrology of Zwiefalten which records the death "XIV Kal Dec" of "Unruoch proavus Liutoldi comitis". If this greagreat grandfather were the father of Willibirg, it may also explain how the name Berenger entered the family, assuming Unruoch was related to the Unruochingi Counts of Friulia. m LIUTOLD Graf im Sundgau, son of KONRAD Duke of Swabia [Konradiner] & his wife Richlint of Germany.]”
2. GUIDO di Ivrea ([940]-killed in battle on the Po 25 Jun 965). The Gesta Mediolanensium names (in order) "Widone, Adelberto et Conone" as sons of King Berengario (although Adalberto was presumably the oldest son as his father installed him as associated king), specifying that "Widone" was killed soon after his father's capture. Marchese d'Ivrea (957-62). He conquered Spoleto and Camerino in 959. When Otto I King of Germany invaded in 962, Guido retreated with his brother Adalberto to fortresses near Lakes Como and Garda. "Otto…imperator augustus" gave property "in comitatu Motinense seu Boloniense" previously held by "Uuidoni quondam marchioni seu Conrado qui et Cono…filiis Berengarii seu Uuille ipsius Berengarii uxoris eorumque matris" to Guido Bishop of Modena by charter dated 12 Sep 963. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "25 Jun" of "Vuido filius Berengaris regis".
3. CORRADO CONO di Ivrea (-[998/1001]). The Gesta Mediolanensium names (in order) "Widone, Adelberto et Conone" as sons of King Berengario, specifying that "Conone" made peace with the emperor[606]. Marchese of Milan [957-61]. "Otto…imperator augustus" gave property "in comitatu Motinense seu Boloniense" previously held by "Uuidoni quondam marchioni seu Conrado qui et Cono…filiis Berengarii seu Uuille ipsius Berengarii uxoris eorumque matris" to Guido Bishop of Modena by charter dated 12 Sep 963. He abandoned his brother Adalberto, recognising the authority of the emperor, and was installed in [965] as CORRADO Marchese d'Ivrea. m (before 987) RICHILDA, daughter of ARDUINO "Glabrio" Marchese of Turin & his wife --- (-after 989). The primary source which confirms the name and origin of the wife of Corrado Cono has not yet been identified.
4.GISLA di Ivrea . "Gislam [et]…Girbergam" are named as daughters of Berengar and Willa by Liutprand. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Nun, living 965. [m RAMBOLDO [II], son of [RAMBOLDO [I] & his wife ---] (-before 1040). According to the Almanach de Gotha, Ramboldo I was ancestor of the family Collalto. According to Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, he was sent to Treviso by Otto I King of Germany 14 Nov 944. Ancestors of the Conti di Treviso e Collalto.]
5. GILBERGA di Ivrea (945-). "Gislam [et]…Girbergam" are named as daughters of Berengar and Willa by Liutprand[612]. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. m (before Aug 961) as his second wife, ALERAMO Signor del Marchio del Monferrato, son of Conte GUGLIELMO [Monferrato] & his wife --- (-[967/91]).
6. ROZALA di Ivrea ([950/960]-7 Feb or 13 Dec 1003, bur Gent, church of the Abbey de Saint-Pierre du Mont-Blandin). The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regigis Susannam". Regino records that two of the daughters (unnamed) of ex-King Berengario were brought up in the imperial palace by the empress after being brought to Germany. One of these two daughters was presumably Rozala, bearing in mind that the emperor arranged her marriage. According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala di Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976 but the source on which this is based has not been located. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertininiana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul. Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when the Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own influence in the county. The Vita Sancti Bertulfi names "Rozala filia…Berengarii Regis Italiæ", specifying that "post mortem Arnulfi [Balduini filius] principis, Roberto Regi Francorum nupsit et Susanna dicta". Hugues "Capet" King of France arranged her second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987. She adopted the name SUZANNE on her second marriage, and was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the County of Flanders as her dowry. Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer. The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina". The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb". m firstly ([968]) ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, son of BAUDOUIN III joint Count of Flanders & his wife Mechtild of Saxony [Billung] ([961/62]-30 Mar 987, bur Ghent). m secondly (988 before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as his first wife, ROBERT Associate-King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France.
7.[BERTA . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Abbess of San Sisto at Piacenza 952.]«s87» 
Berengario II King of Italy (I13853)
 
237 “BERENGER, son of --- . Comte [de Bayeux]. 889/before 931.
m --- de Bretagne, daughter of GURWENT [Gurvand] Duke of Brittany & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.
Comte Bérenger & his wife had one son:
1. JUDICAËL [Juhael] (-[970]). "Juhel Berenger consul" donated property to the abbey of Redon "sueque conjugis Hadouis et…duorum filiorum suorum Mathathiæ et Mathiæ" by charter dated [931]. Comte de Rennes. m GERBERGE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Comte Judicaël & his wife had [two] sons:
a) CONAN de Rennes (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992). The Chronicle of Nantes names "Conano filio Judicael Berengarii Redonensi comite" when recording that he held a large part of Brittany from Thibaut [II] Comte de Blois. Comte de Rennes. He succeeded in [970] as CONAN I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany.
b) [MEEN (-1020). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Seigneur de Fougères. "Mainonis avi mei…Alfridus genitor meus" are named in the undated charter under which "Maino" donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Fougères.]”

From Wikipedia:
“Berengar II (died 896) was the Count of Bayeux and Rennes and Margrave of the Breton March from 886 until his death a decade later.
Roland and his successors under Guy of Nantes were aristocrats from Maine. Berengar's kin became the first bilingual Breton and Gallo speaking lords holding residence within Brittany (Rennes and Penthièvre, rather than the Loire Valley-predominant Nantes or Vannes, which nevertheless had at least one Franco-Saxon conflict in Angers), as a consequence of the Breton nobility being more or less broken under the Norman invasions of the 880s and as a reward for holding his ground against their attacks.
Berengar was named for Berengar I of Neustria, but was most likely the son of Henry of Franconia, himself a member of the Senior Capets through the Babenberg lineage. He is likely to have been Henry's son because (1) Berengar named his daughter the feminine form of Poppo, a name common among the Babenbergs, and (2) the main Capetian branch had traditionally held the Breton March. Of course, this is all theoretical and the lineage of Berengar might very well have been Saxon, considering the known presence of a raiding colony of that people in the Bessin and the fact that the Frankish element of this region was never strong, despite involved forenames. Compare Wessex across the English Channel and their ethnic mixture with Cornwall, as well as the pre-Norman Conquest presence of Bretons in England, such as Alan II, Duke of Brittany or Ralph the Staller. These theories are alternatives to the traditionally Breton genealogical origin, because the area was once known as "New Brittany" in the Latin language: Brittania Nova, in Merovingian Francia. It may be said that this lineage was due to Berengar perhaps being descended from Breton expansionists in pre-Capetian West Francia and before the establishment of Normandy as a polity dependent upon the County of Rouen, which annexed Bayeux. All three ideas of origin are as intimately related to later conditions during the Hundred Years' War, as they are to the previous status of Britannia as a Roman Diocese within the Prefecture of Gaul and the general interrelatedness of the people and their bicoastal cultural character.
Berengar married the daughter of Gurvand, Duke of Brittany, by which relationship he attained the countship of Rennes. His brother-in-law, Judicael became Duke of Brittany. Berengar's son was Judicael Berengar, who succeeded him as Count of Rennes. His daughter was Poppa, who was strategically wed to Rollo of Normandy.«s87» 
Berengar Count of Bayeux and Rennes (I12631)
 
238 “BERGLJOT (-after 1050). Snorre names "two sons, Svein and Hemin, and a daughter Bergljot" as the children of "Earl Hakon" & his wife, recording that Bergljot later married "Einar Tabaskielfer". m EINAR Thambarskelfir (-killed in battle 1050).
a) EINDRID Einarsson (-killed in battle 1050). Snorre names Eindride as son of "Einar Tambaskelfer" & his wife. m SIGRID Kettilsdatter, daughter of KETTIL Kalf & his wife Gunhild Sigurdsdatter of Norway. Snorre names "Sigrid, a daughter of Ketil Kalf and Gunhild, King Harald's sister" as the wife of Eindride, son of "Einar Tambaskelfer".
b) ALOF Einarsdatter . m THORD Folesson (-killed in battle 29 Jul [31 Aug] 1030).”«s87» 
HÅKONSDTR, Bergljot (I9604)
 
239 “BERNARD (before 895[97]-[950]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bernardus" as son of "Willelmo". He succeeded as Comte de Périgord. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Lambertus vicecomes Martiliacensis et Arnaldus frater eius" were killed "a Bernardo" (clarified in a later passage as meaning Bernard, son of Guillaume Comte de Périgord) in revenge for "Santie sororis sue [Alduini]", without further explanation or detail regarding their offence against Sancha. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that the testament of "Willelmus Sector ferri" was signed by "Bernardus comes, Arnoldus filius Bernardi…". "Bernardus…comes Petragoricensis" donated property to the monastery of Sarlat, with the consent of "uxore mea Garsinda", for the soul of "filiis et filiabus nostris…fratribus quoque nostris", by charter dated Jun [936/42], subscribed by "Guillelmi, Arnaldi, Gauberti, Bernardi, Ramnulphi, Alduini, Gaufredi, Heliæ, Amalgerii, Fulcherii, Oldolrici". "Guillelmus comes" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Cybard by charter dated after 942, subscribed by "Domni Guillelmi comitis et monachi, Bernardi comitis, Arnaldi filii sui, comitis, Odolrici vice comitis, Ademari vicececomitis…Ademari comitis filii Guillelmi". He succeeded his cousin in [945] as BERNARD I Comte d'Angoulême. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Bernardus comes" succeeded "Willelmus…Sector ferri" in Angoulême and that he and hihis sons ruled there for thirty years". "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter[104]. He, his wife Garsinde, and sons (in order) Bernard, Guillaume, Arnaud, Gausbert, Ramnulf, Hilduin and Geoffroy are named in his document dated to [936/42] describing his restoration of the monastery of Sarlat in Périgord. m firstly BERTHE, daughter of ---. "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter. m secondly GARSINDE, daughter of ---. She is named as wife of Comte Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat. Comte Bernard I & his first wife had four children:
i) ARNAUD "Borracio" (-before 6 Aug 962, bur basilica Sancti Eparchii). Ademar names (in order) "Arnaldus cognomento Borracio, Willelmus Talerandus, Rannulfus Bomparius, Richardus Insipiens" as sons of "Bernardus comes Petragoricensis", specifying that Arnaud was buried "iuxta basilicam sancti Eparchii". The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that the testament of "Willelmus Sector ferri" was signed by "Bernardus comes, Arnoldus filius Bernardi…". "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter. He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to ththe monastery of Sarlat. "Guillelmus comes" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Cybard by charter dated after 942, subscribed by "Domni Guillelmi comitis et monachi, Bernardi comitis, Arnaldi filii sui, comitis, Odolrici vice comitis, Ademari vicecomitis…Ademari comitis filii Guillelmi". He succeeded as Comte de Périgord. m ALDEALENDIS, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.
ii) GUILLAUME (-6 Aug 962). Ademar names (in order) "Arnaldus cognomento Borracio, Willelmus Talerandus, Rannulfus Bomparius, Richardus Insipiens" as sons of "Bernardus comes Petragoricensis". "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter. He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat. He succeeded as GUILLAUME III Comte de d'Angoulême, and as Comte de Périgord. The death "VIII Id Aug 962" of "Willelmus comes Egolismensis Talerandus" is recorded in the Annales Engolismenses[116].
iii) GAUSBERT . "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter. He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat.
iv) BERNARD . "Bernardus comes" restored the abbey of Saint-Sour de Genouillac, with the consent of "uxore mea…Berta et filiis meis Guillelmo…atque Gausberto, seu Arnaldo, et Bernardo pariter", by undated charter. He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat.
v) [AINA [Emma] ([930]-after 988). Ademar names "sorore Bernardi…Emma" as wife of "Bosonis Vetuli", although this appears difficult to sustain chronologically given the likely birth date range of Bernard in [892/95] and the likely death date of Bernard's father Guillaume in [918]. It is therefore probable that "soror" was an error for "filia", unless Aina was Bernard's uterine sister by an unidentified second marriage of his mother. If Aina was the daughter of Bernard, her naming one of her sons Gausbert suggests that his first wife was her mother, Bernard's son Gausbert being one of his older children, no doubt also born from this first marriage. m BOSON I "le Vieux" Comte de la Marche, son of Comte SULPICE & his wife [--- de Limoges] (-before 974).]
Comte Bernard I & his second wife had [five] children:
vi) RANULF "Bompar" (-killed in battle 27 Jul 975). Ademar names (in order) "Arnaldus cognomento Borracio, Willelmus Talerandus, Rannulfus Bomparius, Richardus Insipiens" as sons of "Bernardus comes Petragoricensis". He is named as the son oof Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat, referred to above. He succeeded as RANULF Comte de d'Angoulême, Comte de Périgord. The Annales Engolismenses records that "Ramnulfus comes Egolismensis" was killed "VI Kal Aug 975". He was killed fighting his second cousin Arnaud "Mancer".
vii) RICHARD "Insipiens" (-after 975). Ademar names (in order) "Arnaldus cognomento Borracio, Willelmus Talerandus, Rannulfus Bomparius, Richardus Insipiens" as sons of "Bernardus comes Petragoricensis", specifying that he was expelled from Angoulême after his brother was killed by their second cousin Arnaud "Mancer". He succeeded as RICHARD Comte d'Angoulême, Comte de Périgord. He lost the county of Angoulême in 975.
viii) HILDUIN . He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat, referred to above.
ix) GEOFFROY . He is named as the son of Bernard in the [936/42] document relating to the monastery of Sarlat, referred to above.
x) daughters . The charter dated Jun [936/42] under which "Bernardus…comes Petragoricensis" donated property to the monastery of Sarlat, with the consent of "uxore mea Garsinda", for the soul of "filiis et filiabus nostris…fratribus quoque nostris" shows that the couple had daughters.”«s87» 
Bernard I Comte de Périgord, Comte d’Angoulême (I14691)
 
240 “BERNARD de la Marche ([991/93]-[1038/16 Jun 1047]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bernardus" as son of "Aldebertus frater [Helias Petragoricensi comite]" and his wife "sorore Widonis vicecomitis". The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Marchiæ…filius Bernardi, qui fuit Audeberti, qui fuit Bosonis, qui Sulpicii, qui fuit Godfredi primi comitis de Karrofo". The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bernardo filio Hildeberti", specifying that he succeeded in la Marche on the death of Boson Comte de Périgord et de la Marche. He succeeded his uncle in [1003/12] as Comte de la Marche. m AMELIA, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Comte Bernard & his wife had six children:
a) AUDEBERT [II] de la Marche (-1088). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Marchiæ…filius Bernardi, qui fuit Audeberti, qui fuit Bosonis, qui Sulpicii, qui fuit Godfredi primi comitis de Karrofo". He succeeded his father [1038/1047] as Comte de la Marche. "…Audeberti comitis de Marca…" subscribed the charter dated [1047] under which "Guilelmus…princeps Arvernorum" donated property to the abbey of Charroux. "Aldeberti comitis" subscribed the charter dated [1058/68] of "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus". The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death in 1088 of "Audebertus comes de Marchia" and the succession of "Boso filius eius". m PONCE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. [1080]. Comte Audebert II & his wife had five children:
i) BOSON [III] de la Marche (-killed in battle near Confolens 1091). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the death in 1088 of "Audebertus comes de Marchia" and the succession of "Boso filius eius". He succeeded his father in 1088 as Comte de la Marche. "…Boso…comes de Marchia…" affirmed the actions of "Amatus [archiepiscopi Burdagelensisi Legatique apostolici]" in the charter dated [1090]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Boso comes de Marchia" was killed "Confolento castro" in 1091 and was succeeded by "Aumodis soror sua". m [ALDEARDIS, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 1091].
ii) son (-before 1091). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
iii) son (-before 1091). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
iv) ALMODIS de la Marche (-[1117/29]). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records that "Boso comes de Marchia" was killed "Confolento castro" in 1091 and was succeeded by "Aumodis soror sua", wife of "Rotgerio comite". Ctss de la Marche 1098. m (before 1091) ROGER de Montgommery, son of ROGER [II] de Montgommery, Sire d'Alençon, Earl of Shropshire and Shrewsbury & his first wife Mabile d'Alençon (-1123). He was a considerable landowner in England especially in Lancashire but was banished in 1102 with his brother Robert and retired to Poitou. Comte de la Marche in 1113, de iure uxoris.
v) daughter . The Vita Simonis, interpolated in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, records the betrothal of "comes Symon" and "filiam comitis Hildeberti de Alvernis", specifying that Simon fled "ad monasterio de Casa Dei" without hiis father's knowledge before the marriage. It is possible that this daughter was the same person as Almodis, who later married Roger de Montgommery (see above). Betrothed (before 1077) to SIMON de Crépy Comte du Vexin et de Bar-sur-Aube, son of RAOUL III “le Grand” Comte de Valois & his first wife Adela [Aélis] de Bar-sur-Aube (-[30 Sep/1 Oct] 1080 Rome, bur 1082 Rome St Peter). He resigned his county in 1077, became a monk and went on pilgrimage to Rome where he died.
b) EUDES [I] de la Marche (-[25 Apr 1091/12 Nov 1098]). The cartulary of Tulle St Martin records a donation by "Odo comes, consentiente fratre meo Aldeberto comite", undated but dated to [1106] in the edition, although this date would be incorrrrect if the donor is correctly identified as Eudes [I] Comte de la Marche. He succeeded in 1081 as Comte de la Marche. The cartulary of Tulle St Martin records a donation by "Oddo comes Marchiæ" with the consent of "fratre meo Aldeberto" dated "IV Non Ian".
c) ALMODIS de la Marche (-murdered 16 Oct 1071). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Almodim…sororem Audeberti comitis de Marcha" and "Pontius comes Tolosanus", specifying that she was previously the wife of "Hugo Pius de Liziniaco" from whom she was separated for consanguinity and that afterwards she married "Raimundo Barcinonensi". "Poncius Tolosanæ urbis comes" named "Adalmodis uxoris mee" in his donation to Cluny dated 29 Jun 1053. The Gesta Comitum Barcinonensium records that "Petrus Raimundi" murdered his stepmother "Adalmoyn". m firstly (repudiated) HUGUES V "le Pieux" Sire de Lusignan, son of HUGUES IV "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Auliarde de Thouars (-killed in battle Lusignan 8 Oct 11060). m secondly ([1045], repudiated before 1053) as his second wife PONS II Comte de Toulouse, son of GUILLAUME III "Taillefer" Comte de Toulouse & his second wife Emma de Provence ([991]-1060, bur Toulouse, Saint-Sernin). m thirdly (1053) as his third wife, RAMÓN BERENGUER "el Viejo" Conde de Barcelona, son of BERENGUER RAMÓN "el Curvo" Conde de Barcelona & his second wife Sancha Sánchez de Castilla (1023-26 May 1076).
d) RAINGARDE de la Marche . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 22 Apr 1070 under which “Rangardis comitissa, filia…Ameliæ comitissæ” sold property in “comitatu Redensi, Cosaranensi, et Comeniensi, et Carcassonensi, et Narbonensi, et Minerbensi, et Tolosano”, previously held by “Rodgario comite vetulo Carcassonensi et Otone fratre eius comite Redensi et…Bernardo Rodgarii et Raymundo Rodgarii et Petro episcopo filiorum prædicti Rodgarii, et…Petri Raymundi comitis mariti mei et Rodgarii filii mei”, to “Raimundo comiti Barcheonensi et Almodi comitissæ coniugi vestræ sorori meæ et filio vestro Raymundo Berengarii”. m PIERRE RAYMOND Comte de Carcassonne, Vicomte de Béziers et d'Agde, son of RAYMOND ROGER [I] Comte de Carcassonne & his wife Garsindis de Béziers (-1060).]
e) LUCIE de la Marche (-after 1090). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m ([1057/58]) as his second wife, ARTALDO [I] Comte de Pallars, son of GUILLERMO [II] Conde de Pallars-Subirà & his wife Estefania ---. 1081.
f) AGNES de la Marche . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m RAMNULFE de Montmorillon . 1098.”«s87» 
Bernard Comte de la Marche (I13245)
 
241 “BERNARD, illegitimate son of PEPIN I King of Italy & his mistress --- ([797]-Milan 17 Aug 818, bur Milan, San Ambrosio). Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina". Bernard is named only son of Pippin by Einhard. Regino names "Bernhardus filius Pippin rex Italiæ" when recording his death in 818. Settipani cites a litany of St Gallen which lists Bernard among Carolingians of illegitimate birth. He was brought up at Kloster Fulda. His paternal grandfather sent him back to Italy in autumn 812, granting him the title "rex Langobardorum" in Apr 813. Einhard's Annales that "Walanem filium Bernhardi patruelis sui" was sent to Italy in 812 as guardian for "Bernhardum filium Pippin nepotepotem suum [Karoli imperatoris]". He was confirmed 11 Sep 813 at Aix-la-Chapelle as BERNARD I King of Italy, as vassal of the emperor, ruling under the regency of Adalhard abbé de Corbie. Although he swore allegiance to his uncle Emperor Louis I "le Pieux" on the latter's accession in 814, the emperor passed the Ordinatio Imperii in Jul 817 which failed to mention Bernard's royal status, effectively depriving him of any role in government and of his royal title. Bernard rebelled unsuccessfully in Dec 817. He was tricked into returning to France to ask for the emperor's forgiveness at Chalon-sur-Saône, but was taken to Aix-la-Chapelle where he was sentenced to death. The Annales Xantenses record that "Bernhardus rex Langobardorum" was blinded in 818. Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that "Bernhardus filius Pippini ex concubina" was blinded and died on the third day which followed this. After his death, Italy was once more placed under the direct rule of the emperor.
m ([813]) CUNIGUNDIS --- (-after 15 Jun 835). Settipani refers to an act of the monastery of San Alessandro, Parma dated 15 Jun 835 which names her. The origin of Cunigundis is not known. Settipani suggests that she was Cunigundis, daughter oof Héribert, relative of St Guillaume Comte de Toulouse in order to explain the transmission of the name Héribert into the family of Bernard King of Italy. This is highly speculative. It would also mean that Héribert was older than suggested in the document CAROLINGIAN NOBILITY, as it is unlikely that Cunigundis was born later than 800 assuming that the birth date of her son is correctly estimated at [815].
King Bernard & his wife had one son:
1. PEPIN ([815]-after 850). Regino names "Pippinum" son of "Bernhardus filius Pippin rex Italiæ". Seigneur de Péronne et de Saint Quentin. Comte near Paris after 834.”«s87» 
Bernard I King of Italy (I10645)
 
242 “BERNARDO [I] (-[950/56], bur Ovarra). The Codex de Roda names "Uernardo et domno Miro ac domno Lope seu domno Ysarno" as the children of "Regemondo" and his wife[144]. Conde de Ribagorza. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon records that “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie” built the monastery of Ovarra and was buried there with his wife[145]. m TOTA, daughter of GALINDO Aznarez Conde de Aragón & his wife Sancha García de Pamplona (-bur Ovarra). The Codex de Roda names "domnna Tota…domnus Redemtus episcopus et domno Miro" as the children of "Galindo Asnari" and his first wife Acibella, stating that Toda married "Uernardi comitis"[146]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Totam filiam Galindonis comitis Aragonensis” as wife of “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie”, adding that they built the monastery of Ovarra where they were both buried[147]. Bernardo [I] & his wife had [five] children:
i) RAIMUNDO [II] (-970). The Codex de Roda names "Regemundo ac domno Galindo seu domna Aba" as the children of "Uernardus" and his wife[148]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Regimundum et Borrelum et Mironem” as the three sons of “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie” and his wife, adding that Raimundo inherited Ribagorza including “villam bonam et sanctum Petrum de nubibus et Superarbiam usque ut in Madierro”[149]. Conde de Ribagorza. “Regimundus…commes…et coniux mea Eresindis” donated property for the monastery of San Vicente by charter which is dated 1 Dec “anno regnante Leutario rege” and also quotes the date “957”[150]. This charter indicates that Raimundo was the vassal of the French kiking (Lothaire). m GERSENDE de Fezensac, daughter of GUILLAUME García Comte de Fezensac & his wife --- (-after 1 Dec 957). The Codex de Roda names "domna --- Gilelmo Garsias filia" as the wife of "Regemundus"[151]. Another passage in the Codex de Roda names "Regemundus de Fedenzac, et Oton, ac Fridolo, et Bernardo, at domna ---" as the children of "Gilelmo Garsies" and his unnamed wife, stating that the unnamed daughter was the mother of "domne Abe comitisse"[152]. Her name is indicated by the undated charter under which “Unifredus comes” donated property “ad Stum Petrum de Lastanosa”, for the souls of “parente meo Raimundo comite et…matre mea Gersinde comittissa”[153]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon nnames “Garsendis…de Gallis” as wife of “Regimundi…comes Ripacurcie”[154]. “Regimundus…commes…et coniux mea Eresindis” donated property for the monastery of San Vicente by charter which is dated 1 Dec “anno regnante Leutario rege” and also quotes the date “957”[155]. Raimundo [II] & his wife had six children:
(a) UNIFREDO (-[980/81], bur Alaon). The Codex de Roda names "domno Unifredus ac domnus Arnaldus, seu Ysarno, ac domna Aba Castelle comitissa" as the children of "Regemundus" and his wife[156]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Unifredus, Arnaldus et Isarnus et Odisendus Episcopus” as the sons of “Regimundi…comitis”[157]. Conde de Ribagorza. “Unifredus comes” donated property “ad Stum Petrum de Lastanosa”, for the souls of “parente meo Raimundo comiite et…matre mea Gersinde comittissa”, by undated charter[158]. “Atho Ripa-curiæ comes…” confirmed a donation by charter dated 8 Feb 973, naming “…comite Vaifaredo congermano meo in Ripa-curia et in Pallaria” in the dating clause[159]. The word “congermano” suggests that “Vaifaredo” and Ato were brought up together, although it is uncertain whether this also implies a blood relationship. Ato´s birth is fixed to [924/25], and no references have been found to his father after that date. It is possibly that Ato´s father died soon afterwards and that his mother remarried with the father of “Vaifaredo”. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon records that “Unifredus frater [error for filius]…Regimundi comes Ripacurcie“ was buried with his wife at Alaon[160]. m SANCHA, daughter of --- (-bur Alaon). A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon records names “Sanciam” as wife of “Unifredus frater [error for filius]…Regimundi comes Ripacurcie“, adding that she died childless and was buried with her husband at Alaon[161].
(b) ARNALDO (-after 990). The Codex de Roda names "domno Unifredus ac domnus Arnaldus, seu Ysarno, ac domna Aba Castelle comitissa" as the children of "Regemundus" and his wife[162]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Unifredus, Arnaldus et Isarnus et Odisendus Episcopus” as the sons of “Regimundi…comitis”[163].
(c) ISARN (-killed in battle Monte Sion ----). The Codex de Roda names "domno Unifredus ac domnus Arnaldus, seu Ysarno, ac domna Aba Castelle comitissa" as the children of "Regemundus" and his wife[164]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Unifredus, Arnaldus et Isarnus et Odisendus Episcopus” as the sons of “Regimundi…comitis”, adding in a later passage that Isarn succeeded his brother as count but was killed by the Moors “in Monte Sion”[165]. Conde de Ribagorza. Aznar had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:
(1) GUILLERMO Isárnez (-[1018]). A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Guillelmi Isarni” as son of “Isarnus…ex concubina“, adding that he was “in curia regis Sancii avunculi sui” and was sent for by “Tota” to succeed to the county but that after he died the territory was held by “rex Sancius”[166]. Conde de Ribagorza. “…Comite Guillelmo in Ripa-curtia, comite Raimundo in Palliares” are named in the dating clause of a charter dated 22 Sep 1005 under which “Atho vicecomes de Sola” confirmed the foundation of the monastery of Alaon[167]. After his death, Sancho III "el Mayor" King of Navarre occupied the county of Ribagorza.
(d) ODISENDO (-after 975). A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Unifredus, Arnaldus et Isarnus et Odisendus Episcopus” as the sons of “Regimundi…comitis”[168]. Bishop of Pallars 956.
(e) ABA (-after 995, bur San Pedro de Cerdaña). The Codex de Roda names "domno Unifredus ac domnus Arnaldus, seu Ysarno, ac domna Aba Castelle comitissa" as the children of "Regemundus" and his wife[169]. A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon records that “Ova filia Regimundi” married “comitis Sanctii de Castella” (error for García)[170]. "Garcia comes" and his wife "Ava" donated property to the monastery of Arlanza by charter dated 12 Jul 970[171]. According to popular legend, she fomented revolt against her husband and even offered her hand in marriage to a Muslim in exchange for killing Count García, but the historical accuracy of this is doubtful[172]. m ([958/61]) GARCÍA Fernández Conde de Castilla, son of FERNANDO González Conde de Castilla & his first wife Sancha Sánchez de Navarra (-Córdoba 29 Jul 995, bur Tres Santos, Córdoba, later moved to San Pedro de Cerdaña).
(f) TODA . A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon records that “Tota uxor Unifredi” married “Sumarium nepotem suum“ after the death of “Isarni fratris sui”, adding that she was childless and, after her husband, died that she sent “ad Castellam per nepotem suum…Guillelmi Isarni” who was “in curia regis Sancii avunculi sui”[173]. This passage is confused as an earlier part of the text names Sancha as wife of Unifredo. It is assumed that Toda was the sister not wife of Unifredo. m as his second wife, SUNYER Conde de Pallars, son of LOPE de Pallars & his wife Gotruda de Cerdanya (-1010).
ii) GALINDO (-after 930). The Codex de Roda names "Regemundo ac domno Galindo seu domna Aba" as the children of "Uernardus" and his wife[174]. m ([930]) as her second husband, VELASQUITA de Navarra, widow of MUNIO [Vélaz] Conde de Vizcaya, daughter of SANCHO I García King of Navarre & his second wife Toda Aznárez. The Codex de Roda names "Garsea rex et domna Onneca et domna Sanzia et domna Urraca…domna Belasquita, necnon et domna Orbita" as the children of "Sanzio Garseanis" and his wife "Tota Asnari", stating that Velasquita married "domni Momi comitis Bizcahiensis", secondly "domni Galindi filium Uernardi comitis et domne Tute" and thirdly "Furtunio Galindonis"[175]. She married thirdly Fortún Galíndez Señor de Nájera.
iii) BORRELL . A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Regimundum et Borrelum et Mironem” as the three sons of “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie” and his wife, adding that Borrell inherited Pallars[176]. m ---. The name of Borrell´s wife is not known. Borrell & his wife had [one child]:
(a) [LOPE . A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Lupum” as the son of “Borrellus Paliarensis comes” and names the descendants of Lope[177]. This contradicts the Codex de Roda, according to which Lope was the son of Raimundo [I] Conde de Ribagorza (see below).]
iv) MIRO . A Fragmentum historicum in the cartulary of Alaon names “Regimundum et Borrelum et Mironem” as the three sons of “Bernardus comes Ripacurcie” and his wife, adding that Miro inherited land “de Noharia flumine usque in Nochariolam” but died childless, his lands being divided between his brothers[178].
v) ABA . The Codex de Roda names "Regemundo ac domno Galindo seu domna Aba" as the children of "Uernardus" and his wife[179].«s87» 
Bernardo I Conde de Ribagorza (I14978)
 
243 “BERNHARD (after 990-29 Jun 1059, bur Lüneburg St Michael). The Annalista Saxo names "duce Bernhardo, filius eius Bernhardus" when recording his succession to his father in 1011 as BERNHARD II Herzog in Sachsen. As "Bernard Duke of Westfalia", he signed the 1013 document of Heinrich II King of Germany under which the king renewed his settlement of a dispute over Gandersheim, listed first among the lay signatories. The Annalista Saxon records that he rebelled against Emperor Heinrich in 1020, captured "Scalkesburh", but withdrew and was restored to his properties after the intercession of the empress. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" renewed the privileges of Kloster Fulda by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated 1020, witnessed by "Godifridi ducis, Berinhardi ducis, Thiederici ducis, Welphonis comitis, Cunonis comitis, Kunrati comitis, Ottonis comitis, Adilbrahtis comitis, Bobonis comitis, Friderici comitis, Bezilini comitis, Ezonis comitis palatini", the order of witnesses presumably giving some idea of the relative importance of these named nobles at the court of Emperor Heinrich II at the time. Adam of Bremen records the death in 1059 of "Bernardus Saxonum dudux". The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "29 Jun" of "Bernhardus dux". m ([1020]) EILIKA von Schweinfurt, daughter of HEINRICH von Schweinfurt Markgraf der Nordgau & his wife Gerberga [von Hammerstein] ([1000]-10 Dec after [1055/56]). The Annalista Saxo names "Eilica…filia marchionis Heinrici de Suinvorde" as wife of "Bernhardus iunior". The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "10 Dec" of "Eila ducissa". Duke Bernhard II & his wife had five children:
a) ORDULF [Otto] ([1020]-28 Mar 1072, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis). The Annalista Saxo names "Odulfum ducem et Herimannum comitem" as the two sons of Duke Bernhard & his wife, when recording that he succeeded his father in 1059 as ORDULF Herzog von Sachsen.
b) HERMANN (-1086). The Annalista Saxo names "Odulfum ducem et Herimannum comitem" as the two sons of Duke Bernhard & his wife, specifying that the latter died "sine legitimis liberis". In a later passage it records the death in 1086 of "Herimannus comes, patruus Magni ducis, sine legitimis liberis". Graf 1059/80.
c) GERTRUD of Saxony (Schweinfurt [1028]-Veurne 4 Aug 1113, bur Veurne). The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Bernardi Saxonum comitis Gertrudem" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "viduam Florentii comitis Fresonum". The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Floris and "Gertrudim filiam Hermanni ducis Saxonum", "Hermanni" being an error for "Bernardi" as the former would be impossible chronologically. "Gertrudis" is named as wife of "Roberti Frisonis" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which does not give her origin The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum" The Annales Egmundani specify that Robert acquired the "comitatum Hollandiæ et Fresiæ" by marrying Gertrud. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XV Kal Aug" of "Gertrudis comitissa". Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV die Aug" of "Gheertrudis…" and her burial in Flanders. m firstly ([1050]) FLORIS I Count of Holland, son of DIRK III "Hierosolymita" Count of Holland & his wife Othelindis [von Haldensleben-Nordmark] ([1025]-murdered near Hememert 28 Jun 1061). m secondly (1063) ROBERT de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN V "le Pieux/Insulanus" Count of Flanders & his wife Adela de France ([1035]-13 Oct 1093). Count of Holland 1062-1071, during the minority of his stepson. He succeeded his nephew 1071 as ROBERT I "le Frison" Count of Flanders.
d) [HEDWIG (-1 Jun [after 1100]). The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum". It is not certain to whom "Angelberti marchionis" refers, but it is possible that it is Engelbert [I] Graf von Sponheim whose father was Markgraf. It is not certain to whom "Angelberti marchionis" refers, but it is possible that it is Engelbert [I] Graf von Sponheim whose father was Markgraf. WWegener points out that a Saxon origin for Engelbert is consistent with the introduction of the names Bernhard and Heinrich into the family of the Grafen von Sponheim. However, if she was the daughter of Duke Bernhard, she must have been born iin the range [1020/40]. This seems early in light of the known career dates of Engelbert [I]'s children. Engelbert's wife is named "Hadwich cometissa Engelberti relicta" in the Fundatio Sancti Pauli in Carinthia. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "Kal Jun" of "Hadewich coma". m ENGELBERT [I] Graf von Sponheim und im Pustertal, son of SIEGFRIED Graf von Sponheim und im Pustertal ex-Markgraf & his wife Richgard [Sieghardinger] (-1 Apr 1096).]
e) IDA (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur). The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum". "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensisis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given. On her marriage, she brought her husband extensive lands north-east of Bouillon which later formed the county of Laroche. According to the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines, her husband's claim to Bouillon was through the property brought by his wife. m firstly as his second wife, FREDERIC II Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy, son of FFRIEDRICH Graf im Moselgau, Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy [Luxembourg] & his wife [-- von Hammerstein] [Konradiner] (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo). m secondly ([1065/66]) ALBERT III Comte de Namur, son of ALBERT II Comte de Namur & his wife Regilindis of Lower Lotharingia (before 10 Aug 1035-22 Jun 1102).”«s87» 
Bernhard II Herzog in Sachsen (I15485)
 
244 “BERNHARD Billung, son of HERMANN Billung dux in Saxony & his [first/second] wife [Oda ---/Hildesuit---] (-Corvey 9 Feb 1011, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis). The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Bennonis ducis, qui et Bernhardus et Liudigeri comitis et Machtildis comitisse" as brothers and sister of "domna Suanehildis [filia] Herimanni ducis de Liuniburh". He succeeded as BERNHARD I Herzog in Sachsen. Adam of Bremen names "dux Benno et Sigafridus marchio" when recording their victory against the Vikings at Stade. The passage is undated but adjacent paragraphs suggest that it relates to an incident in the late 908s/early 990s. The necrology of Fulda records the death in 1011 of "Berinhart dux". The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "9 Feb" of "Bernhardus dux". The Vita Meinwerci records the death "Id Feb" of "Bernhardus dux Saxonicus, filius Herimanni ducis".
m ([990]) HILDEGARD von Stade, daughter of HEINRICH I "dem Kahlen" Graf von Stade [Nordmark] & his second wife Hildegard [von Reinhausen] ([974/77]-3 Oct 1011, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis). The primary source which confirms Hildegarde's parentage and her marriage has not so far been identified. The necrology of Lüneburg records the death "3 Oct" of "Hildegarth ducissa".
Mistress (1): ---. The name and origin of Duke Bernhard's mistress are not known.
Duke Bernhard I & his wife had [five] children:
1. HERMANN (-young). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not so far been identified.
2. BERNHARD (after 990-29 Jun 1059, bur Lüneburg St Michael).
3. THIETMAR (-killed in battle Pöhlde 1 Oct 1048). The Vita Meinwerci names "Thietmarus senior frater Bernhardi ducis Saxonie" when recording his donation to Paderborn, stating that his brother Bernhard was his heir, witnessed by "Udone, Herimamanno, Bernhardo, Liudero comitibus". Thietmar names "Thietmar, Duke Bernhard's brother" when recording that he despoiled Meinwerk Bishop of Paderborn. "Thietmarus comes" is named brother of Bernhard in the Annalista Saxo, which records that he was killed in a duel at the court of Emperor Heinrich. m ---. The name of Thietmar's wife is not known. Thietmar & his wife had one child:
a) THIETMAR . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not so far been identified. Outlaw 1053.
4. GODESDIN (-30 Jun after 1040). "Abbess Godesti" is named sister of Duke Bernhard by Thietmar. [Abbess of Metelen 993]. Abbess of Herford 1002-1040. She founded the Abbey of Herford 2 Jun 1011.
5. [MATHILDE (-Gernrode 28 Apr 1014). Thietmar records the death of "my cousin Mathilde" on 28 Apr 1014, noting that "she had long resided at Gernrode with Abbess Hathui to whom she was related by blood". There is no direct proof that Mathilde was the daughter of Duke Bernhard I. However, Duke Bernhard's children are the only cousins of Thietmar who appear to have been related to Hathui, who as shown above was probably the daughter of Wichmann [I].]
Duke Bernhard I & Mistress (1) had one illegitimate daughter:
6. EMMA . "Otto…rex" gave property "Hedun in pago Hedergo et in comitatu Hoiconis comitis" to "Imme sanctimoniali filiæ Bernhardi ducis" by charter dated 26 Oct 995. This date appears early for Emma to have been Duke Bernhard's legitimate daughter by his marriage. It is therefore assumed that she was illegitimate.”«s87» 
Bernhard I Herzog in Sachsen (I14083)
 
245 “BERTHA . "Rodulfus rex et Mathildis soror eius" are named children of "Mathilde…filia…Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Mathilde was mother of Berta who was mother of "Geroldus Genevensis". m ---. The name of Bertha's husband is not known. Bertha & her husband had two children:
i) GERAUD (-1061 or after).
ii) CONON (-1107). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Bishop of Maurienne 1088.”«s87» 
Bertha (I15681)
 
246 “BILLUNG . Princeps. m AEDA, daughter of --- & his wife --- [daughter of Pepin King of Italy] ([798/810]-). The Carmen de Primordiis Cœnobii Gandersheimensis names the wife of "Liudulfus" as "Oda…Francorum…de stirpe potentum, filia Billungi…atque Aedæ"[178]. Her precise origin is mentioned in the charter dated 885 by which "Oda comitissa, Pipini regis Italiæ ex filia neptis, Hliudolfi Ducis vidua" founded Kloster Calbe an der Milde, although the accuracy of this document is not known[179]. Billung & his wife had one child.”«s87» Billung Princeps (I13616)
 
247 “Birgit gifta seg opp igjen med Knut Olsen.

Kilder: Folk og fortid i Hol.”«s50» 
TORGEIRSDTR NEDRE MYR, Birgit (I9791)
 
248 “BODO (-after Nov 950). The Historia Nivernensium Comitum names "Bodonem" as the son of "Hildegarii nepoti Landrico" and his wife "[ex] stirpis Andegavorum", specifying that "Bodo de Montibus" was his godfather and that Bodo built "castellum…Moncellis"[1070]. Seigneur de Monceaux-le-Comte. "Bodo" donated property "in pago Matisconense in villa Lanco" acquired from "Rainaldo cognate meo" to Cluny "pro receptione filii mei" by charter dated Nov 950, subscribed by "Gisoni, Attoni, Landrici", although it is not certain that this is the same Bodo. Although the identity of "Rainaldo cognate meo" has not been established, the name suggests a family connection with the Comte de Nevers. Settipani suggests that he was related to the Comtes d'Anjou, through Bodo's mother. m ---. The name of Bodo's wife is not known. Bodo & his wife had [two] children:
(a) LANDRY [IV] (-11 May 1028). The Historia Nivernensium Comitum names "Landricus filius Bodonis". He was invested in 990 as Comte de Nevers.
(b) [son . He became a monk at Cluny in Nov 950, assuming that "Bodo", who donated property "in pago Matisconense in villa Lanco" acquired from "Rainaldo cognate meo" to Cluny "pro receptione filii mei" by charter of that date, his father is the same as Bodo de Nevers.]”«s87» 
Bodo Seigneur de Monceaux-le-Comte (I14272)
 
249 “BOSO ([885]-after 936). Liuprand names “Boso ex eodem patre regis Hugonis frater”. Gingins-la-Sarra suggests that this text means that Boso was born from a different marriage of his father. However, the wording could just as easily be interpreted as emphasising that Boso and Hugues were born from the same marriage of their mother. Considering the marriage dates of Boso´s daughters, it is unlikely that he was born before his brother Hugues. Comte d'Avignon et Vaisin 911-931. Comtmte d'Arles 926-931. He was installed by his brother as BOSO Marchese of Tuscany in 931 after Lambert Marchese of Tuscany was deposed and blinded. He rebelled against his brother in 936, encouraged by Willa "uxore sua cupidissima", was captured and deposed. m (separated 936) WILLA, daughter of ---. Willa is named "uxore…Boso Tusciæ provinciæ marchio regis frater" by Liutprand, without giving her origin, when he records the marriage of her daughter Willa in 936. According to Jean-Noël Mathieu, she was Willa, daughter of Rudolf I King of Burgundy & his wife Willa ---, basing this on the fact that she was sent to Burgundy when she was separated from her husband in 936, this event being recorded by Liutprand, but there are presumably other plausible explanations for her destination. Comte Boso & his wife had four daughters:
i) BERTA (-after 18 Aug 965). "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso and Willa by Liutprand, who in a later passage names Berta as "Bosonis Arelatensis comitis viduæ" and mentions her marriage soon after the death of her first husband to Raymond, by virtue of which she was deemed guilty of incest. "Raymundus comes" names "…Bertanæ et Raymundo filio meo…" in his 961 testament. "Berta…comitissa et filius meus Raimundus…comes" donated property "in comitatu Nemausense" to Nîmes Notre-Dame by charter dated 7 Sep 961. "Berta…comitissa" donated property "in comitatu Nemausense" to Nîmes Notre-Dame by charter dated 18 Aug 965, subscribed by "Raimundus filius meus". She is cited aed at the time of a synod held after 1004 (maybe [1012]). m firstly ([928]) BOSO Comte in Upper Burgundy, son of RICHARD "le Justicier" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Adelais d'Auxerre [Welf] (-Sep 935, bur Reims, église de l'abbaye de Saint-Rémi). m secondly ([936]) RAYMOND I Comte de Rouergue Marquis de Septimanie, son of ERMENGAUD Comte de Rouergue & his wife Adelaida --- (-killed [Feb 961/7 Oct 962]). Duke of Aquitaine 936.
ii) WILLA (-after 963). "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso and Willa by Liutprand. Willa is named "rex Hugo neptim suam…ex Willa uxore sua Boso Tusciæ provinciæ marchio regis frater" by Liutprand when he records her marriage to Berengario. She ordered the imprisonment of Adelheid, widow of her husband's predecessor Lothar [de Provence] King of Italy. She retreated with her husband to the fortress of San Leo in the face of Otto King of Germany's invasion, but was captured and taken to Bamberg with Berengario. Regino records that Willa became a nun after her husband died before he was buried. m ([930/31]) BERENGARIO II Marchese di Ivrea, son of ADALBERTO I Conte e Marchese di Ivrea & his first wife Gisela di Friulia ([900]-in prison Bamberg 6 Jul 966). He was proclaimed BERENGARIO II King of Italy in Dec 950.
iii) RICHILDE . "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso & Willa by Liutprand.
iv) GISELA . "Bertam, Willam, Richildam et Gislam" are named (in order) as the four daughters of Boso & Willa by Liutprand.”«s87» 
Boso Marchese of Tuscany (I13863)
 
250 “BOSO, son of --- (-before 855). Comte d'Arles. Count in Italy.
m ---. The name of Boso's wife is not known.
Boso & his wife had [four] children:
1. [BOSO ([820/25]-[874/78]). There is no proof that Boso, husband of the adulterous Engiltrudis, was the son of Boso Comte d'Arles. Regino refers to "fratribus Thietbirgæ reginæ" referring her case to Pope Nicholas after her repudiation by her husband King Lothar II[86], which shows that she had at least two brothers, one of whom may therefore have been Boso. Count in Italy. m ([845/50], deserted [856/57]) ENGILTRUDIS, daughter of MATFRIED [I] Comte d'Orléans & his wife --- ([825//30]-). The Annales Fuldenses record that "Engildrudam filiam quondam Matifredi comite" left "Busone proprio viro" and wandered for seven years. Regino names "Engildrudam quoque uxorem quondam Bosonis comitis" when recording her excommunication in 866 after deserting her husband and fleeing to France with "Wangerum suum vassallum".] Boso & his wife had two children:
a) two daughters. They disputed their mother's inheritance with their illegitimate half-brother Godefroi. Pope John VIII requested "Ludovicum Germani Regem" to restore the property of "Bosonis C filiabus" in 878.
2. HUBERT (-killed in battle Orbe 866). Regino records that "Hucbertus abba, frater Thietbirgæ reginæ" rebelled against King Lothar in 866. Duke of Transjurania. Abbot of St Maurice.
3. TEUTBERGA (-before 875). The Annales Lobienses name "Tietberga, sorore Hucberti abbatis" as lawful wife of "Lotharius". The Annales Bertiniani name "Teutbergam" as "materteram suam [=Bosone filio Buvini comitis]". The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Thieberga regina legitima uxore [Lotharii]", specifying that she relied on the advice of "Bosonis comitis" at the time of her repudiation, although her relationship to him is not specified. Herimannus names "Tiohtpirga uxore legitima" of King Lothaire II when recording that he repudiated her. She protected the wife of Boso Count in Italy after she deserted her husband. She was repudiated on the grounds of her alleged incest with her brother Hubert. Her husband kept her prisoner after separating from her. The Annales Bertiniani record that "uxor Lotharii" fled to "fratrem suum Hucbertum in regno Karli" in 860. She escaped in 860 and sought refuge with Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, who gave her the abbey of Avenay in the diocese of Reims. The Annales Bertiniani records that "uxore [Lothario]" gave support to "uxori Bosonis et Balduino qui filiam eius [=Karoli regis] furatus fuerat in uxorem". Abbess of Sainte Glossinde at Metz 869. "Heccardus comes" names "…Teutbergane uxore Lotharii…" among the beneficiaries under his testamentary disposition dated to [Jan 876]. It is not certain that this refers to the separated wife of King Lothar II, but no other "Teutberga/Lothaire" couple has been identified at the time. If this identification is correct, it suggests a family relationship between Teutberga and Ekkehard, which has not yet been identified. m ([855], separated 857, repudiated 860) LOTHAIRE II King of Lotharingia, son of Emperor LOTHAIRE I King of Lotharingia & his wife Ermengarde de Tours (-Piacenza 8 Aug 868).
4. daughter. The existence of this sister of Teutberga is indicated by the Annales Bertiniani naming "Teutbergam" as "materteram suam [=Bosone filio Buvini comitis]". m BUVINUS [Bouvin], son of [RICHARD Comte d'Amiens & his wife ---] (-[863/69]).”«s87» 
Boso Comtes d’Arles, Count in Italy (I13878)
 
251 “BOSON [I] "le Vieux" (-before 974). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bosonis vetuli de Marca" as father of "Helias Petragoricensi comite". The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Marchiæ…filius Bernardi, qui fuit Audeberti, qui fuit Bosonis, qui Sulpicii, qui fuit Godfredi primi comitis de Karrofo". Comte de la Marche. m AINA [Emma] de Périgord, daughter of [BERNARD I Comte d'Angoulême et de Périgord & his first wife Berthe ---]. Ademar names "sorore Beernardi…Emma" as wife of "Bosonis Vetuli" and mother of "Aldebertus comes…Petragoricensis", although this appears difficult to sustain chronologically given the likely birth date range of Bernard in [892/95] and the likely death date of Bernard's father Guillaume in [918]. It is more likely that "sorore" was an error for "filia", unless Aina was Bernard's uterine sister by an unidentified second marriage of his mother. If Aina was the daughter of Bernard, her naming one of her sons Gausbert suggests that his first wife was her mother, Bernard's son Gausbert being one of his older children, no doubt also born from this first marriage. Comte Boson I & his wife had five children:
(a) HELIE [I] (-Villebois [975]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Bosonis vetuli de Marca" as father of "Helias Petragoricensi comite", specifying that he and "fratre suo Aldeberto" were captured by Guy Vicomte de Limoges and imprisoned "in castro Montiniaco", but that Hélie escaped and died soon after "in via Romæ peregrinus". He succeeded his father [before 974] as Comte de la Marche. The Miracula Sancti Bernardi names "Boso marcham ipsius possidens regionis…Elias, Bosonis filius" when recording his siege of "castrum…Brucia", held by "Giraldus Lemovicinæ urbis vicecomes".
(b) AUDEBERT [I] (-killed in battle Charroux 997, bur Charroux Monastery). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "Audeberti comitis Marchiæ…filius Bernardi, qui fuit Audeberti, qui fuit Bosonis, qui Sulpicii, qui fuit Godfredi primi comitis de Karrofo". He succeeded his father [before 974] as Comte de la Marche . He succeeded [after 975] as Comte de Périgord, inherited from his mother's family.
(c) BOSON [II] (-[27 Dec 1003/before 1012], bur Périgueux). His paternity is confirmed by the Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes which records that "Aldebertus comes…Petragoricensis" was succeeded by "Boso frater eius". He succeeded his brother in 997 as Comte de la Marche, Comte de Périgord.
(d) GAUSBERT (-after 997). Ademar names "Gauzberto fratre Eliæ comitis", specifying that he was captured and blinded by the Poitevins. Monk 997. "Boso comes" donated property to Uzerche, for the soul of "fratris mei Gauberti…Ildeberti fratris mei memoria", by charter dated 998.
(e) MARTIN (-1000). The Chronicon Episcoporum Petragoricensis names "Martin" as son of "Bosonis Vetuli comitis Petragoricensis et Marchiæ…natus ex sorore Bernardi comitis Petragoricensis, Eyna" when recording that he succeeded as Bishop of Périgueux and died in 1000.”«s87» 
Boson I “le Vieux” Comte de la Marche (I14681)
 
252 “BOSON, son of ROTBALD [I] d'Agel & his wife --- (-[965/67]). "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam" restored property to Saint-Victor by charter dated Mar 965. Comte d'Avignon 935. Comte d'Arles 949.
m CONSTANTIA, daughter of --- (-after May [963]). Constantia is named as the wife of Comte Boson, and mother of Guillaume and Rotbald, in the Cartulaire de Montmajour dated May [963]. Her affiliation is unknown. Chaume proposed that she was Constantia, daughter of Charles Constantin Comte de Vienne, for onomastic reasons only on the basis that names with the root "Constant-" were unknown in western royal genealogy before Charles Constantin himself. This supposition is, however, inccorrect as numerous charters of the monastery of Cluny dated between 891 and 946 include the name "Constantia", and many others during the same period the names "Constantius" and "Constantinus". Poly suggests that Constantia, wife of Count Boson II, was the sister rather than daughter of Charles Constantin, but this appears to be more difficult to sustain chronologically.
Boson & his wife had two children.”«s87» 
Boso or Boson of Arles (I13264)
 
253 “Both were received into the church at South Berwick 24 April 1720.”«s18» FURBUSH, Daniel (I1632)
 
254 “BRIAN Boroma, son of CEINNÉITIG & his wife --- ([941]-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014). The Annals of Ulster record the birth in 941 of "Brian son of Cennéitig”. The Annals of the Four Masters record the birth in 925 of “Brian son of CCeinnedigh” adding that this was “24 years before Maelseachlainn son of Domnhall”, although this proposed date of birth of Brian is improbable considering the date of his death. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Brian mac Cendéidigh” attacked “Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island)…[and] therein the Foreigners of Limerick…Imar, and Olaf one of his sons and Dubchenn his other son” in [975/76]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Brian son of Cennétig” killed “Mael Muad king of Desmumu” in babattle in 978. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Brian son of Cennétig” defeated and killed “Mael Muad son of Bran king of Caisel” at “the battle of Belach Lechta” in 978. King of Munster. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Brian son of Cennétig…and Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall king of Temuir” divided Ireland between them in 997 “Leth Cuinn to Mael Sechnaill and Leth Moga to Brian”. High King of Ireland 1002. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Brían Boroma regnat” in [999/1000]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records that "Brian rex Hiberniæ" was killed "1014 IX Kal Mai". Orkneyinga Saga records that Sigurd Jarl of Orkney went to Ireland “five years after the Battle of Svoldur” to support “King Sigtrygg Silk-Beard” against “King Brian of Ireland”, and left “his elder sons in charge of the earldom”, but was killed in the battle in which King Brian was killed. The Annals of Ulster record that "Brian son of Ceinnéitig son of Lorcán king of Ireland and Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall king of Temair" led an army to “Áth Cliath” in 1014, adding that Brian was killed in the battle. The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Brian son of Ceinneidigh monarch of Ireland in the 88th year of his age” was killed in 1013 in the battle [of Clontarf].
m [firstly] ---. The name of Brian´s first wife is not known. However, it is probable that he was married before his marriage to Gormlaith in order to have grandson who was killed in battle in 1014.
m [secondly] (after 981, [separated]) as her second husband, GORMLAITH, widow of OLAV Sihtricsson King of Dublin, daughter of MORUGH MacFinn King of Leinster & his wife --- (-1030). The Annals of Tigernach record the death in 1030 of “Gormlaith, daughter of Murchad son of Fland” mother of “Sitric son of Olaf king of the Foreigners and of Donnchad son of Brian king of Munster”. Brian must have separated from his wife Gormlaith if the reference to his wife Dub is correct, unless the marriages were polygamous. She married thirdly, as his [third] wife, Maelsechnaill King of Ireland. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 1030 of “Gormlaith daughter of Murchadh son of Finn, mother of the king of the foreigners Sitric, Donnchadh son of Brian king of Munster, and Conchobhar son of Maeleachlainn king of Teamhair”.
m [thirdly] DUB Chablaig, daughter of [CATHAL King of Connaught & his wife ---] (-1009). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1009 of "Dub Chablaig daughter of the king of Connacht…wife of Brian son of Ceinnéitig". The name of her father is not given. However, it is reasonable to suppose that he was Cathal who was king of Connaught at the time.
Brian & his first wife had one child:
1. MURCHAD (-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014). The Annals of Ulster record that "Brian son of Ceinnéitig son of Lorcán king of Ireland and Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall king of Temair" led an army to “Áth Cliath” in 1014, adding that Briaian was killed in the battle “and his son Murchad and the latter´s son…Tairdelbach”. The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Murchadh son of Brain heir apparent of the sovereignty of Ireland in the 63rd year of his age” was killed in 1013 in the battle [of Clontarf]. m ---. The name of Murchad & his wife is not known. Murchad & his wife had one child:
a) TORDELBACH (-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014). The Annals of Ulster record that "Brian son of Ceinnéitig son of Lorcán king of Ireland and Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall king of Temair" led an army to “Áth Cliath” in 1014, adding that Brian was killed in the battle “and his son Murchad and the latter´s son…Tairdelbach”].
Brian & his [first/second] wife had one child:
2. DOMNALL (-1011). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1011 of "Domnall son of Brian”[856]. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 1010 of “Domhnall son of Brian son of Ceinneidigh, son of the king of Ireland”. m ---. The name of Domnall´s wife is not known. Domnall & his wife had one child:
a) TOIRDELBACH ([1008/09]-Cenn Coradh 14 Jul 1086). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "the son of Domnall son of Brian” killed “Ua Donnocáin king of Ara” in 1031. The Annals of Ulster record that "Ua Briain…Toirdelbach” killed “Ua Donnocáin king of Ara Tire” in 1031. King of Munster 1064. High King of Ireland 1072.
b) DIARMAIT (-killed 1051). The Annals of Tigernach record that “Diarmait son of Domnall son of Brian” was killed by “Murchad son of Brián” in 1051. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1051 of "Diarmait Ua Briain…slain by Murchad Ua Briain”.
Brian & his second wife had two children:
3. TADHG (-killed 1023). The Annals of Tigernach record that “Tadg son of Brian Boroma” was killed by “the Eili instigated by his brother…Dondchad” in [1021/23][862]. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1023 of "Tadc son of Brian killed by the Éile”.
4. [son . It is probable that Derborgaill´s father was one of the sons of Brian who are named above, but the primary source which names him as not yet been identified. The mother of this son was most probably Brian´s wife Gormlaith as his daughter Derborgaill had a daughter of this name, which appears to restrict his identity to Tadhg or Donnchad.] m ---. One child:
a) DERBORGAILL (-Imlech 1080). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1080 of "Derbhforgaill daughter of Brian´s son, wife of Diarmait son of Mael na mBó…in Imlech”. m DERMOT MacMailnamo [Diarmait mac Máel na mBó] King of Leinster and of Ireland (-killed in battle Odba 7 Feb 1072).
Brian & his [second/third] wife had [four] children:
5. DONNCHAD (-Rome after 1064). The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records that "Donchal filius suis annis 51" succeeded his father "Brian rex Hiberniæ" in 1014, although the reference to his age must clearly be incorrect. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Catharnach son of Aed of the Húi Caisín” attacked “Donnchad son of Brian” in [1017/19] and cut off his right hand. King of Munster. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Donnchad son of Brián Boroma king of Munster” was “dethroned” in 1064 and “went to Rome on a pilgrimage” and died there “in the monastery of Stephen”. m firstly ---, daughter of MURCHAD Mac Finn & his wife --- (-1030). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1030 of "the daughter of Murchad son of Finn, queen of Mumu”. m secondly --- [of Waterford], daughter of RAGNALL [King of Waterford] & his wife ---. The Annals of Inisfallen record the marriage in 1032 of "Donnchadh son of Brian” and “the daughter of Ragnall”. It is not certain that King Donnchad´s father-in-law was the king of Waterford. Donnchad & his first wife had one child:
a) LATHIR (-1028). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1028 of "Lathir daughter of Donnchadh…on her pilgrimage in Corcach”.
Donnchad & his [first/second] wife had three children:
b) three sons . The Annals of Inisfallen record that "three sons of Donnchadh son of Brian took a great prey in Corcu Modruad, both cows and booty” in 1054].
6. BÉ Binn (-Armagh 1073). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1073 of "Bé Binn daughter of Brian…on pilgrimage in Ard Macha”.
7. [--- . m ---.] Two children:
a) two sons (-killed Man 1073). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1073 of "Sitriuc son of Amlaib and two grandsons of Brian…killed in Man”.
8. SADB (-1048). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1048 of "Sadb daughter of Brian”.
Brian & his [third wife] had one child:
9. MURCHAD Ua Brian (-killed in battle 1068). Bearing in mind Murchad´s date of death, he must have been born late in his father´s life and therefore from his father´s third marriage, unless he was illegitimate. The Annals of Tigernach recorrd that “Diarmait son of Domnall son of Brian” was killed by “Murchad son of Brián” in 1051. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1051 of "Diarmait Ua Briain…slain by Murchad Ua Briain”. The Annals of Ulster records that "Toirdelbach uua Briain” defeated “Murchad ua Briain” in 1055. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Murchad Ua Briain was attacked in Corcu Modruad and Tairdelbach inflicted a great slaughter upon him” in 1055. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Murchad Ua Briain” killed “Ua Nechtain” in 1061 “in Corrdam”. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1068 of "Murchad Ua Briain royal heir of Ireland and the king of Ireland´s son…slain by the men of Tethba”. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1068 of "Murchad ua Briain heir designate of Mumu…killed by the men of Tethba”. m ---. The name of Murchad’s wife is not known. Murchad & his wife had one child:
a) BRIAN (-1118). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "the son of Murchad Ua Briain, Brian, went to Leth Cuinn, having been put away by Muirchertach Ua Briain” in 1111. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Brian son of Murchad” was imprisoned in 1114. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Brian son of Murchad Ua Briain was slain by Tadc son of Mac Carthaig, the Desmumu, and the Uí Briain” in 1118.”«s87» 
BOROMA, Brian King of Munster, High King of Ireland (I15810)
 
255 “Bruk nr. 1, Tokheim.

Tokheim var eitt gardsbruk fram til 1732, og ei grein av storættene i fjorden synest å hatt heimstaden sin der frå mellomalderen av.

Ivar på Tokheim er skattlagd i 1521 og høyrer mellom dei største tiendytarane. Ein Orm er også skattlagd, anten far eller son til Ivar som er bror til til Torbjørn Måge, og då Ivar og Orm er gamle Måge-namn, har me her med ætlingar av Måge-ætta å gjera. Ætta hevda seg som den fremste i Odda.

(Sjå Odda, Ullensvang, Kinsarvik bd. 1, s 301)”«s45» 
ORMSEN TOKHEIM, Ivar (I9348)
 
256 “Bruker på Torsnes ca 1200.13

Om forfedrene til den gamle Torsnesætta
I eit diplom frå 1409, presentert av Lars Hamre i ein artikkel i “Norsk Slektshistorisk Tidsskrift” i 1949, kunngjer seks lagrettemenn at folket på Torsnes har eigd ein skogteig i Knarrevik mellom Årvik og Årsand. Her vert ramsa opp slekta til Bård og Sigurd Guttormsøner i seks tidlegare generasjonar: 1. Viking, 2. Inga, dotter hans, 3. Guttorm Kalvson, son hennar, 4. Sigurd Guttormson, 5. Guttorm Sigurdson, 6 Sigurd Guttormson og 7. Bård og Sigurd Guttormsøner. Det er såleis sannsynleg at den gamle Torsnesætta kan førast tilbake til omkring 1200. Merk at generasjon nr. 1, 2, 3, 5 og (kanskje) 6 ovanfor ikkje er kjende frå andre kjelder.13”«s45» 
VIKING PÅ TORSNES, ? (I9362)
 
257 “Built house now owned by his daughter, Martha E. Blossom.”--from a 1909 publication

1850 Census: MA: Norfolk: Cohasset: pg. 137, Image 273:
Martin Bailey, age 35, carpenter, $1000;
Louisa, age 33;
Martha, age 9;
Louisa, age 7;
Henry M., age 5.

1860 Census: MA: Norfolk: Cohasset: p. 252:
Martin K. Bailey, age 45, carpenter, $1000, $300, born in MA;
Lois H., age 45, born in ME;
Louisa, age 18, born in MA;
Martha E., age 16, born in MA.

1870 Census: MA: Norfolk: Cohasset: p. 256A:
Bailey, Martin K., age 55, house carpenter, $3000, born in MA;
Louisa H., age 55, keeping house, born in ME. 
BAILEY, Martin Kent (I386)
 
258 “CADELL ap Brochwell. King of Powys.
1. CYNGEN (-Rome 854). He succeeded his father as CYNGEN King of Powys. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 854 in Rome of "Cinnen rex Pouis".
2. NEST . m MERFYN ap Gwriad Frych ("the Freckled") King of Gwynedd, son of GWRIAD King of Gwynedd & his wife Ethyll heiress of Gwynedd (-844).”«s87» 
AP BROCHWELL, Cadell King of Powys (I13846)
 
259 “Carrie was an accomplished mjusician. She went to Boston at age 25 and later to New YHork where she sang in the Brooklyn Theater.”«s17» PARLIN, Carrie (I5622)
 
260 “CECILIA de Normandie (Normandy [1054/55]-Caen 3 Jul 1126, bur Caen, Abbey of Holy Trinity). She is named first in his list of King William's daughters by William of Malmesbury and by Matthew of Paris. Orderic Vitalis, in his list of the king'g's children which appears to place both the sons and daughters together in birth order, unfortunately omits Cecilia, rendering it particularly difficult to decide if she was older or younger than her brother Richard. Guillaume de Jumièges namees Cecile as eldest daughter, stating that she was a nun at the convent of Holy Trinity at Caen. Her parents offered her as an oblate to the nunnery of the Holy Trinity, Caen (founded by her mother) 18 Jun 1066, probably in part to obtain divine blessing for his project to invade England. She became a nun there in 1075, her tutor being Arnoul de Choques who later became Chancellor to her brother Robert "Curthose" Duke of Normandy, and subsequently Patriarch of Jerusalem. She succeeded Mathilde as Abbess of Holy Trinity at Caen in 1113. The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records the death in 1126 of "Cecilia Abbatissa, Willelmi Regis filia".”«s87» Cecilia or Cecily Abbess of Holy Trinity, Caen (I13293)
 
261 “CEINNÉITIG (-951). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which record that "Brian son of Ceinnéitig son of Lorcán king of Ireland and Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall king of Temair" led an army to “Áth Cliath” in 1014. The Annals oof the Four Masters record that “Ceallachan of Caiseal” defeated “Ceinneidigh son of Lorcan at Magh-duin” in 942. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 951 of "Cennétig son of Lorcán, royal heir of Caisel”. m ---. The name of Ceinnéitig & his wife is not known. Ceinnéitig & his wife had six children:
i) ECHTIGERN (-killed 948). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Conghalach” killed “two sons of Ceinneidigh son of Lorcan…Echtighern and Donnchuan” in 948.
ii) DONN CUAN (-killed 948). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Conghalach” killed “two sons of Ceinneidigh son of Lorcan…Echtighern and Donnchuan” in 948. m ---. The name of Donn Cuan´s wife is not known. Donn Cuan & his wife had three children:
(a) CONANG (-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "the princes of Mumu round Conaing son of Donn Cúán” were killed at the battle of Clontarf in 1014. The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Conaing son of Donncuan, the son of Brian´s brother” was killed in 1013 in the battle [of Clontarf]. m ---. The name of Conang´s wife is not known. Conang & his wife had [three] children:
(1) MATHGAMAIN (-[1017/19]). Crown Prince of Munster. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Mathgamain son of Conang son of Donn Cuan, crownprince of Munster” died in [1017/18]. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1019 of "Mathgamain son of Conaing”. m ---. The name of Mathgamain´s wife is not known. Mathgamain & his wife had one child:
a. AEDH (-1011). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1011 of "Aed son of Mathgamain”. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 1010 of “Aedh son of Mathgamain, royal heir of Caiseal”.
(2) [--- . m ---.]
a. [EDRU Hua Conaing (-killed 1032). The Annals of Tigernach record that “Edru Hua Conaing crownprince of Munster” was killed by “the community of Emly” in 1032.]
(3) DUNADACH . The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Ua Dúnchada and Dúnadach son of Conang” plundered “Cell Mo-Chellóc” in 1015.
(b) CEINNETIG . His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which names "Aed son of Ceinnétig son of Donn Cuan, chief of the Clann Tairdelbaig” when recording his death. m ---. The name of Ceinnetig´s wife is not known. Ceinnetig & his wife had one child:
(1) AEDH (-killed 1054). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1054 of "Aed son of Ceinnétig son of Donn Cuan, chief of the Clann Tairdelbaig…killed by the Connachta”. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1054 of "Aed son of Cennétig…slain” when “Aed Ua Conchobuir” raided “Tratraige” in 1054.
(c) CEILEACHAIR (-1007). The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 1007 of “Ceileachair son of Donncuan son of Ceinneidigh, Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas”.
iii) LACHTNA (-953). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 953 of "Lachtna son of Cennétig son of Lorcán”.
iv) MATHGAMUIN (-killed 976). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Mathgamain son of Cennétig” defeated “the foreigners…at Sulchuait” in 967. King of Munster. The Annals of Ulster record that "Mathgamuin son of Cennétig king of Caisel” was kkilled in 976 by “Mael Muad son of Bran”. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Mathgamain son of Cenn-étig king of Munster” was killed in [974/75] by “Mael-Muad son of Bran king of the Húi Echach (Iveagh)” after being “treacherously delivered up by Donnában son of Cathal king of the Húi Fidgenti”. The name of Mathgamuin´s & his wife is not known. Mathgamuin & his wife had one child:
(a) AEDH (-1011). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Aed son of Mathgamain” was imprisoned by “Brian son of Cennétig” in 986. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1011 of "Aed son of Mathgamain, heir designate of Caisel”.
v) BRIAN Boroma ([941]-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014). The Annals of Ulster record the birth in 941 of "Brian son of Cennéitig”. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Brian mac Cendéidigh” attacked “Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island)…[andd] therein the Foreigners of Limerick…Imar, and Olaf one of his sons and Dubchenn his other son” in [975/76]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Brian son of Cennétig” killed “Mael Muad king of Desmumu” in battle in 978. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Brian son of Cennétig” defeated and killed “Mael Muad son of Bran king of Caisel” at “the battle of Belach Lechta” in 978. King of Munster. High King of Ireland 1002.
vi) MARCAIN (-1010). The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Marcán son of Cennétig took the abbacy of Imlech Ibuir” in 990. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1010 of "Marcáin son of Cennétig, coarb of Colum son of Crimthann”.”«s87» 
Cennétig (I15823)
 
262 “CENWULF (-Basingwerk, Flintshire 821, bur Winchcomb, Gloucestershire). He succeeded [his distant cousin] King Ecgfrith in 796 as CENWULF King of Mercia. Simeon of Durham records that "Coenuulf the father of St Kenelm" succeeded "Ecgfrith" as king of Mercia. Kent revolted in 796, Eadberht "Præn" installing himself as king of Kent. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that King Cenwulf suppressed the rebellion vigorously, led Eadberht "Praen" bound back to Mercia, and appointed his yyounger brother Cuthred as under-king of Kent in 798. He failed to obtain papal support for establishing London as an archiepiscopal see. He revived Mercian expansion into Wales, killed Caradog ap Meirion King of Gwynedd in 798, and raided the district between Clwyd and the Elwy in 816 and Dyfed in 818-819. Eardwulf King of Northumbria invaded Mercia in 801, but peace was imposed following mediation of English bishops and nobles. "Cenuulf rex merciorum" granted freedoms to Glastonnbury Abbey by charter dated 797. Mercian control over Kent, at least during the period 801-811, is demonstrated by "Coenuulfus rex Merciorum" making a joint grant of land in Kent with "Cuthredo fratre meo rege Cantuariorum" dated 801, "Coenulffi regis Merciorum" subscribing three charters of "Cuthredus rex Cantiæ" dated 805, and "Coenwulf rex Merciorum" granting land at Rochester, Kent to bishop Beornmod by charter dated 811 (subscribed by, among others, "Sigered rex", "Beornnoth duxux" and "Eadberht dux", none of whom have been identified). A dispute with Wulfred Archbishop of Canterbury concerning the king's right to make certain religious appointments appears to have led to the former's suspension from office from 817 to 821. [m firstly ---. The evident age difference between King Cenwulf's known children Cwenthryth and Cynehelm suggests that they were probably born from different marriages although this has not been corroborated from any primary source so far consulted.] m [secondly] ÆLTHRYTH, daughter of --- (-821 or after). "Æthrith/Ælbthryth regina" subscribed charters of King Cenwulf in 804 and 811, and "Eldredia regina" a charter dated 821. King Cenwulf & his [first] wife had [one] child:
a) CWENTHRYTH . William of Malmesbury names "Quendrida" as the older sister of St Kenelm, whom his father had entrusted to this sister for his education. "Quoenthryth filia regis" subscribed a charter of "Coenwulf rex Merciorum" dated 811. She was appointed Abbess of Minster-in-Thanet, by her father. William of Malmesbury states that she murdered her brother Cynehelm.
King Cenwulf & his [second] wife had [three] children:
b) CYNEHELM [Kenelme] ([806/11]-murdered [821/22], bur [Winchcombe, Gloucestershire]). He is named as son of King Cenwulf by William of Malmesbury. "Cynehelm dux" subscribed the charter of "Coenwulf rex Merciorum" dated 811. Ingulph's Chronicicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "his son Saint Kenelm, a boy then seven years old" succeeded "Kenulph…king of the Mercians" but was murdered "through the treachery of his sister Quendreda" within a few months of the death of his father and buried beside his father, although his age must be underestimated in this source if he is the same person who subscribed the 811 charter of King Cenwulf. His paternity is corroborated by "Kenelmus filius regis" subscribing a charter of "Kenulfus rex Merciorum" dated 821. William of Malmesbury states that he was brought up by his sister Cwenthryth, but that she ordered his murder. Goscelin of Saint-Bertin wrote his biography Vita S. Kenelmi in the mid-1060s.
c)[EADBERHT . "Eadberht dux" subscribed the charter of "Coenwulf rex Merciorum" dated 811, his name listed directly after "Cynehelm dux" and before "Cyneberht propinquo regis", which suggests a closer relationship to the king than "propinquo", possibly a younger son.]
d) [EADBURGA. Asser records that Alfred's mother-in-law "Edburga of the royal line of Mercia…was a venerable lady and after the decease of her husband, she remained many years a widow, even till her own death". According to Weir, she was perhaps the daughter of Cenwulf King of Mercia but the basis for this speculation is not known. m ÆTHELRED "Mucil" Ealdorman of the Gainas [in Mercia].]”«s87» 
Cenwulf King of Mercia (I13835)
 
263 “CHARLES “Martel”, son of PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal" & his second [wife] Chalpais [Alpais] ([690]-Quierzy-sur-Oise, Aisne 16 or 22 Oct 741, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). The Chronicon Moissiacense names "Karolum" as soon of "Pippinus præfatus princeps…ex alia uxore nomine Alpaigde". He was imprisoned by his father's first wife after his father died. However, the Neustrians revolted against Plectrudis, Charles escaped, was at first defeated by the Neustrianss, but won the battle of Amblève, near Liège, in 716. He was victorious at Vinchy, near Cambrai, 28 May 717 after which Chilperic II King of Neustria fled with his maior domus, leaving Charles unchallenged to succeed as maior domus in Austrasia. "Karolus" donated his part in "villa Bollane" to "monasterium Efternacum" by charter dated dated 23 Feb 717, which names "genitore meo Pippino". He conquered the Saxons in 718 and the Frisians in 719 when he captured Utrecht. He conquered the Neustrians, together with their ally Eudes Duke of Aquitaine, in 719. He released and recognised King Chilperic II, becoming maior domus in Neustria. "Theudericus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to the abbey of St Denis on the request of "Carlo maiorem domus nostro" by charter dated 1 Mar 723. He defeated the Muslim invaders, under Abd-al-Rahman bin Abd Allah al-Ghafiqi [Governor of Andalucía], at Moussais near Poitiers 25 Oct 732. He extended his authority to other French provinces: Hunald Duke of the Aquitanians swore allegiance to him in 736, he subjugated Burgundy and Provence in 736-738. In 737, he omitted to nominate a successor on the death of King Theoderic IV, signalling the effective end of the Merovingian monarchy. The Annales Sancti Amandi record the death "741 Id Oct" of "Karolus dux Francorum". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVII Kal Nov" of "Karolus princeps". The Continuator of Fredegar records the same date for his death and his burial place.
m firstly CHROTHRUDIS, daughter of --- ([690]-[724/25]). The Annales Laureshamenses record the death in 724 of "Hortrudis". The Annales Mosellani record the death in 725 of "Chrothrud". Settipani quotes a name list in the Liber confraternitatum augiensis which reads in part "Karolus maior domus, Pippin rex…Karolus imperator…Ruadtrud, Ruadheid, Svanahild regina, Bertha regina, Hiltikart regina, Fastrat regina, Liutkart regina…". He makes the obvious links between "Karolus maior domus…Svanahild regina", "Pippin rex…Bertha regina" and "Karolus imperator…Hiltikart regina, Fastrat regina, Liutkart regina", deducing that "Ruadtrud, Ruadheid" must also be linked logically to "Karolus maior domus" because of the order in which the names are listed. The primary source which specifically names the first wife of Charles "Martel" has not been identified.
m secondly (725) SUANACHILDIS [Suanhilde], niece of ODILO Duke of Bavaria, daughter of --- (-after 17 Sep 741). The precise parentage of Suanachildis is not known. The Continuator of Fredegar records that "matrona quondam…Beletrude et nepta sua Sunnichilde" were captured and taken to Austrasia by Charles "Martel" in [724/25]. Einhard names "Swannhilde neptem Odilonis ducis Baioariorum" as the mother of Grifo. The precise relationship between Suanhilde and Pilitrude, who was the wifife in turn of the brothers Grimoald and Theodoald, has not been identified. She instigated the marriage of her stepdaughter to Odilo Duke of Bavaria according to the Continuator of Fredegar[162]. After the death of her husband, she incited heer son to rebel against her stepsons. She was defeated and sent to the monastery of Chelles, Seine-et-Marne. "Karlus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "villa Clippiacum in pago Parisiaco" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 17 Sep 741, subscribed by "Radberti comitis, Raygaubaldi comitis, Salaconis comitis, matrone Sonechildis, Grifonis filii sui".
Mistress (1): CHROTHAIS, daughter of ---. Settipani quotes a name list in the Liber confraternitatum augiensis, quoted above under Chrothrudis first wife of Charles "Martel", concluding that "Ruadtrud, Ruadheid" must be linked logically to "Karolus maior domus" because of the order in which the names are listed.
Mistress (2): ---. The name of the second mistress of Charles "Martel" is not known.
Charles "Martel" & his first wife had three children:
1. CARLOMAN ([705/10]-4 Dec 754, bur Vienne, Isère). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinumum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". "Karlomanni filii eius" subscribed the charter dated 1 Jan 722 under which "Karolus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "castrum…Fethna sitam in pagpago Nifterlaco" to the monastery "infra muros Traiecto castro". He succeeded his father as maior domus, jointly with his brother Pepin. They deprived their half-brother Grifo of his inheritance, and defeated him after he rebelled against them. In the division of territories agreed with his brother, Carloman governed Austrasia, Alemannia, Thuringia and northern Alsace. The brothers were faced with revolts in Frisia, Bavaria, Alemannia and Aquitaine. As a symbolic assertion of their authority, they nominated Childeric III as [Merovingian] king in 743. Einhard records that "Karlomannus" was in Saxony at "castrum Hohseoburg" and there accepted the surrender of "Theodericum Saxonem illius loci primarium" in 743. "Childerichus rex Francorum" with "Karolomanno maiores domus, rectori palatio nostro" confirmed donations to the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy by charter dated Jul 744. In 745, Carloman's brother Pepin appropriated the province of Alemannia for himself. Carloman reasserted his authority with an expedition against the Alemans in 746, massacring the leaders who had betrayed him to his brother. This triggered the defection of his other supporters, and Carloman relinquished power. The Chronicocon Sancti Medardi Suessionensis records that “Carlomannus frater Pippini junioris” became a monk in 745 and that “Pippinus junior parvus frater eius” obtained the whole of “Principatum Francorum”. The Royal Frankish Annals record that, after 115 Aug 747, he left for Rome, where he built the monastery of St Sylvester on Monte Soracte before moving to the monastery of St Benedict at Monte Cassino where he became a monk. He returned to France in 753 to oppose the request by Pope Stephen III (II) for Frankish help against the Lombards. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 754 of "Karlamannus". m ---. The name of Carloman's wife is not known. Carloman & his wife had [three or more] children:
a) DROGO ([730/35]-after 753). "Karlemannus maiorum domus filius quondam Karoli" made a donation of property including "villa…Levione…in pago Condustrinse…" to "monasterio Stabulaus seu Malmundario" dated 8 Jun [746], subscribed by "Drogone filio eius"[174]. He succeeded his father in 747 as maior domus. His uncle Pepin set him aside in 753 and sent him to a monastery where he died soon after.
b) [other children. Settipani refers to texts which refer to "the children of Carloman" without naming them, but he does not cite these sources.]
2. PEPIN [III] (715-Saint-Denis 24 Sep 768, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". He succeeded his father as maior domus jointly with his brother Carloman. He succeeded in 751 as PEPIN “le Bref” King of the Franks.
3. CHILTRUDIS [Hiltrude] (-754, bur Hostenhoven, Kloster Gengenbach). The Continuator of Fredegar names "Chiltrudis" as daughter of Charles "Martel", stating that her "wicked stepmother" incited her to joined Odilo of Bavaria whom she married without the permission of her brothers. After the death of her husband, she was regent in Bavaria for her son Duke Tassilo III. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 754 of "Hildtrud". m (741) ODILO Duke of Bavaria [Agilolfinger], son of --- (-18 Jan 748, bur Hostenhoven, Kloster Gengenbach). His brother-in-law Carloman invaded Bavaria, and Odilo was forced to recognise Frankish suzerainty in 744.
Charles "Martel" & his [first/second wife/mistress] had two possible children:
4. [LANDRADA . Settipani quotes an Aquitaine necrology which lists "Willelmus…pater eius Theodericus, mater Aldana soror Hiltrudis et Landradæ". He suggests that "Hiltrudis" was the wife of Odilo Duke of Bavaria, and therefore that all three ssisters were daughters of Charles "Martel". The theory is attractive but not conclusive, as its validity depends on there being no other contemporary Hiltrudis, which is not provable. If it is correct, there is no indication about the mother of Landrada and Aldana. Hlawitschka highlights the case against the affiliation.]
5. [ALDANA . Settipani quotes an Aquitaine necrology which lists "Willelmus…pater eius Theodericus, mater Aldana soror Hiltrudis et Landradæ". He suggests that "Hiltrudis" was the wife of Odilo Duke of Bavaria, and therefore that all three sisters were daughters of Charles "Martel". The theory is attractive but not conclusive, as its validity depends on there being no other contemporary Hiltrudis, which is not provable. If it is correct, there is no indication about the mother of Landrada and Aldana. Hlawitschka highlights the case against the affiliation. "Willelmus…comes" names "genitore meo Theuderico et genitrice mea Aldana" in his charter dated 14 Dec 804 (version two: dated 15 Dec 804) for the foundation of the monastery of Gellone m THEODERIC Comte d'Autun, son of --- (-before 804).]
Charles "Martel" & his second wife had one child:
6. GRIFO ([726]-killed in battle Saint Jean de Maurienne 753). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death, specifying that "Grifo…minor natu…matrem habuit Swannhilde neptem Odilonis ducis Baioariorum". The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". "Karlus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "villa Clippiacum in pago Parisiaco" to the abbey of Saint-Denis by charter dated 17 Sep 741, subscribed by "Radberti comitis, Raygaubaldi comitis, Salaconis comitis, matrone Sonechildis, Grifonis filii sui". His father bequeathed to Grifo the central part of his territory, but his stepbrothers Carloman and Pepin deprived him of this inheritance and split the land between themselves. Grifo rebelled, incited by his mother, but was defeated at Laon and imprisoned by Carloman at Neufchâteau in the Ardennes. He was released in 747 by his brother Pepin and fled to Saxony, where he raised an army although armed conflict was avoided. He invaded Bavaria where he was recognised as Duke in 748 in succession to Duke Odilo, but was deposed by Pepin who installed their nephew Tassilo III as duke. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 748 Pepin granted Grifo the duchy of Mans and twelve counties in Neustria, although the source does not identify these counties more precisely. The Continuator of Fredegar records that in 748 "germanus ipsius rege…Gripho" fled once more and allied himself with Waifar Duke of the Aquitanians. Grifo rebelled yet again, in alliance with the Bretons. He fled to Lombardy to join Aistulf King of the Lombards but was caught and killed while he was passing the Alps by "Theudoeno comite Viennense…et Frederico Ultraiurano comite", two of Pepin's supporters. His escape to Italy, capture and death at the hands of "Theodoino comite in valle Maurienna" is also recorded in the Annales Laurissenses. m ---. The name of Grifo's wife is not known. Grifo & his wife had [two possible] children:
a) [GRIFO . Settipani refers to a commemorative name list from Remiremont in which the names "Griffo, Carolus" follow immediately after another "Griffo", which may indicate that the former were sons of the latter, although even if this is correct there is no proof that the latter Grifo was the same person as the son of Charles "Martel".]
b) [CHARLES . Settipani refers to a commemorative name list from Remiremont in which the names "Griffo, Carolus" follow immediately after another "Griffo", which may indicate that the former were sons of the latter, although even if this is correct there is no proof that the latter Grifo was the same person as the son of Charles "Martel".]
Charles "Martel" had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):
7. BERNARD (before 732-787). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". Comte.
Charles "Martel" had two illegitimate sons by Mistress (2):
8. HIERONYMUS (-after [782]). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Remigium et Geronimum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex concubina". Comte. Abbé de Saint-Quentin.
9. REMIGIUS (-787). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Remigium et Geronimum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex concubina". Bishop of Rouen 755-771. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 787 of "Remigius et Bernehardus".”



“Became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia when his father, Pepin II, died in 714. That year he was imprisoned by his step-mother Plectudis, but escaped later in the year to lead the Austrasian and Neustrian nobles. The next year, the new King Chilperic II refused to act as a puppet to the nobles, and was backed by the Aquitaine duke Eudo, who was by then semi-independent from Frankish sovergnty. In 719, Charles defeated Eudo and took Chilperic hostage. Eudo's terms for mercy were that CChilperic would be recognized as sole ruler of the Franks, and that Charles would control all royal offices (i.e. as Mayor). Eudo had no other choice but to accept. In 720, Chilperic II died, Theuderic IV became king, Charles was stripped of his positions, Eudo was able to attain full independence, and Charles was preoccupied with pushing back Saxon invaders across the Rhine.
 
In 732 Charles Martel and his barbarian Frankish army fought a battle near Tours, France, that affected the history of Europe. Their foes were inspired Muslim, or Saracen, troops who were bent on world conquest for the religion of Islam. In a huhundred years the Saracens had established a vast empire that stretched from Persia (now Iran) westward across northern Africa. They had gained a foothold in Europe by taking Spain. As they advanced into the region that is now France, the fate of Christian Europe hung in the balance. Charles met the Muslim forces between Poitiers and Tours. In a fierce and bloody battle the Muslims were defeated and their leader killed. In later campaigns Charles drove them back into Spain. His vigorous blows earned him the nickname Martel, from a French word meaning "hammer." This forceful leader never became king of the Franks. As mayor of the palace under ineffectual Merovingian kings, however, he was the true ruler. He increased the influluence of the Frankish kingdom in wars against the Alemanni, Bavarians, and Saxons. These and other Germanic tribes had overrun Europe when the Roman Empire crumbled. Only the Franks established a permanent kingdom. Charles aided St. Boniface and other missionaries in spreading Christianity and civilization among the barbarians. He strengthened the hold of the kingdom over the powerful nobles and bishops who sought to set up independent rule in their districts. He distributed land to his nobles to gain their loyalty and service as warriors. Charles prepared the way for his son, Pepin the Short, to gain the Frankish throne. Together they laid the foundation for the reign of Pepin's son Charlemagne.”

From the Catholic Encyclopedia, copyright © 1913 by the Encyclopedia Press, Inc.
Electronic version copyright © 1996 by New Advent, Inc.”: “Born about 688; died at Quierzy on the Oise, 21 October, 741. He was the natural son of Pepin of Herstal and a woman named Alpaïde or Chalpaïde. Pepin, who in 714, had outlived his two legitimate sons, Drogon and Grimoald, and to Theodoald, a son of the latter and then only six years old, fell the burdensome inheritance of the French monarchy. Charles, who was then twenty-six, was not excluded from the succession on account of his birth, Theodoald himself being the son of a concubine, but through the influence of Plectrude, Theodoald's grandmother, who wished the power invested in her own descendants exclusively.
To prevent any opposition from Charles she had him cast into prison and, having established herself at Cologne, assumed the guardianship of her grandson. But the different nations whom the strong hand of Pepin of Herstal had held in subjections, shook off the yoke of oppression as soon as they saw that it was with a woman they had to deal. Neustria gave the signal for revolt (715), Theodoald was beaten in the forest of Cuise and, led by Raginfrid, mayor of tthe palace, the enemy advanced as far as the Meuse. The Frisians flew to arms and, headed by their duke, Ratbod, destroyed the Christian mission and entered into a confederacy with the Neustrians. The Saxons came and devastated the country of ththe Hattuarians, and even in Austrasia there was a certain faction that chafed under the government of a woman and child. At this juncture Charles escaped from prison and put himself at the head of the national party of Austrasia. At first he was unfortunate. He was defeated by Ratbod near Cologne in 716, and the Neustrians forced Plectrude to acknowledge as king Chilperic, the son of Childeric II, having taken this Merovingian from the seclusion of the cloister, where he lived the namame of Daniel. But Charles was quick to take revenge. He surprised and conquered the Neustrians at Amblève near Malmédy (716), defeated them a second time at Vincy near Cambrai (21 March, 717), and pursued them as far as Paris. Then retracing his steps, he came to Cologne and compelled Plectrude to surrender her power and turn over to him the wealth of his father, Pepin. In order to give his recently acquired authority a semblance of
legitimacy, he proclaimed the Merovingian Clotaire IV King of Austrasia, reserving for himself the title of Mayor of the Palace. It was about this time that Charles banished Rigobert, the Bishop of Reims, who had opposed him, appointing in his stead the warlike and unpriestly Milon, who was already Archbishop of Trier.
The ensuing years were full of strife. Eager to chastise the Saxons who had invaded Austrasia, Charles in the year 718 laid waste their country to the banks of the Weser. In 719 Ratbod died, and Charles seized Western Friesland without any great resistance on the part of the Frisians, who had taken possession of it on the death of Pepin. The Neustrians, always a menace, had joined forces with the people of Aquitaine, but Charles hacked their army to pieces at Soissons. After this defeat they realized the necessity of surrendering, and the death of King Clotaire IV, whom Charles had placed on the throne but two years previously, facilitated reconciliation of the two great fractions of the Frankish Empire. Charles acknowledged Chilperic as head of the entire monarchy, while on their side, the Neustrians and Aquitainians endorsed the authority of Charles; but, when Chilperic died, the following year (720) Charles appointed as his successor the son of Dagobert III, Thierry IV, who was still a minor, and who occupied the throne from 720 to 737. A second expedition against the Saxons in 720 and the definitive submission of Raginfrid, who had been left the county of Angers (724), re-established the Frankish Monarchy as it had been under Pepin of Herstal, and closed the first series of Charles Martel's struggles. The next
six years were devoted almost exclusively to the confirming of the Frankish authority over the dependent Germamanic tribes. In 725 and 728 Charles went into
Bavaria, where the Agilolfing dukes had gradually rendered themselves
independent, and re-established Frankish suzerainty. He also brought thence the
Princess Suanehilde, who seems to have become hihis mistress. In 730 he marched
against Lantfrid, Duke of the Alemanna, whom he likewise brought into
subjection, and thus Southern Germany once more became part of the Frankish
Empire, as had Northern Germany during the first years of the reign. But at the
extremity of the empire a dreadful storm was gathering. For several years the
Moslems of Spain had been threatening Gaul. Banished thence in 721 by Duke
Eudes, they had returned in 725 and penetrated as far as Burgundy, where they
had destroyed Autun. Duke Eudes, unable to resist them, at length contented
himself by negotiating with them, and to Othmar, one of their chiefs, he gave
the hand of his daughter But this compromising alliance brought him into
disfavour with Charles, who defeated him in 731, and the death of Othmar that
same year again left Eudes at the mercy of Moslem enterprise. In 732
Abd-er-Rahman, Governor of Spain, crossed the Pyrenees at the head of an immense
army, overcame Duke Eudes, and advanced as far as the Loire, pillaging and
burning as he went. In October, 732, Charles met Abd-er-Rahman outside of Tours
and defeated and slew him in a battle (the Battle of Poitiers) which must ever
remain one of the great events in the history oof the world, as upon its issue
depended whether Christian Civilization should continue or Islam prevail
throughout Europe. It was this battle, it is said, that gave Charles his name,
Martel (Tudites) "The Hammer", because of the merciless way iin which he smote
the enemy.
The remainder of Charles Martel's reign was an uninterrupted series of
triumphant combats. In 733-734 he suppressed the rebellion instigated by the
Frisian duke, Bobo, who was slain in battle, and definitively subdued Friesland,
which finally adopted Christianity. In 735, after the death of Eudes, Charles
entered Aquitaine, quelled the revolt of Hatto and Hunold, sons of the deceased
duke, and left the duchy to Hunold, to be held in fief (736). He then banished
the Moslems from Arles and Avignon, defeated their army on the River Berre near
Narbonne, and in 739 checked an uprising in Provence, the rebels being under the
leadership of Maurontus. So great was Charles' power during the last years of
hhis reign that he did not take the trouble to appoint a successor to King
Thierry IV, who died in 737, but assumed full authority himself, governing
without legal right. About a year before Charles died, Pope Gregory III,
threatened by Luitprand, King of Lombardy, asked his help. Now Charles was
Luitprand's ally because the latter had promised to assist him in the late war
against the Moslems of Provence, and, moreover, the Frankish king may have
already suffered from the malady that was to carry him off—two reasons that are
surely sufficient to account for the fact that the pope's envoys departed
without gaining the object of their errand. However, it would seem that,
according to the terms of a public act published by Charlrlemagne, Charles had, at
least in principle, agreed to defend the Roman Church, and death alone must have
prevented him from fulfilling this agreement. The reign, which in the beginning
was so full of bloody conflicts and later of such incessant strife, would have
been an impossibility had not Charles procured means sufficient to attract and
compensate his partisans. For this purpose he conceived the idea of giving them
the usufruct of a great many ecclesiastical lands, and this spoliation is what
is referred to as the secularization by Charles Martel. It was an expedient that
could be excused without, however, being justified, and it was pardoned to a
certain extent by the amnesty granted at the Council of Lestines, held under the
sons of Charles Martel in 743. It must also be remembered that the Church
remained the legal owner of the lands thus alienated. This spoliation and the
conferring of the principal ecclesiastical dignities upon those who were either
totally unworthy or else had naught but their military qualifications to
recommend them—as, for instance, the assignment of the episcopal Sees of Reims
of Reims and Trier to Milon—were not calculated to endear Charles Martel to the
clergy of his timeme. Therefore, in the ninth century Hincmar of Reims related the
story of the vision with which St. Eucher was said to have been favoured and which showed Charles in hell, to which he had been condemned for robbing the Church of its property.
But notwithstanding the almost exclusively warlike character of his reign,
Charles Martel was not indifferent to the superior interests of civilization and
Christianity. Like Napoleon after the French Revolution, upon emerging from the
years 715-719, Charles, who had not only tolerated but perpetrated many an act
of violence against the Church, set about the establishment of social order and
endeavoured to restore the rights of the Catholic hierarchy. This explains the
protection which iin 723 he accorded St. Boniface (Winfrid), the great apostle of
Germany, a protection all the more salutary as the saint himself explained to
his old friend, Daniel of Winchester, that without it he could neither
administer his church, defend his clergy, nor prevent idolatry. Hence Charles
Martel shares, to a certain degree, the glory and merit of Boniface's great work
of civilization. He died after having divided the Frankish Empire, as a
patrimony between his two sons, Carloman and Pepin.
GODEFROID KURTH
Transcribed by Michael C. Tinkler”

«s61», «s87» 
Charles “Martel” Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia (I10663)
 
264 “Charles E. Peterson was born about 1822 in Maine. He died on 11 Jan 1868 in Washington, Beaufort County, North Carolina. In the 1860 Census he is in Chocowinity, Beaufort County, North Carolina.
Record North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster Vol VI Infantry by the North Carolina State Division of Archives and History, 1977, Page 187, lists, "Charles E. Peterson, born Franklin County, Maine and was by occupation a machinist prior to enlisting in Beaufort Co. at age 38."
In the Franklin Journal (local newspaper in Maine), "Charles E. Peterson of Freeman b. about 1822 d. Jan 11 1868 @ 46y in Washington NC of Typhoid."
In a March 1868 petition, Jacob Swindell, as administrator of Charles E. Peterson's estate, petitioned the Beaufort County, North Carolina Superior Court to sell lands for the care of Charles E. and Martha (Swindell) Peterson's 3 children - Edwin, Benjamin F. and Lucy Peterson, In the petition it states that the 'widows dower does not apply' as Martha is deceased.
In 1870 there is an Edwin 17, Benjamin 11, and Lucy Peterson all born in North Carolina living with Jacob Swindle in Long Acre, Beaufort, North Carolina, Dwelling and Family 155.

Charles E. PETERSON and Martha A. SWINDLE were married on 16 Nov 1851.25 Report of Marriages 1851-1868 Beaufort County, North Carolina by the Beaufort County Genealogy Society - "Peterson, Chs. E. and Martha A. Swindle married 16 Nov 1851." Martha A. SWINDLE25 was born about 1834 in North Carolina. She died before Mar 1868. As noted in a March 1868 estate administrator petition it appears Martha died before March 1868 and since Charles E. is recorded dying from typhoid it is quite possible also did.

From website: www.mpeterson.us/genpeterson/narrative/plym.htm, Mike Peterson, Contact Person, copied 1 October 2013:
“Charles E. PETERSON was born on 29 January 1822 in Kingfield, Franklin County, Maine. He died on 11 January 1868 at the age of 45 in Washington, Beaufort County, North Carolina. In the 1860 Census he is in Chocowinity, Beaufort County, North Carolina.
“Record North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster Vol VI Infantry by the North Carolina State Division of Archives and History, 1977, Page 187, lists, "Charles E. Peterson, born Franklin County, Maine and was by occupation a machinist prior to enlisting in Beaufort Co. at age 38."
“In the Franklin Journal (local newspaper in Maine), "Charles E. Peterson of Freeman b. about 1822 d. Jan 11 1868 @ 46y in Washington NC of Typhoid."
“In a March 1868 petition, Jacob Swindell, as administrator of Charles E. Peterson's estate, petitioned the Beaufort County, North Carolina Superior Court to sell lands for the care of Charles E. and Martha (Swindell) Peterson's 3 children - Edwin, Benjamin F. and Lucy Peterson, In the petition it states that the 'widows dower does not apply' as Martha is deceased.
“In 1870 there is an Edwin 17, Benjamin 11, and Lucy Peterson all born in North Carolina living with Jacob Swindle in Long Acre, Beaufort, North Carolina, Dwelling and Family 155.
“Charles E. PETERSON and Martha A. SWINDLE were married on 16 November 1851. Report of Marriages 1851-1868 Beaufort County, North Carolina by the Beaufort County Genealogy Society - "Peterson, Chs. E. and Martha A. Swindle married 16 Nov 1851." Martha A. SWINDLE was born on 2 June 1833 in North Carolina. She died before March 1868 at the age of 34. As noted in a March 1868 estate administrator petition it appears Martha died before March 1868 and since Charles E. is recorded dying from typhoid it is quite possible also did.
“Charles E. PETERSON and Martha A. SWINDLE had the following children:
Edwin PETERSON was born about 1853.
Benjamin F. PETERSON.
Lucy PETERSON was born about 1862 in North Carolina. 
PETERSON, Charles E. (I3648)
 
265 “Charles Kent Peterson was born on 28 May 1792. The "Maine Families in 1790" states, "Charles, b. 28 May 1792 married Hannah (reference Oxford Co deeds, 15:409). He purchased his father's homestead farm in Jay on 27 Oct 1815 in return for life se support. (Oxf Co deeds, 15:204). Hannah received a pension for Charles's service in the War of 1812 in Captain Peter Chadwick's Co (Virgil White, Index to War of 1812 Pension Files (1989), p. 1415)." Maine Families also adds to previous sources a ninth child, Ruth.
In the 1850 Census, he is in Freeman, Franklin County, Maine, Dwelling 206, Family 214.
In the 1860 Census, he is in Freeman, Franklin County, Maine, Page 37, Dwelling 258 with Hannah, Benjamin F., Vesta, and Morgina.

Charles Kent PETERSON and Hannah TRASK were married. Hannah TRASK was born about 1801 in Maine.”

From website: www.mpeterson.us/genpeterson/narrative/plym.htm, Mike Peterson, Contact Person, copied 1 October 2013:
“Charles Kent PETERSON was born on 28 May 1793 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine. He was buried in October 1882 in Butterfield Cemetery, Farmington, Franklin County, Maine. The records of the Butterfield Cemetery have this recording,
"5-28-1793 - 10-21-1882 (Flag)
A soldier of the War of 1812
Hannah his wife 11-25-1797 - 8-29-1891" He died on 21 October 1882 at the age of 89 in Farmington, Franklin County, Maine.
“The "Maine Families in 1790" states, "Charles, b. 28 May 1792: m. Hannah ______ (Oxf Co deeds, 15:409). He purchased his father's homestead farm in Jay on 27 Oct 1815 in return for life support. (Oxf Co deeds, 15:204). Hannah received a pension for Charles's service as a private in the War of 1812 in Capt. Peter Chadwick's Co., 34th U.S. Infantry (Virgil White, Index to War of 1812 Pension Files (1989), p. 1415)."
“In a Declaration of Soldier for Pension document it states Charles served in the war of 1812, in Captain Peter Chadwick's Company, 34th Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division from 4 May 1813 until 5 May 1815 and was honorably discharged at Plattsburg and he performed service at Chataquay Farm corners, Cataquay woods and at ....... .
“The following is digested from researcher Charles Hall: "Here is what I found in Kingfield, on Oct 24 this year [Editor: 2011]. (It is fortunate that when I was there in 2007 the then town clerk showed me a book). The present town clerk brought out a bigger, more comprehensive record, with a handwritten index. When I insisted "this is not the book I saw in 2007," she brought out the other book [Editor: It is presumed this is some sort of vital records recording]. On page 41- both open pages left and right have the same handwritten number - births are recorded on the left, deaths on the right - at the top of the page, 'Births'. Under that, 'The children of Charles Kent Peterson and his wife Hannah born as follows viz John Baker Peterson at Kingfield August 17, 1815, Nancy --------- at Jay July 10, 1817, Sally --------- at Kingfield Nov 9th, 1819, Charles -- ---- at Kingfield January 29, 1822.' In the margin on the left between Sally and Charles is written, 'Entered March 1st, 1822'.
“In the 1850 Census, he is in Freeman, Franklin County, Maine, Dwelling 206, Family 214 with Charles as a farmer, value of real estate at $250.
“In the 1860 Census, he and Hannah are living with their son Benjamin in Freeman, Franklin County, Maine, Page 37, Dwelling 258.
“In the 1870 Census, he and Hannah are living with their son Benjamin in New Portland, Somerset County, Maine, Page 33, Dwelling 263, Family 291.
“The Declaration of Soldier for Pension document indicated he was living in New Portland, Somerset County, Maine in May 1871.
“In the 1880 Census, he and Hannah are living in District 1, Farmington, Franklin County, Maine, Page 7, Dwelling 75, Family 76. Their daughter Welthy is living with them.
“In his wife's Application for Accrued Pension of 11 January 1883 it indicates Charles died on 26 October 1882.
“Charles Kent PETERSON and Hannah TRASK were married on 2 March 1815 in Kingfield, Franklin County, Maine. Hannah TRASK was born on 25 November 1797 in Maine. She died on 29 August 1891 at the age of 93 in Farmington, Franklin County, Maine. She was buried on 8 September 1891 in Butterfield Cemetery, Farmington, Franklin County, Maine. The records of the Butterfield Cemetery for Charles K. Peterson have this recording,
"5-28-1793 - 10-21-1882 (Flag)
A soldier of the War of 1812
Hannah his wife 11-25-1797 - 8-29-1891"
“In the Application for Accrued Pension, Hannah is living in Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Post Office address is Waltham) on 11 January 1883.
“Charles Kent PETERSON and Hannah TRASK had the following children:
John Baker PETERSON was born on 17 August 1815 in Kingfield, Franklin County, Maine.
Nancy PETERSON was born on 10 July 1817 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine.
Sally PETERSON was born on 9 November 1819 in Kingfield, Franklin County, Maine.
Charles E. PETERSON.
Wealthy O. PETERSON.
William H. PETERSON was born about 1829.
Clarinda PETERSON was born about 1831.
Benjamin F. PETERSON.
Verda (Vesta) B. PETERSON was born about 1839 in Maine.
Morgiana (Georgianna) Allen PETERSON.”

1820 Census: Me: Somerset: Kingfield
Charles Patterson
1 male under 10
1 male 16-26
2 females under 10
1 female 10-under 16
1 female 26-45

1830 Census: ME: Somerset: New Portland:
Charles Peterson:
1 male under 5
1 male 5- under 10
1 male 10- under 15
1 male 30- under 40
1 female 5- under 10
2 females 10- under 15
1 female 30- under 40

1840 Census: ME: Franklin: Freeman:
Charles Peterson:
1 male under 5
1 male 5-10
1 male 10-15
1 male 15-20
1 male 40-50
1 female 5-10
1 female 10-15
1 female 20-30
1 female 40-50

1850 Census: ME: Franklin, Freeman:
Charles Peterson, 58, farmer, $250, born in ME;
Hannah Peterson, 49, born in ME;
William H. Peterson, 21, carpenter, born in ME;
Clarinda Peterson, 19, born in ME;
Benjamin F. Peterson, 14, born in ME;
Vesta B. Peterson, 11, born in ME;
Morgiana A. Peterson, 9, born in ME.

1860 Census: ME: Franklin: Freeman:
Charles Peterson, 67, farmer, $300, $500, born in ME;
Hannah Peterson, 60, born in ME;
Benjamin F. Peterson, 23, painter, born in ME;
Vesta B. Peterson, 19, born in ME;
Morgina A. Peterson, 17, born in ME.

At the time of the 1870 census, Charles and Hannah are living with their son, Benjamin F. Peterson, in New Portland, Somerset, Maine.

On Sept. 19, 1871, Charles Peterson and wife Hannah Peterson, of New Portland, sell land in Freeman to Benjamin G. Davis of Lewiston. Land sale is signed in the presence of J. B. Peterson.

1880 Census: ME: Franklin: Farmington:
Peterson, Charles, 87, retired farmer; born in ME, father and mother born in MA;
Hannah, 81, born in ME, father and mother born in ME;
Fillebrown, Wealthy, 55, daughter, widowed, tailoress, born in ME, father and mother born in ME.

Buried in the Butterfield Cemetery, Farmington, Maine:
Charles K. Peterson, 05-28-1793 - 10-21-1882 (flag)
A Soldier of the War of 1812
Hannah his wife 11-25-1797 - 08-29-1891
and
Martha J. Peterson 12-18-1838 - 4-11-1917

Maine Families in 1790 (based on 1790 census) lists Charles and Hannah Peterson. He purchased his father’s homestead farm in Jay on 27 Oct 1815 in return for life support. Hannah received a pension for Charles’service as a private in the War of 1812 in Capt. Peter Chadwick’s Co., 34th U.S. Infantry.

Charles K. Peterson’s middle name is “Kent.”

“Charles K. Peterson, b. May 28, 1793; md. , Mar. 2, 1815, Hannah Trask of Kingfield. She was b. Nov. 25, 1797. Charles served during the war of 1812. They lived in Freeman in the 1850’s and 1860’s where he was engaged in farming. Charles d. Oct. 21, 1882 and Hannah d. Aug. 29, 1891. They are bur. in Butterfield Ce., West Farmington. Ten children, six of record: 1) Sarah W. “Polly” b. Nov. 9, 1819 in Kingfield; 2) William H., b. 1829. He was living at home in 1850. 3) Clarinda, b. 1831. She was living at home in 1850. 4) Benjamin F., b. 1836.; 5) Vesta Bray, b. Aug. 29, 1838 in Freeman; 6) Morgiana Allen, b. Dec. 8, 1840 in Freeman., 
PETERSON, Charles Kent (I3439)
 
266 “CHARLES, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his second wife Judith [Welf] (Frankfurt-am-Main 13 Jun 823-Avrieux or Brides-les-Bains, Savoie 6 Oct 877, bur Nantua Abbey, transferred to église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth of "Karolus filius Ludowici" in Frankfurt "Idus Iun 824". Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names Charles as son of his father by his second wife. His father invested Charles as dux in Alemania, Rhetia, Alsace and part of Burgundy at Worms Aug 829, reducing the territory of his oldest brother Lothaire to Italy. This triggered the revolt of his older half-brothers in Mar 830, when they captured their father at Compiègne and forced him to revert to the constitutional arrangements decided in 817. His father installed Charles as King of Aquitaine in Sep 832, having deprived Charles's half-brother Pepin. His father restored Aquitaine to Pepin 15 Mar 834 at Quierzy-sur-Oise. His father accorded Charles the land between Frisia and the Seine at the Assembly of Aix-la-Chapelle in 837, Maine and the land between the Seine and the Loire (as well as a royal crown) in 838, and Francia between the Meuse and the Seine, western and southern Burgundy, Provence, Neustria, the march of Bretagne, Aquitaine, Gascogne and Septimanie at the Assembly of Worms 28 May 839. On the death of his father, he became King of the Franks of the West. His brother Emperor Lothaire sought to deprive him of his lands. Charles allied himself with his half-brother Ludwig and together they defeated Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye 25 Jun 841. Under the division of imperial territories agreed under the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, he bececame CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks. King of Aquitaine in 848, when he deposed his nephew Pepin II. In 865, Charles agreed with Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks the future division of the territories of Lothairre II King of Lotharingia, but on the latter's death in 869 Charles invaded Lotharingia and proclaimed himself CHARLES King of Lotharingia before Ludwig could assert his rights. A settlement was reached at Meerssen in Aug 870 under which Charles received the Meuse valley, Lyonnais, Viennois and Vivarais, declaring himself king of Lotharingia in 869. He was crowned Emperor CHARLES II at Rome 25 Dec 875 by Pope John VIII, and elected king of Italy at Pavia in 876. The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death of "Karolus imperator Prid Non Oct 877". The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "III Non Oct" of "Karolus Calvus rex Francorum".
m firstly (Quierzy, Aisne 13 Dec 842, separated 867) ERMENTRUDIS, daughter of EUDES Comte [d’Orléans] & his wife Engeltrudis (27 Sep [830]-Saint-Denis 6 Oct 869, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Annales Bertiniani record the mmarriage in 842 of "Ermendrud neptem Adalardi comitis" and "Karolus" at "Carisiacum palatium". Nithard names "Hirmentrude, daughter of Odo and Ingiltrud" as wife of Charles. She was crowned in Aug 866 at Saint-Médard de Soissons. After she waas separated from her husband, she retired to a monastery. The Annales Bertiniani record the death "869 II Non Oct in monasterio Sancti Dyonisii" of "Hyrmentrudem uxorem suam [=Karoli]" and her burial at Saint-Denis. The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "Non Oct" of "Irmentrudis regina uxor Caroli". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Non Oct" of "Hirmentrudis regina".
m secondly (12 Oct 869, confirmed Aix-la-Chapelle 22 Jan 870) RICHILDIS, daughter of comte BUVIN & his wife --- d'Arles (-[30 Jan] [910 or after]). The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage "869 VII Id Oct" of "sororem…Bosonis…Richildem" and King Charles II. She was crowned empress at Tortona in Lombardy by Pope John VIII in 877. “Richildis quondam regina” donated property, among which “in pago Gerbercinse in Langeii villa”, to Gorze Abbey by charter dated 910. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "III Kal Feb" of "RICHILDIS".
Emperor Charles II & his first wife had nine children:
1. JUDITH ([844]-after 870). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that she married "Balduinus comes". Thhe Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head. Her first husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice in the kingdom of Wessex. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband. Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself". The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi AnglAnglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium". m firstly (Verberie-sur-Oise, near Senlis 1 Oct 856) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, son of ECGBERT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/800]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester). m secondly (858) ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne). m thirdly (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders, son of ODACRE [Audacer/Odoscer] Graf van Harlebeek & his wife --- ([837/840]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer).
2. LOUIS (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 10 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina". He succeeded his father in 877 as LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks.
3.CHARLES ([847/48]-near Buzançais, Indre 29 Sep 866, bur Bourges, église de Saint-Sulpice). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi rregina". Elected King of Aquitaine in Oct 855 at Limoges, and crowned. His residence was at Bourges. He married against the wishes of his father, and was deprived of his titles in 863. He was restored as king of Aquitaine in 865. The Annaleles Bertiniani record the death "866 III Kal Oct in villa secus Bosentiacas" of "Karoli filius Karolus et Aquitanorum rex" two years after suffering severe brain injuries, and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Sulpitii apud Biturigum". The Chronicico Floriacensi records that "duo filii illius [Karolo Ludovici filio]…Hlotharius Abbas et Karolus Rex Aquitanorum" died in 866. m (862, annulled 863) as her second husband, ---, widow of HUMBERT Comte [de Bourges], daughter of ---. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage in 862 of "Karolus rex Aquitannorum, Karoli regis filius" and "relictam Humberti comitis", on the advice of "Stephani" against the will of his father.
4.CARLOMAN (-[877/78]). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina". "Carlomannum" is named son of King Charles by Folcuin, who sspecifies that his father installed him as abbot "Laubiensi". The Annales Bertiniani record that "Karlus rex Karlommanum filium suum" was tonsured in 854. Abbé de Saint-Médard at Soissons 860. He conspired against his father, was imprisoned at Senlis and deprived of his abbeys in 870. He escaped to Belgium. He was rejected by the church by judgment of the bishops meeting at Senlis in 873. His father had him blinded and imprisoned at the monastery of Corbie in 873. He fled to Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. He was sent to Luxembourg where he became Abbot of Echternach in 874.
5. LOTHAIRE (-14 Dec 865). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina". He was lame from birth. The Annales Bertiniani record thhat "Karlus rex filium Lotharium claudum" became a monk "in monasterio Sancti Iohannis" in 861[252]. He became a monk at the abbey of Moutier Saint-Jean in 861. Abbé de Saint-Germain at Auxerre. The Chronico Floriacensi records that "duo filii illius [Karolo Ludovici filio]…Hlotharius Abbas et Karolus Rex Aquitanorum" died in 866. One necrology of Saint-Germain d´Auxerre records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "domni Lotharii abbatis".
6. HILDEGARDIS. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina".
7. ERMENTRUDIS (-after 11 Jul 877). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina". The Historia Monasterii Hasnonensis names "Ermentrudis imperatrix et regina cum filia Ermendtrude". Abbess of Hasnon near Douai 11 Jul 877.
8. GISELA. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina".
9. [ROTRUDIS ([850]-). Settipani names Rotrudis as the daughter of King Charles II but appears to base this on her being named as such in the Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis[260], but this does not appear to be the case. Flodoard names "Rotrudi" when recording her election as abbess of "monasterii Sanctæ Crucis et Sanctæ Radegundis" but does not give her parentage. Abbess of Sainte-Radégonde at Poitiers 868-870.]
Emperor Charles II & his second wife had five children:
10. ROTHILDIS ([871]-22 Mar 929). Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks confirmed donations of property "in comitatu quoque Cœnomannico" made by "Hugo comes et mater sua Rothildis", at the request of "genitrix nostra Adeleidis et…comees Hugo consanguineus, necnon et…comes Ecfridus" by charter dated 1 Nov 900. The charter dated 929 subscribed by "Hugonis comitis filii Rotgerii comitis" suggests that Rothildis must have been the wife of Roger. Flodoard names "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived her of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Haganon, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti". As the paternal aunt of King Charles III, chronology determines that she must have been the daughter of her father's second marriage, although no source has so far been identified which states this to be the case. She acquired the monasteries of Chelles, and Notre-Dame aand Saint-Jean at Laon. She retreated to Chelles in 922 but was deprived of the monastery by her nephew Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks in favour of his favourite Haganon, an event which led to the rebellion of Robert Marquis een Neustrie who was the father of Rothilde's son-in-law (Hugues, later "le Grand" Duc des Francs). Her death is dated to late 928/early 929 as Flodoard names "Rothildis…nuper defunctæ" when recording that "Heribertus et Hugo comites" (specifying that "Hugo" was "gener ipsius Rothildis") attacked "Bosonem Rodulfi regis frater" in 929 over the property of Rothilde. This is also the only source so far identified from which her marriage is deduced. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Apr" of "Rothildis abbatisse et monache filia regis magni Karoli". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Rotildis abbatissa". These entries could refer alternativeely to Rothildis, daughter of Emperor Charlemagne, but it is more likely that the former entry would have referred to her father as "imperator" if that was the case. m ([890]) ROTGER [Roger] Comte, nephew of [HUGUES Comte de Bourges], son of --- (-before I Nov 900). Comte du Maine 897.
11. DROGO ([872/73]-[873/74], bur Abbaye de Saint-Amand, Flanders). The Chronico Floriacensi records the birth and death of "de Caroli Carolus…rex…Pippinus…simulque Drogo". Twin with Pepin.
12. PEPIN ([872/73]-[873/74], bur Abbaye de Saint-Amand, Flanders). The Chronico Floriacensi records the birth and death of "de Caroli Carolus…rex…Pippinus…simulque Drogo". Twin with Drogo.
13. son (23 Mar 875-soon after). The Annales Bertiniani record that in 875 "Richildis uxor eius [=Karoli]" gave birth to a child "noctu ante quartam feriam paschæ" which died immediately after being baptised.
14. CHARLES (10 Oct 876-877 before 7 Apr, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Annales Bertiniani record the death in early 877 of "filius eius [=Karoli]…Karolus" and his burial at Saint-Denis.”


From Wikipedia:
“ Charles the Bald (numbered Charles II of France and the Holy Roman Empire) (French: Charles le Chauve, German: Karl der Kahle; 13 June 823 – 6 October 877), Holy Roman Emperor (875–877) and King of West Francia (840–877), was the youngest son of Emperor Louis the Pious, by his second wife Judith.
He was born on 13 June 823 in Frankfurt, when his elder brothers were already adults and had been assigned their own regna, or subkingdoms, by their father. The attempts made by Louis the Pious to assign Charles a subkingdom, first Alemannia and then the country between the Meuse and the Pyrenees (in 832, after the rising of Pepin I of Aquitaine) were unsuccessful. The numerous reconciliations with the rebellious Lothair and Pepin, as well as their brother Louis the German, King of Bavaria, made Charles's share in Aquitaine and Italy only temporary, but his father did not give up and made Charles the heir of the entire land which was once Gaul and would eventually be France. At a diet near Crémieux in 837, Louis the Pious baade the nobles do homage to Charles as his heir. This led to the final rising of his sons against him and Pepin of Aquitaine died in 838, whereupon Charles received that kingdom, finally once and for all. Pepin's son Pepin II would be a perpetual thorn in his side.
The death of the emperor in 840 led to the outbreak of war between his sons. Charles allied himself with his brother Louis the German to resist the pretensions of the new emperor Lothair I, and the two allies defeated Lothair at the Battle of FoFontenay-en-Puisaye on June 25, 841. In the following year, the two brothers confirmed their alliance by the celebrated Oaths of Strasbourg. The war was brought to an end by the Treaty of Verdun in August 843. The settlement gave Charles the Bald the kingdom of the West Franks, which he had been up till then governing and which practically corresponded with what is now France, as far as the Meuse, the Saône, and the Rhône, with the addition of the Spanish March as far as the Ebro. Louiuis received the eastern part of the Carolingian Empire, known as the East Francia and later Germany. Lothair retained the imperial title and the Iron Crown of Lombardy. He also received the central regions from Flanders through the Rhineland and Burgundy as king of Middle Francia.
The first years of Charles's reign, up to the death of Lothair I in 855, were comparatively peaceful. During these years the three brothers continued the system of "confraternal government", meeting repeatedly with one another, at Koblenz (848)8), at Meerssen (851), and at Attigny (854). In 858, Louis the German, invited by disaffected nobles eager to oust Charles, invaded the West Frankish kingdom. Charles was so unpopular that he was unable to summon an army, and he fled to Burgundy. He was saved only by the support of the bishops, who refused to crown Louis king, and by the fidelity of the Welfs, who were related to his mother, Judith. In 860, he in his turn tried to seize the kingdom of his nephew, Charles of Provence, but was repulsed. On the death of his nephew Lothair II in 869, Charles tried to seize Lothair's dominions, but by the Treaty of Mersen (870) was compelled to share them with Louis the German.
Besides these family disputes, Charles had to struggle against repeated rebellions in Aquitaine and against the Bretons. Led by their chiefs Nomenoë and Erispoë, who defeated the king at Ballon (845) and Juvardeil (851), the Bretons were successsful in obtaining a de facto independence. Charles also fought against the Vikings, who devastated the country of the north, the valleys of the Seine and Loire, and even up to the borders of Aquitaine. Several times Charles was forced to purchasse their retreat at a heavy price. Charles led various expeditions against the invaders and, by the Edict of Pistres of 864, made the army more mobile by providing for a cavalry element, the predecessor of the French chivalry so famous during the next 600 years. By the same edict, he ordered fortified bridges to be put up at all rivers to block the Viking incursions. Two of these bridges at Paris saved the city during its siege of 885–886.
In 875, after the death of the Emperor Louis II (son of his half-brother Lothair), Charles the Bald, supported by Pope John VIII, traveled to Italy, receiving the royal crown at Pavia and the imperial insignia in Rome on December 29. Louis the German, also a candidate for the succession of Louis II, revenged himself by invading and devastating Charles' dominions, and Charles had to return hastily to Francia. After the death of Louis the German (28 August 876), Charles in his turn attemmpted to seize Louis's kingdom, but was decisively beaten at Andernach on October 8, 876. In the meantime, John VIII, menaced by the Saracens, was urging Charles to come to his defence in Italy. Charles again crossed the Alps, but this expedition was received with little enthusiasm by the nobles, and even by his regent in Lombardy, Boso, and they refused to join his army. At the same time Carloman, son of Louis the German, entered northern Italy. Charles, ill and in great distress, started on his way back to Gaul, but died while crossing the pass of Mont Cenis at Brides-les-Bain, on 6 October 877.
According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution.
Charles was succeeded by his son, Louis. Charles was a prince of education and letters, a friend of the church, and conscious of the support he could find in the episcopate against his unruly nobles, for he chose his councillors from among the higher clergy, as in the case of Guenelon of Sens, who betrayed him, and of Hincmar of Reims.
It has been suggested that Charles was not in fact bald, but that his epithet was applied ironically - that, in fact, he was extremely hairy. In support of this idea is the fact that none of his enemies commented on what would be an easy target. However, none of the voluble members of his court comments on his being hairy; and the Genealogy of Frankish Kings, a text from Fontanell dating from possibly as early as 869, and a text without a trace of irony, names him as Karolus Caluus ("Charles the Bald"). Certainly, by the end of the 10th century, Richier of Reims and Adhemar of Chabannes refer to him in all seriousness as "Charles the Bald".
Charles married Ermentrude, daughter of Odo I, Count of Orléans, in 842. She died in 869. In 870, Charles married Richilde of Provence, who was descended from a noble family of Lorraine, but none of the children he had with her played a part of any importance.
With Ermentrude:
-Judith (844–870), married firstly with Ethelwulf of Wessex, secondly with Ethelbald of Wessex (her stepson) and thirdly with Baldwin I of Flanders
-Louis the Stammerer (846–879)
-Charles the Child (847–866)
-Lothar (848–865), monk in 861, became Abbot of Saint-Germain
-Carloman (849–876)
-Rotrud (852–912), a nun, Abbess of Saint-Radegunde
-Ermentrud (854–877), a nun, Abbess of Hasnon
-Hildegard (born 856, died young)
-Gisela (857–874)
With Richilde:
-Rothild (871–929), married firstly with Hugues, Count of Bourges and secondly with Roger, Count of Maine
-Drogo (872–873)
-Pippin (873–874)
a son (born and died 875)
-Charles (876–877)”«s87» 
Charles Emperor, King of Lotharingia (I12668)
 
267 “CHARLES, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks & his second wife Adelais (posthumously 17 Sep 879-Péronne 7 Oct 929, bur Péronne, monastère de Saint-Fursy). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Karolum quoque postumuum et Irmintrudim" as children of "Hlodovicus rex…ex Adelheidi regina". His parentage is also given in the Annalista Saxo. Regino specifies that he was born posthumously. On the death of King Louis II, Emperor Charles III "le Gros" was elected King of the West Franks, and on the latter's death in 888, Eudes [Capet] was elected king. Louis II's son, Charles, sought refuge with Ramnulf II Comte de Poitou. Regino names "Folcone episcopo, Heriberto et Pippino comitibus in Remorum civitate" when recording that they supported the accession of Charles as king in 892 in opposition to King Eudes. Supported by Fulco Archbishop of Reims, he was crowned 28 Jan 893 at Reims as CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks, as anti-king to Eudes, who later agreed to appoint him as his successor and whom he succeeded from 1 Jan 898. The early years of his reign appear to have been dominated by Viking raids in the north which led to the treaty with Rollo in 911 and the grant of territory in the future duchy of Normandy. He was chosen as CHARLES King of Lotharingia 1 Nov 911, in succession to Ludwig IV "das Kind" King of the East Franks and Lotharingia, representing a significant extension of the royal domain. He used the title "King of the Franks/rex francorum", and later "King of France/rex franciæ". He captured Alsace early in 912, and fought the army of Konrad I King of Germany three times in Lotharingia. From [920], he fell under the influence of Haganon, a Lotharingian described in a charter of 921 as his cousin on his mother's side. This triggered the revolt of Robert Marquis en Neustrie [Capet] and other nobles during which King Charles was obliged to seek refuge with Heriveus Archchbishop of Reims. Although the king was restored after seven months, tension continued and Charles's award of the monastery of Chelles to Haganon in 922 triggered another revolt which led to the king's deposition 30 Jun 922 in favour of Robert, who was elected as Robert I King of France. Ex-king Charles fled to Lotharingia. He returned, but was be defeated at Soissons 15 Jun 923, although King Robert was killed in the battle. Raoul de Bourgogne was elected king of France 13 Jul 9223. Ex-king Charles was tricked into capture by Héribert II Comte de Vermandois and imprisoned at Château-Thierry. He was transferred in 924 to the château de Péronne, where he remained captive for the rest of his life. He was briefly declared king once more in 927 by Comte Heribert during the latter's unsuccessful attempt to capture Laon. According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Heinrich I King of Germany secured his release from prison and in return was rewarded with "the right hand of St Denis and the entire kingdom of the Lotharingians".
m firstly ([1/18] Apr 907) FREDERUNA, sister of BOVO [II] Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne, daughter of --- (-10 Feb 917, bur Reims, église abbatiale de Saint-Rémi). The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "907 XIII Kal Mai" refers to "quondam nobili proosapia puellam…Frederunam" who had recently become his wife. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "917 VII Kal Aug" refers to "nostra uxor Frideruna…frater eius Bovo Catalannensis Antistes Ecclesiæ". Nothing definite is known about the origins of Bovo, although Flodoard refers to "Berengario Transrhenensi clerico" as "nepoti Bovonis Catalaunensis quondam episcopi" when recording his appointment as Bishop of Cambrai in 956. McKitterick assumes that she was of Lotharingian origin. Settipani speculates that Queen Frederuna was probably a close relation of Mathilde, second wife of Heinrich I King of Germany. This could be explained if Mathilde's mother, Reginlind, was Queen Frederuna's sister, as hypothesised in GERMAN NOBILITY. The charter of "Karolus…rex" dated "918 IV Id Feb" refers to the death of "nostræ…coniugis Friderunæ", and the charter dated "918 II Id Mar" that she had died "IV Id Feb". The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "IV Id Feb" of "Frederuna regina".
m secondly ([917/19]) as her first husband, EADGIFU, daughter of EDWARD I "the Elder" King of England & his second wife Ælfleda ([902/05]-after 951, bur église Saint-Médard de Soissons). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Otgiva" wife of "K"Karolus rex" after the death of "Frederuna regina". She fled with her two-year-old son to England in 923 after her husband was deposed, returning to France in 936 after the death of King Raoul. Abbess of Notre-Dame de Laon, this was taken from her 951 by her son on her second marriage. Flodoard names "Ottogeba regina, mater Ludowici regis" when recording her second marriage. She married secondly (951) Héribert Comte "le Vieux" [de Vermandois] (-980/84).
Mistresses: ---. The names of King Charles III's mistresses are not known.
King Charles III & his first wife had six children:
1. ERMENTRUDE ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina". Hlawitschka suggests that Ermentrude, daughter of King Charles III, was the wife of Gottffied Graf im Jülichgau. This appears to be based on the combined reading of four strings of entries in the Liber Memorialis of Remiremont: (1) "Dumnus Gislibertus dux…Dumna Girberga, Ainricus, Haduidis…", which is followed by (2) "Gottefridus comes cum infantibus…suis, Ermentridis comitissa"; (3) "Gotefridus, Ermendrudis, Gotefridus, Gebardus, Gerardus, Adelardus, Girberga" assumed to be Gottfried, his wife, four sons and daughter, and ((4) "…Caroli imperatoris…Hludowici imperatoris, Hlotarii, Caroli, Ermentrudis", which may represent an abbreviated attempt to set out the ancestry of Ermentrude wife of Graf Gottfried. However, the connection between entries (1) to (3) and entry (4) appears to be speculation. [m (before [934]) GOTTFRIED Graf im Jülichgau, son of Graf GERHARD [Matfride] & his wife Oda [Ottonen] (-26 Mar after 949).]
2. FREDERUNA ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina".
3. ADELAIS ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina". The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontainees records that "comes Rodulfus" (referring to Raoul [II]) was "nepos…ex sorore" of Louis IV King of France. It appears chronologically unlikely for any of King Louis's sisters, whose dates of birth can be estimated to [908/17], to have been the mother of Raoul [II] who was killed in battle in 944, presumably when he was already adult. It appears more likely that the family relationship was one generation further back, and that a member of the Unruochingi family, descended from the sister of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and who originated in the same area in northern France, would provide a good match. Nevertheless, the earlier primary source on which Alberic based his information has not yet been identifified and it is possible that the source is inaccurate in its report. However, the poem Raoul de Cambrai states that "Raoul Taillefer" married "Aalais", sister of King Louis IV which, if correct, would mean that his wife could be identified with Adelais, daughter of Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks by his first marriage. This would mean that Raoul [II] was an infant when his father died. It would also mean that Raoul [I] and his wife were closely related, as the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also implies that Raoul's mother was the daughter of Adelais's paternal great aunt Gisela who married Eberhard, ancestor of the Marchesi of Friulia. The poem Raoul de Cambrai cannot claim to be historically accurate. Nevertheless, it is not impossible that the detail of Raoul's marriage was not fabricated. [m [920/24]) RAOUL [I] Comte de Gouy, son of HUCBERT Comte [d'Ostrevant] & his wife Heilwig [of Friulia] (-926).]
4. GISELA ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina". Her marriage is recorded in the Norman annals for 912, which state that she died without issue, presumably soon after the marriage when Gisla must still have been an infant. The chronicle of Dudo of Saint-Quentin describes her as of "tall stature, most elegant…", which is of course inconsistent with her supposed birth date range. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam suam [=rex Karolus] nomine Gillam" to "Rollo". Settipani considers that the marriage did not occur, and that the Norman sources coconfused it with the marriage of Gisela, daughter of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia, to the Viking leader Gotfrid. m ([912]) as his third wife, ROLLO of Normandy, later known as ROBERT I Comte [de Normandie], son of [RAGNVALD "the Wise" Jarl of Möre in Norway & his wife Ragnhild] ([846]-[928]).
5. ROTRUDE ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina".
6. HILDEGARDE ([908/16]-). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hyrmintrudim, Frederunam, Adelheidim, Gislam, Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex Frederuna regina".
King Charles III & his second wife had one child:
7. LOUIS ([10 Sep 920/10 Sep 921]-Reims 10 Sep 954, bur Reims, Abbaye de Saint-Rémi). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names "Hludovicum" as son of "Karolus rex [ex] Otgivam". He succeeded in 936 as LOUIS IV "d´Outremer" King of the Franks.
King Charles III had illegitimate children by his Mistresses.
8. ARNULF. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, Drogonem, Roriconem et Alpaidem" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex concubina".
9. DROGO. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, Drogonem, Roriconem et Alpaidem" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex concubina".
10. RORICO (-20 Dec 976, bur Laon Saint-Vincent). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, Drogonem, Roriconem et Alpaidem" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex concubina". Elected Bishop of Laon 949.
11. ALPAIS . The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, Drogonem, Roriconem et Alpaidem" as the children of "Karolus rex…ex concubina". The primary source on which her marriage is based has not been identified. m ERLEBOLD Comte de Castres, son of --- (-killed in battle 920). He possessed territories in pagus Lommensis (near Namur), pagus Castricensis (near Mézières), Charpaigne, and probably also the Saulnois (near Metz).”«s87» 
Charles III “The Simple” King of the Franks (I11976)
 
268 “CHARLES, son of LOUIS IV "d'Outremer" King of the Franks & his wife Gerberga of Germany (Laon summer 953-in prison Orléans 12 Jun 991, bur 1001 Maastricht, St Servatius). Twin with his brother Henri. Flodoard records the birth of twins to "Gerberga regina" in 953 "unus Karolus, alter Heinricus, sed Henricus mox post baptismum defunctus est". Flodoard records war between "Karolum regis filium fratrem" and "Godefridum atque Arnulfum, Lotharienses comites" in 975. Banished from the Frankish court after accusing Queen Emma of adultery with Adalbero Bishop of Laon, he sought refuge at the court of Emperor Otto II who created him Duke of Lower Lotharingia in May 977 at Diedenhofen. The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium record that "Karolum ducem, regis Lotharii fratrem" had been granted Lotharingia by Emperor Otto. During Emperor Otto's campaign against his brother King Lothaire, Duke Charles captured Laon in 978 and was proclaimed King of the Franks by Theudebert Bishop of Metz. He claimed the French throne after the death of his brother in 986, and that of his nephew in 987. He captured Laon in [May] 988, and Reims in [Aug/Sep] 989, thanks to his nephew Arnoul Archbishop of Reims. He was captured at LaLaon 30 Mar 991 with his wife and children and taken to Senlis. Richer records that "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote" were imprisoned. From there, they were imprisoned by Hugues Capet King of France at Orléans, where he died. "Otto…rex" donated property "Vvalbisci in comitatu Karoli comitis" to Quedlinburg by charter dated 6 Jan 992. It is assumed that this refers to Charles ex-Duke of Lotharingia as no other Count Charles or Karl has been identified in Germany at the time. If this is correct, the charter demonstrates that Charles was still recognised with a title in Germany after his capture by the French, although this was "comes" rather than "dux". The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "X Kal Jul" of "Karoli ducis". Sigebert records that "Karolus dux" died in 991 and that "Otto filius eius" succeeded in the duchy of Lotharingia.
m ([970]) ADELAIS de Troyes, daughter of [ROBERT Comte de Troyes & his wife Adelais [de Bourgogne]. The Historia Francorum Senonensis refers to the wife of "Karolus" as "filiam Herberti comitis Trecarum". Assuming the birth of the couple's eldest son in 970, this could not refer to Héribert, son of Robert, whose birth is dated to [950]. It is also unlikely to have been Héribert [II] Comte de Vermandois, father of Robert, who was not comte de Troyes. Settipani suggests that the Historia must be in error and that her father was Robert Comte de Troyes. This would not be the only error in this source, as the Historia also refers to "Karolus, frater eius [=Hludovicus], filius Hlotharii regis" when recording his "succession" iin 987. The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis also names "Carolus uxore sua…filia Herberti Comitis Trecarum", presumably based on the same source as the Historia. Her name is recorded by Richer, who states that "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote" were imprisoned by Hugues "Capet" King of France. Orderic Vitalis links the two sets of references by recording that Charles was imprisoned with his wife who was the daughter of Héribert Comte de Troyes. An interesting twist to this apparently straight-forward explanation is provided by another passage in Richer which refers disparagingly to Charles's marriage to "uxorem de mmilitari ordine sibi imparem". It is difficult to imagine this description being appropriate to the Vermandois/Carolingian origin of Charles's known wife. Ferdinand Lot therefore proposed that the text meant that Charles was married twice. If such a second marriage did take place, it must have occurred at the height of the dispute between Charles and his brother King Lothar around [975]. At that time Charles was challenging his brother's authority to rule, and it is difficult to imagine that he would have weakened his own position by contracting an unequal marriage. On the basis of the primary sources so far consulted, it is felt that there is insufficient basis for concluding that Duke Charles married twice. The comment by Richer could presumably be explained by his personal dislike of the Vermandois family.
Duke Charles & his wife had six children:
1. OTTO ([970]-13 Jun [1013/14], bur Maastricht, St Servatius). The Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium names "defuncti ducis Ottonis, filii Karoli". He succeeded his father in 991 as Duke of Lower Lotharingia. Sigebert records that "Karolus dux" died in 991 and that "Otto filius eius" succeeded in the duchy of Lotharingia. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Ottoni duci Lotharingiæ, suo consanguineo [=Henricus imperator]" when recording his opposition to "Metensis episcopus Theodericus secundus" and usurpation of the possessions of the church of Metz (including the abbey of St Trudo) in 1005 during the rebellion of the latter. The same text refers to Otto leaving an only daughter, which suggests that he died soon afterwards, although it is not impossible that the chronicle conflates two distinct events. In any case, conclusions drawn from this passage cannot be definitive as the part of the chronicle in question is incomplete. Some corroboration is found in the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which records the death of "duce Ottone, filio ducis Karoli" in 1005. Sigebert also records the death of "Ottone duce" in 1005, adding that the duchy of Lotharingia was granted to "comiti Godefrido, filio Godefridi Ardennensis". However, it is not possible to treat these passages as conclusive as regards the date of Otto's death. The thrust of both texts is the recording the appointment by the emperor of Godefroi (son of Godefroi Comte de VVerdun) as Duke of Lower Lotharingia "mortuo duce Ottone", an event which is recorded elsewhere as taking place in 1012. The necrology of Liège Saint-Lambert records the death "VII Id Jun" of "Ottonis ducis". [m ---. If it is correct, as shown below, that Otto was the father of a daughter, the name of his wife is not known.] Duke Otto & his wife had one possible child:
a) [daughter . The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that "Ottoni duci Lotharingiæ…" left an only daughter, whom it later identifies as "Hermegardam Namursi cometissam". As shown below, other sources indicate that Ermengarde, wife of Alberert I Comte de Namur, was the daughter of Duke Otto's father. The sources discussed in the document NAMUR indicate that Ermengarde was the mother of at least three of the children of Comte Albert. This would be chronologically impossible if she had been the daughter of Duke Otto.]
2. ERMENGARDE ([970/75]-after 1013). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Karolus dux" was father of "Ermengardem et Gerbergam". The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium, on the other hand, names "Hermegardam Namursi cometissam" as only dadaughter of "Ottoni duci Lotharingiæ", son of Duke Charles. The latter appears chronologically impossible in light of the sources discussed in the document NAMUR which attest Ermengarde as the mother of at least three of her husband's childrenn. The Fundatio Ecclesiæ S Albani Namucensis is less specific on Ermengarde's origin when it names her son "comes Albertus secundus, ortus ex patre Lothariensi" referring to his mother as "matre vero Francigena Ermengarde, nobilissimam Francoruum regum prosapiam trahente". The birth date range of Ermengarde is estimated on the basis of her having been the mother of all Comte Albert's recorded children. Her marriage date is suggested by Richer, who does not name her among the childreen of her father when the family was imprisoned in 991: "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote". This presumably indicates that her marriage predated this imprisonment. It has been suggested that Ermengarde was Albert [I]'s second wife, considering the likely difference in their ages. If this is correct, it is unlikely that there were any surviving children from his earlier marriage as Albert's successor (presumably his eldest son) was the son of his surviving wife, presumably Ermengarde, as shown by the Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium which records that "Rotberdo Namurcensi comite" betrayed Lambert Comte de Louvain after the battle of Hougaerde (dated to 1013) and that Lambert, captured by "Herimannum…comitem", was released after the intervention of "Rotbodi…comitis mater". m (990) ALBERT [I] Comte de Namur, son of ROBERT [I] Comte de Namur & his wife --- (-shortly before 1011).
3. GERBERGA ([975]-27 Jan after 1018, bur Nivelles). The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Karolus dux" was father of "Ermengardem et Gerbergam", and that "Gerberga soror Ermengardis" was mother of "Henricum seniorem de Bursella". The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium names "Gerbergam, filiam Karoli ducis Lotharingie" as wife of "Lambertus filius Reyneri comitis Montensis", specifying that Brabant (including Louvain and Brussels) was her dowry. The Annales Hanoniæ name "Gebeergam filiam Karoli ducis Lotharingie" as wife of "Lambertus…comes Lovaniensis". "Gerberga" is named as wife of "Lantbertum comitem, filium Ragineri Longicolli" in the Gesta of Gembloux Abbey when recording her husband's death, but her origin is not stated. Sigebert's Chronica records in 977 that "Lantbertus" married "Gerbergam filiam Karoli ducis", but this date must be incorrect. Richer records that "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote" were imprisoned. This suggests that Gerberga was not yet married at that date. The birth date of Gerberga is estimated on the basis of the likely birth date ranges of two of her presumed children by Comte Lambert. m (991 or after) LAMBERT [I] Comte de Louvain, son of REGINAR [III] Comte de Hainaut & his wife Adela ([950]-killed in battle Florennes 12 Sep 1015).
4. ADELAIS (-after 1012). Richer records that "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote" were imprisoned.
5. LOUIS (991 or after-after 993). The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the birth of two sons "Hludovicum et Karolum" to "Karolus" while he was in custody in "Aurelianis civitate". After his father was captured, Hugues Capet entrusted hiim to Adalberon Bishop of Laon. Hugues retook him in 993 and imprisoned him at Orléans. Richer records that "Karolum…cum uxore Adelaide et filio Ludovico, et filiabus duabus, quarum altera Gerberga, altera Adelaidis dicebatur, necnon et Arnulfo nepote" were imprisoned.
6. CHARLES (991 or after-after 991). The Historia Francorum Senonensis records the births of two sons "Hludovicum et Karolum" to "Karolus" while he was in custody in "Aurelianis civitate". He escaped from captivity, maybe to his brother Otto, but no further information has been found in the primary sources consulted to shed light on his fate.”«s87» 
Charles Duke of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian] (I14557)
 
269 “CHARLES, son of PEPIN "le Bref" King of the Franks & his wife Bertrada [Berta] "au Grand Pied" (near Aix-la-Chapelle 2 Apr 748-Aix-la-Chapelle 28 Jan 814, bur Aix-la-Chapelle, Chapelle Sainte-Marie). He is named first son of King Pepin & Bertrrada in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin. At the coronation of his father in 754, Charles was also anointed by Pope Stephen III [II]. On the death of his father, he received the larger part of Austrasia, Neustria and western Aquitaine, succeeding as CHARLES I joint King of the Franks, jointly with his brother Carloman, and was crowned 9 Oct 768 at Noyon. He suppressed the revolt of Hunald in Aquitaine in 769, over which he quarrelled with his brother Carloman. On the death of his brother in 771, he set aside the rights of his nephew and became sole king of the Franks. He defended the Pope against the Lombards, conquering their kingdom in 773. He is recorded in charters as having used the title "rex Francorum et Langobardorum" from 5 Jun 774, adding "atque patricius Romanorum" from 16 Jul 774. He accepted the submission of Saxony at Paderborn in 777. During his campaign in Spain in 778, he captured Pamplona, while Zaragoza, Huesca, Barcelona and Girona swore alllegiance to him. He had his sons crowned king of the Lombards and king of the Aquitainians by Pope Adrian I at Rome 15 Apr 781. He incorporated Bavaria and Carinthia into his kingdom in 787, followed by Thuringia, Hessen and Alemannia, by 797. He re-established Pope Leo III after the latter was ambushed by the Romans in 799, and was crowned CHARLES I “Charlemagne” Emperor of the Romans in St Peter's Rome 25 Dec 800, which the Pope justified technically on the basis of an alleged vacancy of the imperial throne, which could not be occupied by a woman, during the reign at Constantinople of Empress Eirene. At the assembly of Thionville 6 Feb 806, Emperor Charles decided the division of territories between his sons. Byzantinine ambassadors from Emperor Mikhael I finally recognised Charlemagne as emperor (although not "Roman Emperor") at Aix-la-Chapelle in 812. After the death of his two older sons, he crowned his son Louis as associate emperor at Aix-la-Chapelle 11 Sep 813. The necrology of Prüm records the death "814 5 Kal Feb" of "Karolus imperator". The Annales Fuldenses record the death "814 V Kal Feb" of "Karolus imperator" at Aachen at the age of about 71.
m firstly (769, repudiated [770/early 771]) --- of the Lombards, daughter of DESIDERIUS King of the Lombards & his wife Ansa ---. Einhard calls King Charles's first wife "filiam Desiderii regis Langobardorum". The Annales Fuldenses record that "Berhta regina" brought "filiam Desiderii regis Langobardorum" back from Italy as the wife for "Karolo filio suo". Her husband sent her back to her father after repudiating her.
m secondly (Aix-la-Chapelle 771 before 30 Apr) HILDEGARD, daughter of GEROLD Graf im Kraichgau [Udalrichinger] & his wife Imma (758-Thionville, Moselle 30 Apr 783[64], bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul). Einhard refers to Hildegard as "de gente Suavorum". Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names her "Hildigardam quæ erat de cognatione Gotefridi ducis Alamannorum" and specifies that she was the daughter of Imma. The Annales Laurissenses record the death "783 pridie Kal MaMai" of "Hildegardis regina" and her burial "iuxta urbem Mettensem in basilica apostolorum et beati Arnulfi". She died from the after effects of childbirth, according to the epitaph of her daughter Hildegard. Paulus Diaconus wrote an epitaph to "Hildegardis regina".
m thirdly (Worms Oct 783) FASTRADA, daughter of RADULF Graf & his wife --- (-Frankfurt-am-Main 10 Oct 794, bur Mainz, St Alban). The Annales Laurissenses record the marriage in 783 at Worms of King Charles and "domne Fastradæ regina". Einhard'd's Annals record the king's marriage in 783 to "filiam Radolfi comitis natione Francam, nomine Fastradam". Fastrada, wife of King Charles, is referred to as "de Orientalium Francorum, Germanorum videlicet" by Einhard. Her cruelty triggered ththe revolt of her husband's illegitimate son Pépin "le Bossu" in 792. The Annales Xantenses record the death in Frankfurt in 794 of "Fastrada regina". Einhard records the death in 794 of "Fastrada regina" at Frankfurt and her burial "Mogontiaci apud sanctum Albanum". Theodulf wrote the epitaph of "Fastradæ reginæ".
m fourthly ([794/autumn 796]) LIUTGARD, daughter of --- (-Tours 4 Jun 800, bur Tours, église Saint-Martin). Einhard names "Liudgardam Alamannam" as King Charles's fourth wife, specifying that she died childless. Angilbert's poem Ad Pippinum Italiæ regum names "Liutgardis" as the wife of King Charles. The Annales Laurissenses Continuatio records the death "II Non Iun 800" at Tours of "domnæ Liutgardæ coniugis" and her burial at Tours.
Mistress (1): HIMILTRUD ---. "Himiltrude nobili puella" is named mother of "Pippinum" in the Gesta Mettensium.
Mistress (2): ---. Einhard refers to "Ruodhaidem" as the daughter of King Charles and an unnamed concubine.
Mistress (3): [MADELGARD] ---. Settipani names Madelgardis as the mistress of King Charles, and mother of Rothildis abbess of Faremoutiers. However, he cites no primary source on which this is based, apart from a reference to an early 9th century list of nuns at Faremoutiers which includes the name. No reference has been found to her in any of the sources so far consulted.
Mistress (4): GERSWINDA ---. Einhard names King Charles's concubine "Gersuindam Saxonici generis", and her daughter Adaltrud.
Mistress (5): REGINA ---. 800. Einhard names King Charles's concubine "Reginam", and her sons "Drogonem et Hugum".
Mistress (6): ADELINDIS ---. 806. Einhard names King Charles's concubine "Adallindem", and her son "Theodricum".
King Charles I & his second wife had nine children:
1. CHARLES ([772/73]-in Bavaria 4 Dec 811). He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' first son. The Chronicon Fontanellense records that Charles I King of the Franks proposesed a marriage between “Offæ Rege Anglorum sive Merciorum…filiam” and “Carolus iunior”, but that King Offa refused unless “Berta filia Caroli Magni” was also married to his son which was unacceptable to the Frankish king. King Charles ordered an embargo on trade imports from England as a result. His father associated Charles in the government of Francia and Saxony in 790. The Annales Laurissenses record that "rex Carolus" installed "primogenitum filium suum Carolum" in "ultra Sequanname…ducatum Cenomannicum" but that this reverted to his father in the summer of the same year. From this time Charles used the title king, and was crowned King of the Franks at Rome 25 Dec 800. Einhard records that "Karolum filium suum [Karoli imperatoris]" invaded "terram Sclavorum…Sorabi" in 806 as far as "super Albium fluvium" and that "Miliduoch Sclavorum dux" was killed during the campaign. At the partition agreed at Thionville in 806, Charles was designated sovereign of Francia (Austrasia and Neustria), northern Burgundy, northern Alemannia, Thuringia, Saxony, Frisia and the Bavarian Nordgau. The Gesta Francorum records the death "811 II Non Dec" of "Karolus filius imperatoris qui maior natu erat". Einhard's Annales also record the death "811 II Non Dec" of "Karlus filius imperatoris qui maior natu erat". The Annales Fuldenses record the death "811 II Non Dec" of "Karolus filius imperator qui maior natu erat".
2.ADELAIS (in Italy [Sep 773/Jun 774]-in Italy [Jul/Aug] 774, bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul). She was born during the siege of Pavia, but died during the return journey to France[102]. "Adelaid" is named daughter of King Charles in the Pauli Gesta, when recording her place of burial. Paulus Diaconus wrote an epitaph to "Adeleidis filia Karoli regis" specifying that she was born in Italy.
3. HROTHRUDIS [Rotrud] ([775]-6 Jun 810). "Hruodrudem et Bertham et Gislam" are named daughters of King Charles & Hildegard by Einhard. Angilbert's poem Ad Pippinum Italiæ regum names (in order) "Chrodthrudis…Berta…Gisla et Theodrada" as daughters of King Charles. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege changes the order slightly when he names "Berta…Chrodtrudh…Gisla …Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king. The betrothal of "Hruodrudem…quæ filiarum eius primogenita" with "CoConstantino, Græcorum imperatore" is recorded by Einhard. Theophanes records that Empress Eirene sent "Costahim sacellarium et Mamalum primicerium" to "Carolum regem Francorum" to arrange the betrothal of "filiam suam…[et] imperatori Constantinino filio suo", in the second year of their joint reign. The Annales Fuldenses record the betrothal of "Hruodtrudis filia regis" and "Constantino imperator" in 787. She was given the name ERYTHRO in Greek. Theophanes records that the betrothaal was terminated in the ninth year of Empress Eirene's reign. Her father kept her and her sisters at court refusing them permission to marry. Her relationship with Rorico [I] is proved by the Annales Bertiniani which record the death "867 V Id Ian" of "Hludowicus abbas monasterii et nepos Karoli imperatoris ex filia maiori natu Rohtrude", read together with an earlier part of the same source in which her son Louis is named "Ludowicum abbatem monasterii Sancti Dyonisii cum fratre ipsius Gauzleno". The Gesta Francorum records the death "810 VIII Id Iun" of "Hruoddrud filia imperatoris quæ natu maior erat". Einhard records the death "VIII Id Iun 810" of "Hruodtrud filia imperatories". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Non Jun" of "Rotrudis filia Karoli imperatoris". Betrothed (781, contract broken 787) to Emperor KONSTANTINOS VI, son of Emperor LEON IV & his wife Eirene (14 Jan 771-Prinkipo Island [15 Aug 797/before 806], bur Constantinople, Monastery of St Euphrosyne). Mistress: ([800]) of RORICO [I], son of GAUZLIN & his wife Adeltrudis --- (-after 1 Mar 839 [840], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maur de Glanfeuil, Anjou). He lived at the court of Charlemagne. Comte de Rennes 819. Comte du Maine [832].
4. CARLOMAN [Pepin] (777-Milan 8 Jul 810, bur Verona, San Zeno Maggiore). "Pippinus" is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' second son. He was baptised "PEPIN" in Rome 15 Apr 781 by Pope Hadrian, Settipani commenting that his name was changed from Carloman but the primary source which identifies him by this name has not so far been identified. Crowned PEPIN I King of Italy 15 Apr 781 at Rome.
5. HLUDOWIC [Louis] (Chasseneuil-du-Poitou {Vienne} [16 Apr/Sep] 778-island in the Rhine near Ingelheim 20 Jun 840, bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul). He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' third son, born a twin with Hlothar. On his father's death, he adopted the title Emperor LOUIS I “der Fromme/le Pieux” 2 Feb 814, crowned at Reims [Jul/Aug] 816 by Pope Stephen IV.
6. HLOTHAR [Lothar] (Chasseneuil-du-Poitou {Vienne} [16 Apr/Sep] 778-[779/780]). He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' fourth son "qui biennis occubuit", born a twin with Hludowic. Paulus Diaconus wrote an epitaph to "Chlodarii pueri regis" naming "Karolus…rex genitorque tuus, genitrix regina…Hildigarda" and specifying that he was a twin.
7. BERTRADA [Berta] ([779/80]-11 Mar, 824 or after). "Hruodrudem et Bertham et Gislam" are named daughters of King Charles & Hildegard by Einhard. Angilbert's poem Ad Pippinum Italiæ regum names (in order) "Chrodthrudis…Berta…Gisla et Theodrada" as daughters of King Charles. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege changes the order slightly when he names "Berta…Chrodtrudh …Gisla…Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king. The Chronicon Fontanellense records that Charles I King oof the Franks proposed a marriage between “Offæ Rege Anglorum sive Merciorum…filiam” and “Carolus iunior”, but that King Offa refused unless “Berta filia Caroli Magni” was also married to his son which was unacceptable to the Frankish king. Her father kept her and her sisters at the court of Aix-la-Chapelle refusing them permission to marry, but she was banished from court by her brother Emperor Louis I on his accession. The Vita Angilberti records the relationship between "Berta fiilia [rex de regina Hildigarda]" and "domnus Angilbertus". The Chronicon Centulensis records that “Angilbertus” married “regis filiam Bertam” and that they had “duos filios Harnidum et Nithardum”. Nithard names Bertha, daughter of King Charles, as his mother. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Id Mar" of "Berta filia Karoli imperatoris qui dedit superiorem Curtem". Mistress: (from [795]) of ANGILBERT "the Saint", son of [NITHARD & his wife Richarda] ([750]-18 Feb 814, bur Saint-Riquier, église du Saint-Sauveur et de Saint-Richard).
8. GISELA (781 before May-after 800, maybe after 814). "Hruodrudem et Bertham et Gislam" are named daughters of King Charles & Hildegard by Einhard. Angilbert's poem Ad Pippinum Italiæ regum names (in order) "Chrodthrudis…Berta…Gisla et Theodrada" as daughters of King Charles. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege changes the order slightly when he names "Berta…Chrodtrudh …Gisla…Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king. The Annales Laurissenses record that "filia eius [Karoli regis] domna Gisla" was baptised by "archiepiscopo…Thoma" in 781. She was baptised in Milan in [May] 781.
9. HILDEGARD (Thionville [Mar/Apr] 783-[1/8] Jun 783, bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul). "Hildigard" is named daughter of King Charles in the Pauli Gesta, when recording her place of burial[141]. Paulus Diaconus wrote an epitaph to "Hildegardis filiæ [Karoli regis]" specifying that she lived 40 days.
King Charles I & his third wife had two children:
10. THEODRADA ([785]-[9 Jan 844/853]). "Theoderadam et Hiltrudem" are named daughters of King Charles & Fastrada by Einhard. Angilbert's poem Ad Pippinum Italiæ regum names (in order) "Chrodthrudis…Berta…Gisla et Theodrada" as daughters of Kinng Charles. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege changes the order slightly when he names "Berta…Chrodtrudh…Gisla…Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king. Named as abbess of Notre-Dame d'Argenteuil, near Paris by her father before 81414, until 828. "Ludowicus…rex" names "Theodrada amita nostra filia…avi nostri" in a charter dated 9 Jan 844 which confirms her life interest in the abbey of Schwarzach-am-Main, donated to the church of Würzburg, previously belonging to "Blutendndæ filiæ Folkberti quondam comitis". Theodrada arranged for the church of Würzburg to recognise her great niece Hildegard, daughter of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks as her successor. This must have taken place before 853, at which date Hildegard was abbess of Zürich.
11. HILTRUD ([787]-after 800, maybe after 814). "Theoderadam et Hiltrudem" are named daughters of King Charles & Fastrada by Einhard. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege names (in order) "Berta…Chrodtrudh…Gisla…Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king. She lived at her father’s court until his death in 814. Wilhelm Kurze appears to have disproved the theory of the alleged marriage of Hiltrud to Eberhard [I] Graf [von Calw], a court official of Emperor Charlemagne. Accordiing to Rösch, Hiltrud was the mistress (between [799/804]) of Richwin Count of Padua, brother of Richbod Bishop of Trier, who was at the court of Emperor Charlemagne between 792 and 814, and was the mother of an illegitimate son by him. He cites no primary source on which this is based and no reference to this has been found in the sources so far consulted. It is possibly based on onomastic speculation from the use of the first name Richbod. Possible illegitimate son:
a) [RICHBOD ([800/805]-killed in battle Angoulême 14 Jun 844). Abbé de Saint-Riquier 840/44. The Annales Bertiniani record that "Richbote abbas…consobrinus regum, nepos…Karoli imperatoris ex filia" was among those killed in 844. It is possible, but not certain, that his mother was Hiltrud, as explained above.]
King Charles I had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
12. PEPIN “le Bossu” ([770]-Abbey of Prüm 811). He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was born before his father married Queen Hildegard. He rebelled against his father in 792, allegedly due to the cruelty of Queen Fastrada, was judged by an assembly at Regensburg and imprisoned in the Abbey of St-Gallen. He was transferred to the Abbey of Prüm in 794.
King Charles I had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (2):
13. CHROTHAIS [Rotaïde] ([784]-after 800, maybe after 814). "Ruodhaidem" is named daughter of King Charles and an unnamed concubine by Einhard. Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum Rege names (in order) "Berta…Chrodtrudh…Gisla…Rothaidh…Hiltrudh, Tetdrada" as daughters of the king.
King Charles I had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (3):
14. ROTHILDIS [Rouhaut] ([784]-24 Mar 852). Abbess at Faremoutiers from before Oct 840. Her parentage is proved by the necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés which records the death "XI Kal Apr" of "Rothildis abbatisse et monache filia regis magni Karoli". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Rotildis abbatissa".
King Charles I had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (4):
15. ADALTRUD . Einhard names "Adaltrud" daughter of King Charles by his concubine "Gersuindam Saxonici generis".
King Charles I had two illegitimate sons by Mistress (5):
16. DROGO [Dreux] (17 Jun 801-drowned Himeriacum, Bourgogne 8 Dec 855, bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul). Einhard names "Drogonem et Hugum" as sons of King Charles by his concubine "Reginam". The Annales Weissemburgenses record the bbirth "802 aut 803 15 Kal Iul" of Drogo. He and his brother Hugues, and their half-brother Thierry, were brought up in the palace of their half-brother Emperor Louis I after their father died, but after the revolt of Bernard King of Italy in 8118 they were forcibly tonsured and "put under free custody into monasteries". Abbé de Luxeuil 820. Emperor Louis installed "Druagoni fratri suo" as Bishop of Metz in 823. The Annales Fuldenses record that "Druogonem archicapellum et Adalbertum comitem" were sent to the east bank of the Rhine in 840. He became Vicar of the Pope in France in Jun 844. He died after falling into the River Oignon in which he was fishing. A list of bishops of Metz records "domnus Drogo archiepiscopus et sacri palate summus capellanus, filius Karoli imperatoris" as 40th bishop, holding the position for 32 years, 5 months and 7 days, his death "VI Id Dec in Burgundia, prædio sancti Petri Mimeriaco" and his burial in "urbem Medimmatricorum…in ecclesia beati Iohannis apostoli".
17. HUGO [Hugues] "l´Abbé" ([802/06]-killed in battle Angoulême 14 Jun 844, bur Abbaye de Charroux). Einhard names "Drogonem et Hugum" as sons of King Charles by his concubine "Reginam". He is named "Hugo venerabilis filius Karoli regis magni" in the Cartulaire of Saint-Bertin. He and his brother Drogo, and their half-brother Thierry, were brought up in the palace of their half-brother Emperor Louis I after their father died, but after the revolt of Bernard King of Italy in 818 they were forcibly tonsured and "put under free custody into monasteries". Monk at Charroux 818. Abbé de Saint-Quentin 822/23, Abbé de Lobbes. Abbé de Saint-Bertin 836. Abbé de Noaillé. Arch-chancellor of Emperor Louis I 834-840. The Vita Hluudowici Imperatoris records that "Hugonem fratrem suum sed et Adalgarium comitem" visited the emperor [in 836]. He joined Charles "le Chauve" in Sep 841 after the battle of Fontenoy, becoming his Arch-chaplain. The Annales Fuldenses record that "Hugo abbas, patruus Karoli et Rihboto abbas, Rhaban quoque signifer" were killed "844 VII Id Jun" in the battle in which "Pippini duces" defeated the army of Charles II "le Chauve" King of the Franks.
King Charles I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (6):
18. THEODERIC [Thierry] (807-after 818). Einhard names "Theodricum" as son of King Charles by his concubine "Adallindem". The birth of "imperatori filius nomine Theodericus" is recorded in 807. He and his half-brothers Drogo and Hugues were brought up in the palace of their half-brother Emperor Louis I after their father died, but after the revolt of Bernard King of Italy in 818 they were forcibly tonsured and "put under free custody into monasteries".”


“In 768, when Charlemagne was 26, he and his brother Carloman inherited the kingdom of the Franks. In 771 Carloman died, and Charlemagne became sole ruler of the kingdom. At that time the Franks were falling back into barbarian ways, neglecting their education and religion. The Saxons of northern Europe were still pagans. In the south, the Roman Catholic church was asserting its power to recover land confiscated by the Lombard kingdom of Italy. Europe was in turmoil.
 
"By the sword and the cross," Charlemagne ... became master of Western Europe. It was falling into decay when Charlemagne became joint king of the Franks in 768. Except in the monasteries, people had all but forgotten education and the arts. Boldly Charlemagne conquered barbarians and kings alike. By restoring the roots of learning and order, he preserved many political rights and revived culture. Charlemagne's grandfather was Charles Martel, the warrior who crushed the Saracens. Charlemagne was the elder son of Bertrade ("Bertha Greatfoot") and Pepin the Short, first "mayor of the palace" to become king of the Franks. Although schools had almost disappeared in the 8th century, historians believe that Bertrade gave young Chararles some education and that he learned to read. His devotion to the church motivated him throughout life. Charlemagne was tall, powerful, and tireless. His secretary, Eginhard, wrote that Charlemagne had fair hair and a "face laughing and merry . . . his appearance was always stately and dignified." He had a ready wit, but could be stern. His tastes were simple and moderate. He delighted in hunting, riding, and swimming. He wore the Frankish dress--linen shirt and breeches, a silk-frringed tunic, hose wrapped with bands, and, in winter, a tight coat of otter or marten skins. Over all these garments "he flung a blue cloak, and he always had a sword girt about him." Charlemagne's character was contradictory. In an age when ththe usual penalty for defeat was death, Charlemagne several times spared the lives of his defeated foes; yet in 782 at Verden, after a Saxon uprising, he ordered 4,500 Saxons beheaded. He compelled the clergy and nobles to reform, but he divorced two of his four wives without any cause. He forced kings and princes to kneel at his feet, yet his mother and his two favorite wives often overruled him in his own household.  

Charlemagne was determined to strengthen his realm and to bring order to Europe. In 772 he launched a 30-year campaign that conquered and Christianized the powerful pagan Saxons in the north. He subdued the Avars, a huge Tatar tribe on the Danube. He compelled the rebellious Bavarian dukes to submit to him.
 
When possible he preferred to settle matters peacefully, however. For example, Charlemagne offered to pay the Lombard king Desiderius for return of lands to the pope, but, when Desiderius refused, Charlemagne seized his kingdom in 773 to 774 and restored the Papal States.
 
The key to Charlemagne's amazing conquests was his ability to organize. During his reign he sent out more than 50 military expeditions. He rode as commander at the head of at least half of them. He moved his armies over wide reaches of country with unbelievable speed, but every move was planned in advance. Before a campaign he told the counts, princes, and bishops throughout his realm how many men they should bring, what arms they were to carry, and even what to load in the supply wagons. These feats of organization and the swift marches later led Napoleon to study his tactics.
 
One of Charlemagne's minor campaigns has become the most famous. In 778 he led his army into Spain, where they laid siege to Saragossa. They failed to take the city, and during their retreat a group of Basques ambushed the rear guard at Roncesvalles and killed "Count Roland." Roland became a great hero of medieval songs and romances.
 
By 800 Charlemagne was the undisputed ruler of Western Europe. His vast realm covered what are now France, Switzerland, Belgium, and the Netherlands. It included half of present-day Italy and Germany, part of Austria, and the Spanish March ("border"). The broad March reached to the Ebro River. By thus establishing a central government over Western Europe, Charlemagne restored much of the unity of the old Roman Empire and paved the way for the development of modern Europe.
 
On Christmas Day in 800, while Charlemagne knelt in prayer in St. Peter's in Rome, Pope Leo III seized a golden crown from the altar and placed it on the bowed head of the king. The throng in the church shouted, "To Charles the August, crowned by God, great and pacific emperor, long life and victory!"
 
Charlemagne is said to have been surprised by the coronation, declaring that he would not have come into the church had he known the pope's plan. However, some historians say the pope would not have dared to act without Charlemagne's knowledge.
 
The coronation was the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire. Though Charlemagne did not use the title, he is considered the first Holy Roman emperor (see Holy Roman Empire). Reform and Renaissance Charlemagne had deep sympathy for the peasants and believed that government should be for the benefit of the governed. When he came to the throne, various local governors, called "counts," had become lax and oppressive. To reform them, he expanded the work of investigators, called missi domininici. He prescribed their duties in documents called capitularies and sent them out in teams of two--a churchman and a noble. They rode to all parts of the realm, inspecting government, administering justice, and reawakening all citizens to their civil and religious duties.
 
Twice a year Charlemagne summoned the chief men of the empire to discuss its affairs. In all problems he was the final arbiter, even in church issues, and he largely unified church and state.
 
Charlemagne was a tireless reformer who tried to improve his people's lot in many ways. He set up money standards to encourage commerce, tried to build a Rhine-Danube canal, and urged better farming methods. He especially worked to spread education and Christianity in every class of people.
 
He revived the Palace School at Aachen, his capital. He set up other schools, opening them to peasant boys as well as nobles.
 
Charlemagne never stopped studying. He brought an English monk, Alcuin, and other scholars to his court. He learned to read Latin and some Greek but apparently did not master writing. At meals, instead of having jesters perform, he listened to men reading from learned works.
 
To revive church music, Charlemagne had monks sent from Rome to train his Frankish singers. To restore some appreciation of art, he brought valuable pieces from Italy. An impressive monument to his religious devotion is the cathedral at Aachen, which he built and where he was buried.
 
At Charlemagne's death in 814 only one of his three sons, Louis, was living. Louis's weak rule brought on the rise of civil wars and revolts. After his death his three quarreling sons split the empire between them by the Partition of Verdun in 843.”«s61», «s87» 
Charlemagne or Charles I King of the Franks (I10654)
 
270 “CHILDERICH (-Tournai [481/82], bur Tournai). Gregory of Tours records that Merovech was the father of Childerich. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Merovechus…filium…Childerico". He succeeded in [451/57] as leader of the Franks in Roman GaGaul, and subsequently adopted the title CHILDERICH I King of the Franks, confirmed by his undated seal which bears the title "Childerici Regiz". Gregory of Tours records that King Childerich's "private life was one long debauch" and that he was forced into exile in Thuringia by his subjects who chose as his replacement the Roman General Ægidius, named magister militum per Gallias in [456/57] and who ruled for 8 years. Gregory of Tours records Childerich's restoration as king in Gaul, followed by his alliance with "Odovacar…[and] his Saxons" (indicating that this is unlikely to refer to the Ostrogoth leader in Italy), and their joint subjugation of the Alamanni. A letter from Remigius Bishop of Reims to Childerich's son Cllovis congratulates the latter on taking over his father's position in "Belgica Secunda", implying that Childerich's authority was limited to the north-east part of Gaul. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Childericus rex" reigned for 24 years. m ([464]) as her second husband, BASINA, formerly wife of BASINUS King of Thuringia, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Basina as wife of Basinus King of Thuringia, with whom King Childerich sought refuge after being deposed, Basina deserting her first husband to join Childerich after he was restored as king in Gaul. The marriage date is estimated on the basis of how long Childerich was allegedly in exile, assuming that the date of his deposition is accurate, and is apappears to be consistent with the estimated dates of birth of the couple's descendants. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Childericus rex" committed adultery with "in Toringam…Basina regina uxorem Bisini regis" who abandoned her husband to join Childerich. Assuming that Basina existed, it is unlikely that her first name is correct considering that it is the feminine form of her first husband's name. King Childerich & his wife had four children:
a) CHLODOVECH [Clovis] ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names Clovis as son of Childerich & Basina[26]. He succeeded his father in [481/82] as CLOVIS I King of the Franks.
b) LANDECHILDIS [Lantilde]. Gregory of Tours names Lanthechild as sister of King Clovis, specifying that she was baptised with him after having followed the Arian faith. She converted to Arianism, according to the title of one of the sermons of Avitus Bishop of Vienne.
c) AUDOFLEDIS . Gregory of Tours names Audofleda as sister of King Clovis, recording that she married Theodoric King of Italy. Iordanes records the marriage of Theodoric and "Lodoin Francorum regem filiam eius Audefledam" and names her brothers "Celdebertum et Heldebertum et Thiudebertum", although this is presumably an incorrect reference to her nephews and great-nephew with similar names. m ([492]) THEODORIC King of the Ostrogoths in Italy, illegitimate son of THEODEMIR King of the Ostrogoths in Pannonia & his concubine Ereleuva --- ([454]-30 Aug 526).
d) ALBOFLEDIS (-after 496). Gregory of Tours names Albofled as sister of King Clovis, specifying that she was baptised but died soon after, St Rémy sending a letter of condolence to her brother. From the context, it would appear that her baptism took place around the same time as her brother was baptised. “Remigius Episcopus” wrote to “Chlodoveo Regi” consoling him on the death of “germana vestra…Albochledis”.”

“His tomb was discovered at Tournai in 1653.”

“Leader of one grup of Salian Franks as the western Empire unraveled to extinction. Operated west of the Rhine as well as in traditional Frankish territories east of the river and, by his death in 482, was in control of the old Roman provice of Belgica II centred on Tournai. Possibly preeminent over other Frankish leaders, but Frankish unification was really achieved by his son...”«s60», «s62», «s87» 
Childerich I King of the Franks (I11056)
 
271 “CHILPERIC (-murdered 486). Gregory of Tours names (in order) "Gundobad, Godegisel, Chilperic and Gundomar" as the four sons of Gundioc King of the Burgunds. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Gundeveus rex Burgundionum…ex genere Athanaric regis" and his four sons "Gundobadus, Godeghiselus, Chilpricus et Godmarus", recording that Gundobad killed his brother Chilperic. He succeeded his father in 473 as CHILPERIC King of Burgundy, at Lyon. He became magister militum in Gaul during the reign of Emperor Glycinius, exercising authority between Lyon and Geneva. m ---. Gregory of Tours records that Chilperic's wife was drowned by her brother-in-law King Gundobad, after he tied a stone around her neck. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records the same event. King Chilperic had four children:
i) son. Murdered. The primary source which established his existence has not so far been identified.
ii) son. Murdered. The primary source which established his existence has not so far been identified.
iii) SEDELEUBE [Chroma] ([481]-). Gregory of Tours names "Chroma" as the elder daughter of Chilperic, records that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, and that Chroma became a nun. The Liber Histororiæ Francorum also records that "filia…senior…Chrona" was sent into exile after her parents were murdered. Fredegar names "Sædeleuba" as the older daughter of Chilperic. Fredegar records that "Sideleuba regina" had founded the church at Genevneva to which the body of St Victor was taken. Presumably this refers to the daughter of Chilperic King of Burgundy as no other reference to this name has been found. However, the text implies that Sedeleube was married to, or was the widow of, a king at the time, no other reference having been identified in Fredegar to an unmarried daughter of a monarch being referred to as "regina". If this is correct, the identity of her husband is not known. [m --- King of ---.]
iv) CHROTECHILDIS [Clotilde] ([480]-Tours, monastery of Saint-Martin 544 or 548, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names "Clotilde" as the younger daughter of Chilperic, recording that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, but that the latter accepted a request for her hand in marriage from Clovis King of the Franks. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that, after the murder of her parents, "filia…iunior…Chrotchilde" was kept in Burgundy where she attracted the attention of Chlodoveo King of the Franks. Fredegar states that Clotilde was driven into exile to Geneva by her uncle, after he allegedly murdered her father, and that King Clovis requested her hand in marriage as a means of controlling Gundobad's power. Gregory of Tours records Clotilde's lack of success in converting her husband to Christianity until the fifteenth year of his reign, when he and his people were baptised by St Rémy Bishop of Reims. Gregory of Tours records that Queen Clotilde became a nun at the church of St Martin at Tours after her husband died. Clotilde was canonised by the Catholic church, her feast day is 3 Jun. m (492) as his second wife, CLOVIS I [Chlodovech] King of the Franks, son of CHILDERIC I King of the Franks & his wife Basina ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]).”«s87» 
Chilperic King of Burgundy (I10871)
 
272 “CHLODOVECH [Clovis], son of CHILDERICH I King of the Franks & his wife Basina --- ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names Clovis as son of Childerich & BBasina. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Childerico" as father of "Chlodovecho rege". He succeeded his father in [481/82] as CLOVIS I King of the Franks. He defeated Syagrius, ruler at Soissons, in 486. The Liber Historiæ Francorum recordds that "Chlodovechus" expanded his kingdom "usque Sequanam" and afterwards "usque Ligere fluvio". He remained a pagan after his marriage to a Catholic wife, but converted to Christianity in [496] allegedly having vowed to do so if successful in a battle against the Alamans. He allied with Godegisel against Gondebaud King of Burgundy in [500]. He defeated and killed Alaric II King of the Visigoths at the campus Vogladensis, probably Voulan, near Poitiers, athough this is popularly known as the battle of Vouillé, in 507. Gregory of Tours records that Clovis took control of the territory of the Sigebert King of the Franks of the Rhine, after persuading Sigeric's son Chloderic to kill his father and then killing Chloderic, as well as the territory of Chararic King of the Salian Franks. Gregory of Tours records the death of King Clovis in Paris "five years after the battle of Vouillé" and his burial in the church of the Holy Apostles, which he and Queen Clotilde had built.
[m firstly] ---, daughter of --- [of the Franks of the Rhine]. According to Gregory of Tours, the mother of Theoderich was one of King Clovis's concubines not his first wife. Settipani suggests that his mother was a Frank from the Rhine region, based on the inheritance of Austrasia by Theoderich and the roots "Theode" and "Ric" in his name, possibly transmitted through his mother from Theodemer and Richomer who were both 4th century Frankish kings. However,
m [secondly] (492) CHROTECHILDIS [Clotilde] of Burgundy, daughter of CHILPERICH King of Burgundy & his wife --- ([480]-Tours, monastery of Saint-Martin 544 or 548, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names "Clotilde" as the younger daughter of Chilperich, recording that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, but that the latter accepted a request for her hand in marriage from Clovis King of the Franks. Fredegar states that she was driven into exile to Geneva by her uncle, after he allegedly murdered her father, and that King Clovis requested her hand in marriage as a means of controlling Gundobad's power. A charter dated 2 OOct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" names "uxoris meæ Chrochildis…patris Chilperici regis Burgundiorum". Gregory of Tours records Clotilde's lack of success in converting her husband to Christianity until the fifteenth year of his reign, when he and his people were baptised by St Rémy Bishop of Reims. Gregory of Tours records that Queen Clotilde became a nun at the church of St Martin at Tours after her husband died, and in a later passage records her death in Tours and burial in Paris next to her husband in the church which she had built. She was canonised by the Catholic church, feast day 3 Jun.
King Clovis & his first [wife/concubine] had one child:
1. THEODERICH ([485]-end 533, bur Metz). Gregory of Tours names Theoderich as son of King Clovis by one of his mistresses, born before his marriage to Clotilde. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chloodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia. In 508, he led his father's campaign against the Visigoths, allied with the Burgundians, and temporarily occupied Aquitaine. He succeeded his father in 511 as THEODERICH I King of the Franks, based at Reims, his territory covering the right bank of the Rhine, the Moselle valley and Champagne, the lands which were later to become the kingdom of Austrasia. He helped Hermanfrid King of the Thuringians defeat the latter's brother Baderic, after being promised half his kingdom, a promise which was not kept. Gregory of Tours records that King Theoderich and his half-brother King Clotaire invaded Thuringia in 531, deposed King Hermanfred (who was later killed) and annexed the kingdom. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Theudericus et Theudobertus filius eius et Chlotharius rex" invaded Thuringia and attacked "Ermenfredum regem Toringorum", a marginal addition recording that "Teodericus filius Clodovei ex concubinana" threw "Ermenfridum regem" from a wall and killed his two sons. Adam of Bremen names "Hadugato" as the duke of the Saxons to whom "Theodericus rex Francorum" sent legates, undated but recorded immediately after the Thuringian invasion of 531. Gregory of Tours records the death of Theoderich in the twenty third year of his reign. m firstly ---. The assumed birth date range of King Theoderich's son, Theodebert, indicates that the king's known wife Suavegotha cannot have been his mother, considering her own estimated birth date, but nothing is known about the king's presumed first wife or concubine. m secondly ([507/16]) SUAVEGOTHA of Burgundy, daughter of SIGISMUND King of Burgundy & his first wife Ostrogotha of the Oststrogoths (495 or later-). Gregory of Tours records that Theoderich King of the Franks married the daughter of Sigismund but does not name her. The primary source which gives her name has not been identified. Gregory does not name Suavegotha's mother, but chronologically it is more probable that she was born from Sigismund's first marriage, which is also suggested by the root "-gotha" in her first name. King Theoderich & his first wife had one child:
a) THEODEBERT ([499/504]-end 547). Gregory of Tours names Theodebert as son of Theoderich, specifying that he was born before the death of his paternal grandfather. His birth date range is estimated on the assumption that he was a young adolesescent when he led the Frankish campaign against the Danes in 515. Gregory of Tours records that his father sent him "with a powerful army" to repel the Danish invasion led by Chlochilaich. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Theudericus et Theudobertus filius eius et Chlotharius rex" invaded Thuringia and attacked "Ermenfredum regem Toringorum". He succeeded his father in 533 as THEODEBERT I King of the Franks at Reims, Gregory of Tours recording that his childless uncle Chiildebert then adopted him as his heir. Gregory records King Theodebert's campaign in northern Italy, which he appears to date to before the death of Queen Wisigardis which is recorded in the following section. Theodebert subjugated Pannonia and threatened to attack Byzantium across the Danube. He was killed while hunting. Gregory of Tours records that he died in the fourteenth year of his reign, and 37 years after the death of his paternal grandfather. The Marii Episcopi Aventicennsis Chronica records the death in 548 of "Theudebertus rex magnus Francorum". m firstly ([end 533/early 534]) as her second husband, DEOTERIA, widow of ---, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours records that Theodebert seduced Deoteria, wife of an inhabitant of Cabrières near Béziers, after his betrothal to Wisigardis, and in a later passage that he married her after the death of his father. According to Gregory of Tours, Theodebert deserted her after being pressured to marry his previous betrothed, but refused to take her back after his second wife died. m secondly (betrothed before 533, 540) WISIGARDIS, daughter of WACCHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides (-[541/42]). Paulus Diaconus names ""Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Wisigarda married "Theodeperto regi Francorum. Gregory of Tours records that Theoderich betrothed his son Theodebert to "Wisigard, a king's daughter" and in a later passage that Theodebert married her "seven years [after he] had become engaged to [her]" after being pressured to desert Deoteria but that Wisigardis "soon died". m thirdly ([542/47]) ---. Gregory of Tours records that Theodebert "married another woman" after his second wife died but gives no details. King Theodebert & his first wife had two children:
i) daughter ([532/33] or before-drowned Verdun ----). Gregory of Tours records that Deoteria bore a daughter to Theodebert, who left mother and child at Clermont-Ferrand when he returned to assert his claim to the throne on learning that his father was dying. In a later passage, he records that she drowned in the river after her mother tipped her over a bridge in Verdun "afraid that the king might desire her and take advantage of her".
ii) THEODEBALD ([534]-555). Gregory of Tours names Theodebald as the son of Theodebert and his wife Deoteria, implying that he was born after his parents' marriage. He succeeded his father in 547 as THEODEBALD I King of the Franks at Reims, under the regency of his aunt Theodechildis. On his death, his territory was taken by his great uncle King Clotaire. Gregory of Tours records that he had a stroke and could not move from the waist down, dying in the seventh year of his reign. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 555 of "Theudebaldus rex Francorum". m ([554]) as her first husband, WALDRADA, daughter of WACCHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha [Austregusa] of the Gepides. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda…secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald". The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum". Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cususupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald". Gregory of Tours names "Vuldetrada" as the wife of King Theodebald. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus". According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria", which does not imply that Clotaire married Waldrada. She [married secondly], her first husband's great-uncle, Clotaire I King of the Franks, and thirdly (after 555) Garibald Duke in Bavaria.
King Theodebert & his [first/second/third] wife had one child:
iii) BERTHOARA (-after 566). The Carmina of Fortunat names "Berthoara…filie digna patri, te, Theudebercthe" when recording that she encouraged the building of the baptistry of the church of Mainz. She is not mentioned by Gregory of Tours, and it is not known who was her mother.
King Theoderich & his second wife had one child:
b THEODECHILDIS [Techilde] ([516/20]-[570/595]). Procopius refers to a sister of King Theodebert who was the wife first of Hermengisel King of the Warnes and secondly of Hermenegisel's son Radegis, the latter eventually sending her back home. Flodoard names "Teudechildi, prefatæ reginæ [=Suavegotta regina] filiæ" recording that her mother allowed her the usufruct of a property which she donated to the church of Reims and later that she made her own testamentary donation to the same church, although it is not certain that this is the same person. Fortunatus wrote an epitaph to “Theodechildis Reginæ”, which indicates presumably that she lived until the late 6th century. She is not mentioned by Gregory of Tours. According to Settipani, she was regent for her nephew King Theodebald I in 547 but he does not cite the source on which this information is based. [A charter dated 2 Oct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" purprports to be written when "filia mea…Theodechildis" was becoming a nun. The editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ Scriptores series assumes that this charter refers to the daughter of King Theoderich. Another charter, also classified as spurious, in the name of "Theodechildis filia Chlodoveo" purports to record a donation to the monastery of St Peter at Sens dated Sep 569.] m firstly ([540]) as his [second] wife, HERMENGISEL King of the Warnes, son of --- (-before 547). m secondly (before 547, repudiated [547/50]) her stepson, RADEGIS of the Warnes, son of HERMENGISEL King of the Warnes & his [first] wife ---. .
King Clovis & his second wife had [six] children:
2. INGOMER (b and d 493). Gregory of Tours names Ingomer as eldest son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, recording that his mother insisted on having him baptised against the wishes of her husband, who considered his early death as a sign of dissatisfaction on the part of the pagan gods.
3. CHLODOMER ([494/95]-killed in battle Vézeronce 21 Jun 524). Gregory of Tours names Chlodomer as second son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia. He succeeded his father in 511 as CHLODOMER King of the Franks, at Orléans, his territory covering the Loire valley from Orléans to Tour, Chartres, Sens and Auxerre. Gregory of Tours records that Chlodomer's moother incited him to attack Burgundy to revenge the death of her parents. He defeated and captured Sigismund King of Burgundy in his first invasion, but was defeated and killed by Sigismund's brother Gondemar during a second invasion. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlodomiris" led an army into Burgundy against "Godmarum", a marginal additional recording that "Gladmirus filius Clodovei regis Francorum" was killed during the course of the attack. m ([514] or 521) as her first husband, GUNTHEUCA [Gondioque], daughter of --- [King of Burgundy]. Gregory of Tours names Guntheuc as widow of King Chlodomer and records her second marriage with his brother Clotaire, but does not give her origin. The Liber Historiæ Fraancorum records that "Chlotharius" married "uxorem fratris sui…Gundeucam". Settipani suggests, for onomastic reasons only, that she may have belonged to the Burgundian royal family which, if correct, means that she must have been the daughter of either King Gondebaud or his brother Godogisel. However, Gregory makes no mention of this in his lengthy description of King Chlodomer's campaigns in Burgundy, an omission which is surprising if his wife was related to his opponents. She married secondly ([524]) as his first wife, Clotaire I [Chlothachar/Lothar] King of the Franks. King Chlodomer & his wife had three children:
a) THEODEBALD ([521]-murdered Paris 531, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Theudovald, Gunthar and Chlodovald as the sons of King Chlodomer, specifying that their paternal grandmother took them into her own household after the death of their father. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "filios…Chlodomire orfanos Theudovaldo, Gunthario et Chlodoaldo" were brought up by "Chrodchildis regina" after their ffather was killed. In a later passage, Gregory records that the two older sons were murdered by their uncle King Clotaire, who suspected that his mother was plotting for their succession to the throne, specifying that the older son was 10 years old.
b) GUNTHAR ([523]-murdered Paris 531, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Theudovald, Gunthar and Chlodovald as the sons of King Chlodomer, specifying that their paternal grandmother took them into her own household after the death of their father. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "filios…Chlodomire orfanos Theudovaldo, Gunthario et Chlodoaldo" were brought up by "Chrodchildis regina" after their father was killed. In a later passage, Gregory records that the two older sons were murdered by their uncle King Clotaire, who suspected that his mother was plotting for their succession to the throne, specifying that the younger son was 7 years old.
c) CHLODOVALD [Cloud] ([524]-7 Sep [560], bur Monastery of Saint-Martin [later Saint-Cloud] near Paris). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Theudovald, Gunthar and Chlodovald as the sons of King Chlodomer, specifying that their paternal grandmother took them into her own household after the death of their father. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "filios…Chlodomire orfanos Theudovaldo, Gunthario et Chlodoaldo" were brought up by "Chrodchildis regina" after their father was killed. In a later passage, Gregory records that Chlodovald escaped the fate of his brothers and entered a religious life. He became a monk at Nogent (now Saint-Cloud), near Paris, where he founded the monastery of Saint-Martin, renamed Saint-Cloud by the 8th century. The Vita Sancti Chlodovaldi records the death of Chlodovald on "VII Id Sep" but does not specify the year. He was canonised as St Cloud, feast day 7 Sep.
4. CHILDEBERT ([497]-23 Dec 558, bur Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés). Gregory of Tours names Childebert as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Chlodomer and before Clotaire. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia. He succeeded his father in 511 as CHILDEBERT I King of the Franks, at Paris, his territory covering the Seine and Somme valleys, as well as the northern coast of France as far as Brittany, Nantes and Angers. Gregory of Tours records that King Childebert attacked and defeated Amalric King of the Visigoths, which marked the end of the Visigothic presence in France and the start of the transfer of their power-b-base to Spain. He and his brother Clotaire launched a third attack on Burgundy, besieged Autun and occupied the whole kingdom, deposing King Gondemar II. Gregory of Tours records that the childless King Childebert adopted his nephew Theodebert as his heir after the death of the latter's father. He founded the monastery in Paris which, from the end 11th century, was called Saint-Germain des Prés. Gregory of Tours records the death of King Childebert in Paris and his burial in the church of St Vincent. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 558 of "Childebertus rex Francorum". m ULTROGOTHA, daughter of --- (-after 561, bur Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés). Gregory of Tours names Ultrogotha as the wife of King Childebert, specifying that she was sent into exile with her two daughters by King Clotaire after her husband died. Childebert I & his wife had two children:
a) CHRODESINDIS (-after [566/67], bur Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés). Gregory of Tours records that Ultrogotha and her two (unnamed) daughters were sent into exile by King Clotaire after her husband died. Settipani cites a spurious charter of Saint-Germain-des-Prés dated 20 Aug 566, "falsified in the 11th century from a lost act of King Clotaire I", which names the two sisters.
b) CHRODOBERGA (-after [566/67]). Gregory of Tours records that Ultrogotha and her two (unnamed) daughters were sent into exile by King Clotaire after her husband died. Settipani cites a spurious charter of Saint-Germain-des-Prés dated 20 Aug 566, "falsified in the 11th century from a lost act of King Clotaire I", which names the two sisters.
5.CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire/Lothar] ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard). Gregory of Tours names Clotaire as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Childebert. He succeeded his father in 511 as CLOTAIRE I King of the Franks, at Soissons.
6. [THEODECHILDIS ([492/501]-576). A charter dated 2 Oct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" purports to be written when "filia mea…Theodechildis" was becoming a nun. As noted above, the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ Scriptores series assumes that this charter refers to the daughter of King Theoderich. Another charter, classified as spurious, in the name of "Theodechildis filia Chlodoveo" purports to record a donation to the monastery of St Peter at Sens dated Sep 569. She founded the monastery of Mauriac in Auvergne. m ---, king.]
7. CHROTHIELDIS [Clotilde] ([502/11]-531, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]). Gregory of Tours refers to the marriage of the (unnamed) sister of the four brothers Theoderich, Chlodomer, Childebert and Clotaire with Amalric King of the Visigoths, arranged after the death of their father, specifying that she was sent to Spain "with a great dowry of expensive jewellery". Gregory names her Clotilde in a later passage in which he records that she was maltreated by her husband, and brought back to France by her brother King Childebert who attacked and defeated King Amalric, but died on the journey and was buried in Paris beside her father. m (511) AMALRIC King of the Visigoths, son of ALARIC II King of the Visigoths & his wife Theodegotha of the Ostrogoths (502-murdered 531).
8. [daughter . The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Agiulfus" as sixth bishop of Metz, stating that "patre ex nobili senatorum familia orto, ex Chlodovei regis Francorum filia procreatus", and that "nepos ipsius…Arnoaldus" succeeded him as bishop. This is the only reference so far identified to this supposed daughter of King Clovis, whose existence should presumably therefore be treated with caution. The reference to her supposed grandson Arnold suggests some confusion with the sources which allege the existence of Bilichildis, possible daughter of King Clotaire I (see below). m ---.] [Two possible children:]
a) [AGIULF (-22 Nov ----). Bishop of Metz. The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Agiulfus" as sixth bishop of Metz, stating that "patre ex nobili senatorum familia orto, ex Chlodovei regis Francorum filia procreatus", and that "nepos ipsius…Arnoaldus" succeeded him as bishop[135]. A list of bishops of Metz records "Aigulfus" as 26th bishop, holding the position for 20 years, and his death "X Kal Dec".]
b) [daughter . m ---.] [One possible child:]
i) [ARNOLD . Bishop of Metz. The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Agiulfus" as sixth bishop of Metz, stating that "patre ex nobili senatorum familia orto, ex Chlodovei regis Francorum filia procreatus", and that "nepos ipsius…Arnoaldus" succeeded him as bishop. A list of bishops of Metz records "Aigulfus" as 27th bishop, holding the position for 8 years and one month, but omits the date of his death.]”


“Ruled the Franks 481-511

Put an end to Roman rule in northern Gaul by defeating Syagrius at Soissons in 486. Conquered the Alamanni in 496 and defeated the Visigoths at Tours.

He converted to Catholicism as opposed to the Arian Christianity common among Germanic peoples, at the instigation of his wife, the Burgundian Clotilde, a Catholic. He was baptized in the Cathedral of Rheims as most future French kings would be. This act was of immense importance in the subsequent history of France and Western Europe in general, for Clovis expanded his dominion over almost all of the old Roman province of Gaul (roughly modern France) which stands at the centre of European affairs. He is considered the founder both of France (which his state closely resembled geographically at his death) and the Merovingian dynasty which ruled the Franks for the next two centuries.”

“King of the Salian Franks (482-511). Created the Frankish kingdom in the aftermath of Roman collapse. At his death, it covered all of what is now France except its Mediterranean coast, together with Belgium and substantial territories east of the Rhine. The new kingdom was created by victories over the remnants of the Roman army of the Rhine, Bretons, Alamanni, Thuringians and Visigoths, and by a process of centralization which saw Clovis eliminate a series of other Frankish warband leaders, uniting their followers in each case to his own.”«s60», «s62», «s87» 
Clovis I (Chlodovech) King of the Franks (I10869)
 
273 “CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire/Lothar], son of CHLODOVECH King of the Franks & his second wife Chrotechildis of Burgundy ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard). Gregory of Tours names Clotaire as son of King Clovivis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Childebert. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia. He succeeded his father in 511 as CLOTAIRE I King of the Franks, at Soissons, his territory covering Soissons, Laon, Noyon, Arras, Cambrai, Tournai and the lower Meuse, the lands which were later to become the kingdom of Neustria. Gregory of Tours records that King Clotaire and his half-brother King Theoderich invaded Thuringia in 531, deposed King Hermanfred and annexed the kingdom, specifying that Clotaire brought his second wife back as part of his booty. He and his brother King Childebert launched a third attack on Burgundy, besieged Autun aand occupied the whole kingdom, deposing King Gondemar II in 534. He invaded Spain, with his brother King Childebert, and besieged Zaragoza but was forced to withdraw. He inherited the territories of his great-nephew King Theodebert in 555 anand those of his brother King Childebert in 558, when he became sole king of the Franks. Gregory of Tours records his death, in the fifty-first year of his reign on the first anniversary of the killing of his son Chramn, at Soissons from a fever caught while hunting in the forest of Cuise and his burial at Soissons Saint Medard. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 561 of "Chlothachrius rex".
m firstly ([524]) as her second husband, his sister-in-law, GUNTHEUCA [Gondioque], widow of CHLODOMER King of the Franks, daughter of --- [King of Burgundy]. Gregory of Tours names Guntheuc as widow of King Chlodomer and records her second marrriage with his brother Clotaire, but does not give her origin[146]. Settipani suggests, for onomastic reasons only, that she may have belonged to the Burgundian royal family which, if correct, means that she must have been the daughter of either King Gondebaud or his brother Godogisel. However, Gregory makes no mention of this in his lengthy description of King Chlodomer's campaigns in Burgundy, an omission which is surprising if his wife was related to his opponents.
m secondly (531, repudiated) RADEGUND of Thuringia [Radégonde], daughter of BERTHECHAR [Bertaire] King of the Thuringians & his wife --- (Erfurt 518-Poitiers 13 Aug 587, bur Poitiers, basilique Sainte-Marie-hors-les-Murs). Gregory of Tours namees Radegund as the orphaned daughter of Berthar. The Vitæ Sanctæ Radegundis names "Radegundis natione barbare de regione Thoringa" and her "avo rege Bessino, patruo Hermenfredo, patre rege Bertechario". In a later passage, Gregory records thatat, after the Frankish invasion of Thuringia, Radegund formed part of the booty taken home by Clotaire I King of the Franks, who later married her. The testament of Radegundis dated to [584/87] survives. Gregory of Tours records the death of St Radegund on 13 Aug. She was canonised, her feast day is 13 Aug.
[m] thirdly ([532]) INGUNDIS [Ingonde], daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Ingund as the wife of King Clotaire and mother of six of his children. She was King Clotaire's concubine from [517].
[m] fourthly ARNEGUNDIS [Aregonde], sister of his third wife Ingonde, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours specifies that King Clotaire's wife Aregonde was the sister of his wife Ingonde, making clear that the marriage was polygamous as he records that Clotaire reported his "marriage" to Aregonde to his wife Ingonde. She is named "Chæregundem" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum.
[m] [fifthly] (555, repudiated) [as her second husband], WALDRADA, widow of THEODEBALD King of the Franks, daughter of WACCHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides. According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria", which does not imply that Clotaire married Waldrada. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus". She married thirdly (after 555) Garibald Duke in Bavaria.
Mistress (1): CHUNSINA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Chunsina as the mistress of King Clotaire, mother of Chramn. She is named "Gunsinam" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum.
Mistress (2): ---. The name of King Clotaire's second mistress is not known.
King Clotaire & his third [wife] had [seven] children:
1. GUNTHAR ([517]-after 532). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Gunthar died in his father's lifetime. It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate. Gregory of Tours reports that he served as an officer in his father's army, but died young.
2. CHILDERICH (-before 561). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Childerich died during his father's lifetime. It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate.
3. CHARIBERT ([520]-Paris end 567, bur [Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés]). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde. It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate. He succeeded his father in 561 as CHARIBERT King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Childebert, with Paris as his capital. ThThe Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561. Herimannus names "Hariberti rex libidini deditus" when recording his marriages. After his death, his kingdom was divided among his brothers. m firstly (repudiated) INGOLBERGA [Ingelberge], daughter of --- ([520]-Tours 589). Gregory of Tours names Ingoberg as the wife of King Charibert, but records that he dismissed her and took Merofled in her place. Herimannus records the repudiation by "Hariberti" of his wife "Ingoberga". She retired to Tours after her repudiation. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Ingoberg, widow of Chharibert, in the fourteenth year of King Childebert's reign, saying he thought that she was in her 70th year, although this age seems exaggerated considering the likely birth date of her daughter. [m] secondly (after 561) MEROFLEDIS, daughter of ---, a wool-worker. Gregory of Tours records that King Charibert fell in love with the two daughters of a wool-worker, Marcovefa and Merofled, and that after Queen Ingoberg humiliated their father by making him prepare wool for the royal housusehold he dismissed the Queen and replaced her by Merofled. [m] thirdly (after 561) THEODECHILDIS, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Theudechild, daughter of the shepherd who looked after King Charibert's flocks, as another of the king's women and that after Charibert died she offered her hand in marriage to King Gontran, who seized most of her goods and packed her off to a nunnery at Arles from which she unsuccessfully tried to escape. [m] fourthly his sister-in-law, MARCOVEFA, sister of MEROFLEDIS, daughter of --- (-before end 567). Gregory of Tours records the marriage of King Charibert and Marcovefa, sister of Merofled, for which they were excommunicated by "Saint Germanus the Bishop", as well as Marcovefa's death soon after before her husband. King Charibert & his first wife had one child:
a) BERTA ([before 560]-[601/before 616], bur Canterbury, Church of St Peter and St Paul). Gregory of Tours records that the daughter of King Charibert and Ingoberg "eventually married a man from Kent and went to live there". Bede records that Æthelberht King of Kent had "a Christian wife of the royal family of the Franks called Bertha". It is reasonable to assume that Berta was born before 560, given the subsequent marital history of her father, who died in 567 having married three times after repudiating his first wife, although it is possible that some if not all of his marriages were polygamous. Kirby suggests that Berta's marriage took place in [580] after analysing the various contradictory chronological indicationns in contemporary sources. According to Bede, King Æthelberht received Bertha "from her parents". As her father died in 567, and her mother in 589, this appears to mean that she married before 567 if taken literally, which seems unlikely. The word "parents" may in this context mean "relatives" more broadly. Already a Christian when she came to England, she was accompanied by Liudhard, a Frankish bishop, although if he attempted to convert her husband his efforts must have been unsuccessful in view of the later conversion of King Æthelberht by St Augustine. Queen Berta is named in Pope Gregory I's letter of 601 to her husband. Bede records the burial of Queen Berta in the same church as her husband. m ([580]) as his first wife, ÆTHELBERHT King of Kent, son of EORMENRIC King of Kent & his wife --- (after [550]-24 Feb 616, bur Canterbury, Church of St Peter and St Paul).
King Charibert & his second [wife] had one child:
b) BERTHEFLEDIS (after 561-after 589). Gregory of Tours names Berthefled as daughter of King Charibert, recording that she lived at the nunnery of St Martin at Tours but left to live at Le Mans (after a visit by Queen Ingiltrude complaining about her daughter Berthegund, which dates the event to 589), and that "she was a woman who ate and slept a lot, and she had no interest at all in the holy offices". The primary source which confirms that she was born from her father´s second [marriage] has not yet been identified.
King Charibert & his third wife had one child:
c) son (b and d after 561). Gregory of Tours refers to the unnamed son of King Charibert and Theudechild who was buried immediately after his birth.
King Charibert & his --- wife had [one child]:
d) [CHROTIELDIS [Clotilde] ([after 561]-after 590). Gregory of Tours records that Clotilde, who "used to pretend that she was Charibert's daughter" (which suggests doubts about the correctness of her assertion), led a revolt in the convent of Sainte-Croix in Poitiers, together with Basina daughter of King Chilperich, against abbess Leubovera. She was excommunicated for involvement in political intrigue, but accepted back at her convent. If Chrotieldis was the daughter of King Charibert, no indication has been found concerning the identity of her mother.]
4. GUNTCHRAMN [Gontran] ([532/34]-28 Mar 592, bur basilique Saint-Marcel, near Chalon-sur-Saône). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde. He succeeded his father in 561 as GONTRAN King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Chlodomer, with Orléans as his capital. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561. He adopted his nephew King Childebert II as his successor in 577, the arrangement being renewed under the treaty of Andelot dated 28 Nov 587. Fredegar records the death of King Guntram "anno 33 regni…V Kal Apr" and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Marcelli" in the monastery which he had built. m firstly ([556]) MARCATRUDIS, daughter of MAGNACHAR Duke of the Transjuranian Franks & his wife --- (-after [556]). Gregory of Tours names Marcatrude, daughter of Magnachar, as the wife of King Gontran, specifying that she poisoned her stepson Gundobald but died soon after her own son. m secondly (56566) AUSTRECHILDIS [Bobilla], daughter of --- ([548]-Sep 580). Gregory of Tours names Austrechild "also called Bobilla" as the second wife of King Gontran. She was a servant in the household of his first wife's father. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Austrechild, specifying that "this wicked woman" requested as a dying wish that the two doctors who had unsuccessfully treated her should have their throats cut. An epitaph to “Austrigildis Reginæ” refers to her as “Regum genetrix et Regia conjunx”. The record of the Council of Valence dated 22 Jun 585 names “Guntramni Regis…bonæ memoriæ iugalis sua Austrechildis regina vel filiæ eorum Deo sacratæ puellæ…bonæ memoriæ Clodeberga vel Clodehildis”. Mistress (1): (before [549]) VENERANDA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Veneranda, servant of one of his subjects, as the mistress of King Gontran before his first marriage. King Gontran & his first wife had one child:
a) son (-after [556]). Gregory of Tours refers to, but does not name, the son of King Gontran and Queen Marcatrudis, specifying that he died soon after the murder of his half-brother Gundobald[196].
King Gontran & his second wife had four children:
b) CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire] ([567]-577 or before). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Clotaire and Chlodomer as the two sons of King Gontran & his second wife but refers to him as having been "left childless" in a later passage which records that he adopted his nephew King Childebert II as his heir. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 577 of "regis atque egregii adolescente Chlothacarius et Chlodomeris filii Gunthegramni regis". An epitaph is written in honour of “Clotharii fratris Chlodomeri”.
c) CHLODOMER (-577 or before). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Lothar and Chlodomer as the two sons of King Gontran & his second wife but refers to him as having been "left childless" in a later passage which records that he adopted his nephew King Childebert II as his heir. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 577 of "regis atque egregii adolescente Chlothacarius et Chlodomeris filii Gunthegramni regis". An epitaph is written in honour of “Chlodomeri filii Guntchramni Regis”.
d) CHLODOBERGA (-before 22 Jun 585). The record of the Council of Valence dated 22 Jun 585 names “Guntramni Regis…bonæ memoriæ iugalis sua Austrechildis regina vel filiæ eorum Deo sacratæ puellæ…bonæ memoriæ Clodeberga vel Clodehildis”.
e) CHROTHIELDIS (-before 22 Jun 585). The record of the Council of Valence dated 22 Jun 585 names “Guntramni Regis…bonæ memoriæ iugalis sua Austrechildis regina vel filiæ eorum Deo sacratæ puellæ…bonæ memoriæ Clodeberga vel Clodehildis”. The treaty of Andelot dated Nov 587, quoted by Gregory of Tours, confirms donations by King Guntram to his daughter Clotilde.
King Gontran had one child by Mistress (1):
f) GUNDOBALD ([549]-after [556]). Gregory of Tours names Gundobad as son of King Gontran and his mistress Veneranda, specifying that his father sent him to Orléans and that he was poisoned by his stepmother Queen Marcatrudis.
5. SIGEBERT ([535]-murdered Vitry [Nov/Dec] 575, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[207]. He succeeded his father in 561 as SIGEBERT I King of the Franks, at Reims, later at Metz.
6. CHLODESINDIS (-before 567). Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Clothsind married Alboin King of the Lombards. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Flutsuinda…filia Flothario regis Francorum" as the first wife of Albuin. The Historia Langobardorum names "Ludusenda…filia Flothari regis" as the first wife of Alboin. Paulus Diaconus names "Chlotharius rex Francorum, Chlotsuindam ei suam filiam" as wife of Alboin[212]. m ([556/60]) as his first wife, ALBOIN King of the Lombards, son of AUDOIN King of the Lombards & his wife --- (-murdered 28 Jun 572). He was crowned King of the Lombards in Italy at Milan in [570].
7. [BILICHILDIS . The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius…rex" had seven children by "Ingunde", the same six as are named in Gregory of Tours with a marginal note adding "Blitchildim" as the seventh child and specifying that she married "Ansbertus nobilissimus" and by him was mother of "Arnoldum". An alternative origin for Bilichildis is provided by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Dagobertum Regem et Blithildem sororem eius” as children of “Lotharius…[et] Beretrudam” (chronologically impossible if she was the grandmother of Arnoul Bishop of Metz), but commenting that “others say” that Bilichildis was the daughter of “primi Lotharii avi istius”, adding that Bilichildis married “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania”. The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names "Hlotharius [rex]…filia…Blithild" and records her marriage to "Ansbertus". The recorded names of the alleged children of Bilichildis do not have a Merovingian ring about them. It is uncertain whether Bilichildis existed at all or whether she and her family were invented for the purposes of compiling a Merovingian descent for the Carolingian dynasty, an enterprise undertaken in Metz from the late 8th century oonwards. Her absence from the list of the children of King Clotaire given by Gregory of Tours certainly suggests that she was a spurious later invention, although Gregory's treatment of the families of the early Merovingians was not exhaustive, as can be seen from the examples of Berthoara, daughter of King Theodebald I, and Theodechildis sister of the same king (see above), whom Gregory does not mention at all. Settipani demonstrates convincingly that there are sufficient indicatioions in other primary sources that parts, if not all, these reconstructions may be based on historical fact. Sifting the fact from the fiction is inevitably speculative. m ANSBERT, son of ---. A 9th century genealogy names "Ansbertus…ex genere senatorum", his brothers "Deotarium, Firminum, Gamardum, Aigulfum episcopum et Ragnifridum" and their supposed descendants, Ansbert's marriage to "filiam Hlotarii regis Francorum…Blithildem" and their children as shown below.]
King Clotaire & his fourth wife had one child:
8. CHILPERICH (before 535-murdered Chelles [27 Sep/9 Oct] 584, bur Paris, Saint-Germain-des-Prés). Gregory of Tours names Chilperich as the son of King Clotaire and his wife Aregund. He succeeded his father in 561 as CHILPERICH I King of the Franks, at Soissons.
King Clotaire had one child by Mistress (1):
9. CHRAMN (-murdered [30 Nov/31 Dec] 560). Gregory of Tours names Chramn as the son of King Clotaire and his concubine Chunsina. Gregory records that Chramn was hated by the townsfolk of Clermont-Ferrand, where he lived, for his dissolute way of life, and in a later passage specifies that he moved on to Poitiers where he conspired against his father. Gregory also says that Chramn allied himself with his uncle King Childebert in Paris, later rebelling once more against his father before fleeing to Brittany, where he and his wife and daughters went into hiding with "Chanao Count of the Bretons" but were captured and murdered. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "Cramnus filius Chlothacharii regis" sought a hiding place from "Childeberto patruo suo" in 555. Paulus Diaconus records that "duce Francorum Chramnichis" laid waste to Trentino after defeating a Lombard invasion of France but was defeated by "Euin Tridentum dux" at "Salurnis". Gregorory of Tours records his father, King Clotaire, died on the first anniversary of the killing of his son Chramn. m CHALDA, daughter of WILLICHAR & his wife --- (-murdered 560). Gregory of Tours records that the wife of Chramn was the daughter oof Willichar, but does not name her. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Willecharii filiam…Chaldam" as the wife of Chramn, adding in a later passage that "Willecharius…socer eius" fled with the family to "basilicam sancti Martini". Gregory of Tours says that Chramn fled to Brittany, where he and his wife and daughters went into hiding with "Chanao Count of the Bretons" but were captured and murdered. Chramn & his wife had --- children:
a) daughters (-murdered 560). Gregory of Tours says that Chramn fled to Brittany, where he and his wife and daughters went into hiding with "Chanao Count of the Bretons" but were captured and murdered. No indication has been found concerning the number or names of Chramn´s daughters.
King Clotaire had one possible child by Mistress (2):
10. [GUNDOBALD "Ballomer" (-murdered Mar 585). Gregory of Tours records that Gundobald claimed to be the son of King Clotaire, who disowned him, that he was brought up by King Childebert and later supported by King Charibert. He was received in Italy by General Narses, married and had sons there before moving to Constantinople. He was invited back to Gaul, landed at Marseille and was welcomed by Bishop Theodore. He was declared king at Brives-la-Gaillarde in Dec 584, but was betrayed and captured at Comminges by Gontran King of Burgundy, who murdered him.] m (in Italy) ---. The name of Gundobald´s wife is not known. Gundobald & his wife had two children:
a) two sons. Gregory of Tours records that the two sons of Chramn were born in Italy, and they were taken to Byzantium by their father after the death of their mother.”


“He inherited the kingdom of Soissons from his father in 511. King of Franks in Soissons, Neustria, Frankish Kingdoms, between 27 November 511 and 558. He acquired Orléans from his brother recently killed in battle against the Burgundians on 25 June 524. King of Franks in Orléans, Frankish Kingdoms, between 25 June 524 and 558. He defeated the Thuringians and took Radegund back to Francia as booty where he married her circa 531. He killed, with his brother Childebert, his nephews, Gunthar and Theodebald, sons of Chlodomer, in 531. He and Childebertus I, rex Francorum, vir inluster engaged in their own civil war, bringing into it their nephew Theodebert before 545 in the forest of Brotonne, Normandy, France. A prayer by theiir mother, St. Chlothild, at the tomb of St. Martin, and besought with tears all night not to permit another fratricide. "Suddenly a frightful tempest arose and dispersed the two armies (that of Chlotaire's pursued by Childebert and Theodebert'ss) which were about to engage in a hand-to-hand struggle; thus, says the chronicler, did the saint answer the prayers of the afflicted mother." He inherited the kingdom of Austrasia from his childless grandnephew, Théobald, in 553. King of Franks in Austrasia, Frankish Kingdoms, between 553 and 558. He acquired the kingdoms of Burgundy and Paris from his brother Childebert in 558.”«s60», «s87» 
Clotaire (Chlothachar, Clotaire, Lothar) King of the Franks (I10778)
 
274 “CONAN de Rennes, son of JUDICAËL [Juhael] Comte de Rennes & his wife Gerberge --- (-killed in battle Conquereil 27 Jun 992). The Chronicle of Nantes names "Conano filio Judicael Berengarii Redonensi comite" when recording that he held a large part of Brittany from Thibaut [II] Comte de Blois and fought with Hoël Comte de Nantes. His parentage is confirmed by the Chronico Sancti Michaelis which records the death of his grandson "Gaufridus Dux Britanniæ filius Conani filii Juhelli Berengarii" in 1008. Comte de Rennes. He succeeded in [970] as CONAN I "le Tort" Duke of Brittany. Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan "crowned himself with a royal diadem", was defeated by his brother-in-law Foulques Comte d'Anjou, and surrendered after his right hand had been cut off. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Conanus Brito…filius Juhelli Berengarii" was killed in battle "V Kal Jul 992" against Foulques Comte d'Anjou. The Chronicle of Nantes reports that he was killed at the battle of Conquereuil, dated "992 V Kal Jul" in the Chronicon britannicum.
m (973) ERMENGARDE d'Anjou, daughter of GEOFFROY I "Grisegonelle" Comte d'Anjou & his first wife Adela de Meaux [Vermandois-Carolingian] (before 965-after 982). Rodulfus Glaber records that Conan married the sister of Foulques of Anjou but does not name her. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.
Mistresses (1) - (x): ---. The names of Duke Conan's mistresses are not known.
Duke Conan I & his wife had five children:
1. GEOFFROY de Bretagne ([980]-20 Nov 1008). His parentage is confirmed by the Chronico Sancti Michaelis which records that "Gaufridus Dux Britanniæ filius Conani filii Juhelli Berengarii" died in 1008 "dum pergeret Romam causa orationis". He succeeded his father in 992 as GEOFFROY I Duke of Brittany.
2. JUDITH de Bretagne (982-16 Jun 1017). Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage at Mont Saint-Michel of Duke Richard and Judith sister of "Geoffroi comte des Bretons". According to Orderic Vitalis, Judith founded the abbey of Bernay, Eure in 1025, but this date is inconsistent with her date of death and her husband's second marriage. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subsccribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Judith…". m (Mont Saint-Michel [1000]) as his first wife, RICHARD II "le Bon/l'Irascible" Comte de Normandie, son of RICHARD I "Sans-Peur" Comte [de Normandie] & his second wife Gunnora (-28 Aug 1027).
3. JUDICAËL (-1037). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1026 which recalls that "Gaufridus, Conani Curvi filius" was killed "apud Concuruz prelium", witnessed by "Judicael et Hurwodius duo fratres ipsius"[107]. Comte de Porhoët.
4. CATUALON . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Abbé de Redon.
5. HURNOD [Urvod] de Bretagne (-after 1026). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 1026 which recalls that "Gaufridus, Conani Curvi filius" was killed "apud Concuruz prelium", witnessed by "Judicael et Hurwodius duo fratres ipsius".
Duke Conan I had four illegitimate children by Mistresses (1) - (x):
6. ALAIN . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
7. JUDICAËL dit Glanderius . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
8. son . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.
9. son . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.”


From Wikipedia:
“Conan I (927 – June 27, 992) was the count of Rennes from 958 and duke of Brittany from 990 to his death. He became ruler of Brittany after a period of civil and political unrest, having first succeeded his father Judicael Berengar, as count of Rennes. Conflicting information has been given for the family's origin, one version making Conan great-grandson of Erispoe, Duke of Brittany.
This was the first Gallo family to ascend the Breton duchy, the line of which is first known from Judicael's father Berenguer, Count of Rennes, born in Bayeux, in what was left of Brittania Nova, the March of Neustria, before the cession to the Norman Rollo (911). They had been vassals of the Franks in the same capacity as Roland, Marcher Lords of Brittany, but not of Britannic origins.
He married Ermengarde, daughter of Geoffrey I of Anjou and Adele of Vermandois and had the following issue:
-Judith (982-1017), married Richard II, Duke of Normandy
-Judicael, count of Porhoet (died 1037)
-Geoffrey, the eventual heir
-Hernod
Conan died in battle against his brother-in-law Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou at the Battle of Conquereuil and is buried in Mont Saint Michel Abbey.”«s87» 
Conan I “Le Tort” Count of Rennes, Duke of Brittany (I10627)
 
275 “conde DIEGO Muñoz, son of [MUNIO Gómez] & his wife --- (-[15 May 951/952]). "Ranimirus rex, Ossorio Munniz, Didacus Munniz, Gisubado Braolioniz, Virmudus Nunniz, Abaiube iben Tepite, Recemirus iben December" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 11 Nov 944. Conde de Saldaña. Until the early 940s he was a supporter of the kings of León, signing in 941 the pact between King Ramiro II and the Caliph. The Cronica de Sampiro records that "Fredenandus Gundissalui et Didacus Munionis" rebelled against King Ramiro II, who captured them and imprisoned them "unum in Legione, alterum in Gordone", dated to [943/44] by Torres. "Ranimiro rex" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 3 Apr 945, witnessed by "Fredenandus Gundesalviz, Didacus Munniz…". "Ranimiro rex" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 3 Apr 945, witnessed by "…Didaco Muniz…". His last documented appearance is as witness to King Ordoño III's donation to the monastery of Sahagún 15 May 951.
m TEGRIDIA, daughter of ---. She is named in her husband's 940 donation to the monastery of San Román de Entrepeñas, which also mentions Munio, Gómez, Elvira and Osorio assumed to be four of their children.
Diego & his wife had [nine] children:
1. MUNIO Díaz (-after 1 Sep 986). He is named in his father's 940 donation. He confirmed King Ordoño III's donation to the monastery of Castañeda in [952], indicating that his father had died by that time. He confirmed the 1 Sep 986 donation of his supposed brother Osorio Díaz to the monastery of Sahagún.
2. GÓMEZ Díaz (-after 5 Dec 986). He is named in his father's 940 donation. Conde de Saldaña from [959]. "Sanctius rex" donated property to the monastery of Sahagún by charter dated 26 Apr 960, confirmed by "Tarasia, Gilvira Ranimiri prolis", signed by "…Gomez Didaci…". "Ranimiro rex et Gelbira reina domna" donated property to the monastery of Sahagún by charter dated 11 May 971, confirmed by "…Gomic Didaci…". He confirmed donations 11 May 976, 16 Jun 977, 1 Sep 986, 27 Nov 986 and 5 Dec 986. Although there appears to be no direct proof that all these relate to the Conde de Saldaña, the documents refer to other individuals who appear to be members of his family, in particular those of 27 Nov 986 (made by his supposed sd sister Guntrodo and brother-in-law Ablavel Godestéiz) and 1 Sep 986 (made by his supposed brother Osorio Díaz). He acquired control over Liébana [971/77]. m (after Jun 970) MUNIADOMNA Fernández, daughter of FERNANDO González Conde de Castilllla & his first wife Sancha Sánchez de Navarra (-before 1015). A charter of Sahagún monastery records that, alter the death of “comes Fredenandus Gundisalviz, Dux Castellæ…filia sua…domna Momodomna comitissa” married “comite Gomez Didaz”. Gómez & his wife had six children:
a) GARCÍA Gómez (-after 1017). Conde 971. He made a donation of his part in Calzadilla de Cueza 15 May 984. He confirmed the 1 Sep 986 donation of his supposed uncle Osorio Díaz of the villa Arcello to the monastery of Sahagún. He succeedeed his father as Conde de Saldaña y Liébana. "Garcia Gomez conde" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 15 May 984. He rebelled against Vermudo II King of León in 988/89. He also supported the rebellion of Gonzalo Vermúdez, his supposed father-in-law married to the sister of Queen Velasquita, and in 993 succeeded in temporarily expelling King Vermudo from León. His relations with León improved with the accession of King Alfonso V and, after the death of al-Mansur, García Gómez was one of the nobles who counter-signed the peace treaty with his son al-Muzzaffar. He incorporated Cea and Grajal into his dominions in 1005 and Ceión in 1007. García rebelled again in 1007, claiming the title Conde de León. m MUNIADOMNA, daughter of [GONZALO Vermúdez & his wife Ildonza Ramírez]. She was the niece of Queen Velasquita of León.
b) VELASCO Gómez (-[1000]). Conde. He confirmed the 1 Sep 986 donation of his supposed uncle Osorio Díaz of the villa Arcello to the monastery of Sahagún, signing after his brother García and before his brother Sancho. It is possible that he was the conde of the family of Beni Gómez who was decapitated at the battle of Cervera in 1000.
c) SANCHO Gómez (-executed Guadalmellato 1009). Conde. He confirmed the 1 Sep 986 donation of his supposed uncle Osorio Díaz of the villa Arcello to the monastery of Sahagún, signing after his brother Velasco and before his brother Munio590. Tenente in Ceión. He was killed with Sanchuelo, son of al-Mansor, with whom Sancho returned to Córdoba after the coup led by Caliph Muhammad. m TODA García de Castilla, daughter of GARCÍA I Fernández Conde de Castilla & his wife Ava --- (-after 1031). She retained Líebana after the death of her husband. Sancho & his wife had one child:
i) ELVIRA Sánchez . m firstly conde don FERNANDO Peláez, son of PELAYO Rodríguez & his wife Gotina Fernández. m secondly her second cousin, FERNANDO Díaz, son of conde DIEGO Fernández.
d) [URRACA (-20 May 1025). "Sancius comes cum coniuge mea Urracha" offered "filiam nostram Tegridiam" to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 12 Feb 1011. The parentage of the wife of Conde Sancho García is not known. Salazaar y Acha suggests that she was the daughter of conde Gómez Díaz de Saldaña & his wife Muniadomna Fernández de Castilla. He bases this especially on the introduction of the name Tegridia into the family of the condes de Castilla, the name of the mother of conde Gómez Díaz. Regent of the county of Castile during the minority of her son. She was regent of the county of Castile during the minority of her son. m ([985/95]) SANCHO García de Castilla, son of GARCÍA I Fernández Conde de Castilla & his wife Ava de Ribagorza ([965]-5 Feb 1017, bur San Salvador de Oña). He succeeded his father in 995 as SANCHO I Conde de Castilla.]
e) SANCHA Gómez (-after 983). m (before Jan 979) RAMIRO III King of León, son of SANCHO I “el Craso” King of León & his wife Teresa Ansúrez ([961]-984).
f) MUNIO Gómez . He confirmed the 1 Sep 986 donation of his supposed uncle Osorio Díaz of the villa Arcello to the monastery of Sahagún590. He confirmed a donation of property “de su madre domna Mamadona” to Santo Toribio de Liébana by charter dated 1015. Conde [1020]. m his second cousin, ELVIRA Fáfilaz, daughter of conde FÁFILA Fernández & his wife Adosinda ---.
3. ELVIRA Díaz ([930] or before-). She is named in her father's 940 donation[1158]. There is no proof that the wife of Fernando Vermúdez was the daughter of Diego Muñoz, but the onomastics are favourable and a marriage between the two equally influential Saldaña and Cea families is to be expected. She confirmed a donation to the monastery of Santa Colomba de Ripa Rubia 5 Jan 975 with her husband, the document also confirmed by their children and their son-in-law Flaín Muñoz. m (before [950]) conde FERNANDO Vermúdez, son of VERMUDO Núñez Conde [de Cea] & his first wife Argilo --- (-after 9 Oct 978).
4. OSORIO Díaz ([930]-after 5 Dec 986). He is named in his father's 940 donation. Conde. He was one of the leading rebels against Vermudo II King of León. He confirmed donations to the monastery of Sahagún 11 May 976, 16 Jun 977, 23 Apr 978, 18 Jan 982, 1 Sep 986, 27 Nov 986 and 5 Dec 986. "Osorio Didaci" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 1 Sep 986, which names "Tegridia genetrix Osorio Didaci…uxor Osorio Didaci dive memorie Sanzie filie Sanctionis et Ildonze…Munnio Didaci abio uxoris Osorio Didaci". 'Osorius Didaz comes' confirmed the 27 Nov 986 donation of his supposed sister Guntrodo and brother-in-law Ablavel Godestéiz602. m SANCHA Sánchez, daughter of conde SANCHO Muñoz & his wife Ildonza Fróilaz (-before 1 Sep 986). King Vermudo II donated property to Celanova by charter dated 1 Sep 996 which names “Froila Gutterriz et uxor eius Flamule” and their successor and child “Ildontie” who left “filiam Santia” who married “Osorius Didaci” who rebelelled against the king and whose property was donated. "Osorio Didaci" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 1 Sep 986, which names "Tegridia genetrix Osorio Didaci…uxor Osorio Didaci dive memorie Sanzie filie Sanctionis et Ildonze…Munnio Didaci abio uxoris Osorio Didaci".
5. FERNANDO Díaz ([940 or after]-after 1017).
6. GUNTRODO Díaz (before 940-after 27 Nov 986). "Ablavel Godestioz et Guntrodo uxor" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 27 Nov 986. m ABLAVEL Godestéiz, son of ---. Ablavel & his wife had one child:
a) ELDOARA . She donated property to the monastery of Sahagún 23 Oct 973, naming her mother Guntroda.
7. [NEPOCIANO Díaz ([940 or after]-after 18 Jan 982). If Nepociano and Gonzalo were the sons of Diego Muñoz they were presumably born after 940 as they are not named in their father's document of that date. Conde. Although there is no proof tthat Nepociano Díaz was the son of conde Diego Muñoz, Nepociano confirmed documents relating to the monastery of Sahagún 11 May 976 and 18 Jan 982, the former also confirmed by his supposed brothers Gómez, Osorio and Fernando Díaz, and the latter by Osorio Díaz. Although there were other possible "Diego" fathers at the time, none appears to have been so well connected as Diego Muñoz, which could also explain Nepociano's high-profile marriage. "Giloira Ranimiri principis filia" donated property to the monastery of Sahagún by charter dated 4 Apr 970, confirmed by "…Nepotianus Didaci, Froila Didaci…". "Ranimirus rex" donated property to Sahagún by charter dated 18 Jan 977, confirmed by "…Nepotianus Didaz…". Nepociano also confirmed the 12 Jul 970 donation of García Fernández Conde de Castilla to the monastery of Arlanza.] m URRACA de León, daughter of SANCHO I "el Craso" King of León & his wife Teresa Ansúrez ([962/66]-after 997). Nepociano & his wife had [one possible son]:
a) [OSORIO --- ]. There is no proof that Osorio, father of Nepociano Osorio, was the son of Nepociano Díaz but the use of this unusual first name Nepociano suggests that there may be a close connection.
i) NEPOCIANO Osórez (-before 1040). There is no proof that Nepociano Osórez was related to Nepociano Díaz, although the unusual first name indicates a connection. Nepociano Osórez was probably the right age to have been the grandson of Nepociiano Díaz. Alférez 1032 to 9 Jun 1037. m as her first husband, MUNIADOMNA Godestéiz, daughter of GODESTEO Díaz & his wife Teresa Muñoz ([1005/15]-). She married secondly ([1040/42]) as his second wife, conde don Munio Alfonso. Nepociano & his wife had one child:
(a) doña TERESA Nepociániz .
8. [FROILA Díaz ([940 or after]-after 4 Apr 970). "Giloira Ranimiri principis filia" donated property to the monastery of Sahagún by charter dated 4 Apr 970, confirmed by "…Nepotianus Didaci, Froila Didaci…".]
9. [GONZALO Díaz ([940 or after]-after 16 Jun 977). Although there is no proof that Gonzalo Díaz was the son of conde Diego Muñoz, Gonzalo confirmed documents relating to the monastery of Sahagún 11 May 976 and 16 Jun 977, both of which were also confirmed by his supposed brothers Gómez, Osorio and Fernando Díaz.]”«s87» 
Diego Muñoz Conde (I14935)
 
276 “CONRAD, son of CONRAD [Welf] Comte de Paris & his wife --- (-876). He helped save Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks after the invasion of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks, and was rewarded by being invested as Comtmte d'Auxerre in 859. He fell into disgrace in 861, and passed into the service of the sons of Emperor Lothaire. He received from King Louis II the territories of Geneva, Lausanne and Sion. Marquis of Transjurania (which later evolved into the kingdom of Burgundy) in Dec 864 after he killed comte Hubert [Bosonide].
m WALDRADA, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms the name of Conrad's wife has not so far been identified.
Marquis Conrad & his wife had [three] children:
1. RUDOLF (-25 Oct 911). Regino names "Ruodolfus filius Chuonradi, nepos Huggonis abbatis" when recording his occupation of the land between "Iurum et Alpes Penninas…at apud sanctum Mauritium". He was proclaimed as RUDOLF I King of Upper Burgundy in Jan 888.
2. ADELAIS (-after 14 Jul 929). She is named as sister of "Rodulfi regis" in the latter's 10 Jun 888 charter, and in her own 14 Jan 929 grant to Cluny. She names "Richardi principis domni mei" in this latter document. After her husband diedd, she retired to a monastery. She transferred the monastery of Roman-Moutier to the monastery of Cluny by charter dated 14 Jul 929. m ([887/88]) RICHARD Comte d'Autun, son of comte BUVINUS [Bouvin] & his wife --- d'Arles (-1 Jan 921, bur Sens, abbaye de Sainte-Colombe). He was later known as RICHARD "le Justicier" Duke of Burgundy.
3. [---. m ---.]
a) [ADELAIS. According to Poupardin, Adelais wife of Louis King [of Provence] was the daughter of Rudolf I King of Upper Burgundy. The potential problem with this hypothesis is the apparently impossible marriage of King Louis with his own niece. The solution would be either that Adelais was the daughter of King Rudolf by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage, or that King Rudolf's known wife Willa was not the daughter of Boson King [of Provence]. The problem is discussed fully bby Settipani. The discussion proceeds on the basis that Adelais was in some way related to King Rudolf, but the precise basis for this speculation does not appear to be clearly stated. The estimated date for this relatively obscure marriage is based on its having taking place during the ex-emperor's period of exile in Vienne, before his recall to Italy, at a time when he would not have been considered a great marriage prospect by more prominent prospective fathers-in-law. "Hludowiccus…imperator augustus" granted property at Tressin, Viennois to "fideli nostro Girardo" at the request of "coniux nostra Adalaida" by charter dated 18 Jan 915. m ([Jun 902/905]) LOUIS "l'Aveugle" King [of Provence], ex-King of Italy, ex-Emperor LOUIS III, son of BOSON King [of Provence] & his second wife Ermengardis [Carolingian] (before 882-Arles 5 Jun 928).”«s87» 
Conrad Marquis of Transjurania (I13343)
 
277 “CONRAD, son of RUDOLF II King of Upper Burgundy & his wife Bertha of Swabia ([922/25]-Vienne 19 Oct 993, bur Vienne, cathédrale Saint-Maurice). He is named "Chuonradus rex filio Rodulfi" in his charter dated 23 Apr 943. He succeeded his father in 937 as CONRAD I "le Pacifique" King of Burgundy.
m firstly ADELA --- ([935/40]-[23 Mar 963/[964]). "Adelane regine" is named in the charter of "Chuonradus rex" dated 23 Mar 963 but is not mentioned in his charter dated 8 Apr 962. This suggests that she may have married after the latter datete, but this would leave insufficient time for the birth of her supposed two children. Her birth date range is estimated based on the estimated birth date range of her daughter Gisela. Her origin is not known but Jackman suggests that Adela was sister of "Konrad Duke of Alsace".
m secondly ([964]) MATHILDE de France, daughter of LOUIS IV "d'Outremer" King of the Franks & his wife Gerberga of Germany (end-943-26/27 Jan [981/992], bur Vienne, cathédrale Saint-Maurice). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage of "rex Francorum Lotharius…sororem suam Mathildem" and "Conradus rex Burgundie". "Mathilde et Alberada" are named as daughters of "Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Mathilde was mother of "Rodulfus rex et Mathildis soror eius". Her brother, Lothaire King of the West Franks, arranged this marriage to strengthen his position in south-eastern France. Her dowry consisted of the counties of Lyon and Vienne.
Mistress (1): ALDIUD, wife of ANSELM, daughter of ---. Her relationship with King Contrad is indicated by the charter dated 19 Aug [1019] of "Burchardus sancta Viennensis archiepiscopus et Udolricus frater meus et advocatus meus" granting property "in pago Genevensi…in villa Marischa…a circio Lemani lacus" made "pro remedio animarum…genitore nostro Anselmo sive pro genetrice nostra Aaklui". Considering her illegitimate son's appointment as archbishop in 978 (see below), it is unlikely that he would have been born later than [960] at the latest, even if he was a youthful appointee (which would not have been unusual). It can therefore be inferred that Aldiud's relationship with King Conrad may have taken place before his marriages. Aldiud and her husband were grandparents of Anselm Bishop of Aosta, Bouchard Archbishop of Vienne and Udalrich, vogt of the church of Vienne. A relationship with the earliest counts of Savoy is also likely, as Rodolfus Glauber describes Burchard, son of Count Humbert "aux Blanches Mains", as nepos of Aldiud's illegitimate son. The most probable connection is that Count Humbert's wife was a legitimate daughter of Anselm and Aldiud.
King Conrad I & his first wife had two children:
1. KUNO (-after 10 Aug 966). "Chuonradus…rex et uxor sua Mattilt regina et filii eius Cuono" signed a charter dated 10 Aug 966.
2. GISELA ([955/60]-21 Jul 1007). Herimannus names "Gisela, Counradi regis Burgundiæ filia" wife of "Heinricus dux Baioariæ" and mother of Emperor Heinrich II. Her birth date range is estimated from her having given birth to her eldest son in [976], which also suggests that she must have been King Conrad's daughter by his first marriage, although no direct proof has so far been found to indicate that this is correct. She was exiled to Merseburg after the trial of her husband in 9778. Many contemporary sources confuse Gisela with her niece of the same name, daughter of her half-sister Gerberga & the latter's second husband. For example, the Chronicle of St Bénigne de Dijon names "sororem regis [Rodulfi Burgundie] Gislam" as wife of "Chonradum" and mother of "tertium Henricum". It is not known why this report is repeated so frequently in other chronicles, for simple chronology demonstrates that it cannot be correct. According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Gisila imperatrix, mater sancti Heinrici imperatoris obit VII Kal Martii". Thietmar records the death of "our king's…mother…Gisela" on 21 Jul and her burial at Regensburg, dated to 1007 from the context. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "21 Jul" of "domna Gisela mater Heinrici imperatoris". The necrology of Magdeburg records the death "21 Jul" of "Gisla filia Chuonradi regis". m (before 972) HEINRICH II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria, son of HEINRICH I Duke of Bavaria [Germany] & his wife Judith of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger] (951-Gandersheim 28 Aug 995, bur Gandersheim Stiftskirche).
King Conrad I & his second wife had four children:
3. MATHILDE . "Rodulfus rex et Mathildis soror eius" are named as children of "Mathilde…filia…Gerberga" by the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that Mathilde was mother of Berta who was mother of "Geroldus Genevensis". The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names (in order) "Rodulphem regem Burgundie, Bertham, Guepam et Mathildam" as children of "Mathildis soror Lotharii regis Francie", specifying that Mathilde was mother of "Arnulphum comitem Flandrensem, Godefridum ducem, Gozelonem ducem, fratres", which has no credibility. m --- [de Genève], son of ---.
4.BERTHE de Bourgogne ([964/965]-16 Jan after 1010). The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names "Berta filia Conradi regis Burgundiæ" as wife of "Odone comite Carnotensium". Richer records that King Robert married "Berta Odonis uxor". Rodulfus Glauber names "Odo natus ex filia Chuonradi regis Austrasiorum, Berta nomine". Pope Gregory V called on King Robert to repudiate his wife in 998 on grounds of consanguinity. The request was repeated in 1001 by the court of Rome, Robert at fiirst refused and the kingdom of France was excommunicated. "Bertæ reginæ, Odonis comitis filii eius…" subscribed the charter dated 1004 under which "Gislebertus prepositus" recorded a donation. The king, in reaction to the 1108 assassination oof his favourite Hugues de Beauvais who had served Queen Berthe, visited Rome in 1008 an unsuccessful attempt to divorce his third wife in order to take back Berthe. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Feb" of "Berta mater Odonis comitis". m firstly ([983/86]) EUDES I Comte de Blois, son of THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois & his wife Luitgardis de Vermandois (-995). m secondly (early 997, divorced Sep 1001) as his second wife, ROBERT II King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).
5. GERBERGA (-7 Jul 1018). Herimannus names "filiam Counradi regis Burgundiæ, Gerbirgam" as wife of "Herimannus dux". The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rodulfum II et sororem suam Gepam matrem imperatricis Gisile" as children of "Conradus rex Burgundie" and his wife Mathilde. Wipo names "Herimannus dux Alamanniæ [et] Kerbirga filia Chuonradi regis de Burgundia" as the parents of "regis coniunx Gisela". "Otto…Romanorum imperator augustus" donated property "in villa Stohchusen in pago Locdorp ac comitatu Herimanni comitis" to Kloster Meschede by charter dated 29 Sep 997 by request of "Gerbirge comitisse". The necrology of Marchtalen records the death "Non Jul" of "Gerbirc ducissa". No direct record of hher first marriage has so far been identified. However, "Otto tercius…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted privileges to Kloster Oedingen founded by "matrona Gerberga…in comitatu Herimanni eius filii" to the monks of the Marienkapelle at Aachen by charter dated 18 May 1000, and Thietmar names "Count Hermann son of Gerberga" when recording his dispute with Dietrich Bishop of Münster in 1016. These two references relate to Hermann [II] Graf von Werl. In addition, "Rodulfus et Bernharnhardus nati in…Werla" are named as brothers of Empress Gisela in the Annalista Saxo, although not specifying that they were her uterine brothers. m firstly HERMANN [I] Graf von Werl, son of [HEINRICH Graf im Lerigau & his wife ---] (-[985/86]). m secondly ([986]) HERMANN [von Schwaben], son of KONRAD Duke of Swabia & his wife Richlint of Germany (-2/3 May 1003). He was installed in 997 as HERMANN II Duke of Swabia.
6. RUDOLF (-5/6 Sep 1032, bur Lausanne Cathedral). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rodulfum II et sororem suam Gepam matrem imperatricis Gisile" as children of "Conradus rex Burgundie" and his wife Mathilde. "Rodulfus rex eet Mathildis soror eius" are named as children of "Mathilde…filia…Gerberga" in the Continuator of Flodoard. He succeeded his father in 993 as RUDOLF III King of Burgundy. Wishing to create a nobility without dynastic aspirations, he created aan ecclesiastical aristocracy, investing the Archbishop of Tarentaise with the county of Tarentaise in 996, the Bishop of Lausanne with the county of Vaud, the Bishop of Sion with the county of Valais in 999, and the Archbishop of Vienne with the county of Vienne in 1023. Herimannus records the death in 1032 of "Roudolfus, ignavus Burgundiæ regulus" and succession of Emperor Konrad II to the kingdom of Burgundy. On his death, he bequeathed the kingdom of Burgundy to Emperor Konrad II, husband of his niece Gisela of Swabia, although this was challenged by another nephew Eudes II Comte de Blois. m firstly (before 12 Jan 994) AGALTRUDIS, daughter of --- (-[21 Mar 1008/18 Feb 1011]). "Rudulfus rex" names "coniugis nostre Agilldrudis" in a charter dated 12 Jan 994. "Rodolfus rex" jointly with "Agiltrude regina coniuge nostra" transferred property by charter dated 6 Jun 1009. "Rodolfus…rex" made a donation "pro redemptione anime…coniugis nostre Agiltrudis" by charter dated 18 Feb 1011. m secondly ([24 Apr/28 Jul] 1011) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE, widow of ROTBALD III Comte de Provence, daughter of --- (-25 or 27 Aug after 1057). "Rodolfus…rex" gave "sponsæ meæ Irmingardi" the town and county of Vienne by charter dated 24 Apr 1011. "Rodolfus…rex" names "Irmingarda regina coniuge nostra" in a charter dated 28 Jul 1011. The Chronicon Hugonis names "Ermengardis" as wife of "Rodulfus rex", specifying that she was childless, but does not give her origin]. "Rodulfus rex" names "Irmingarda coniuge mea" in a charter dated 14 Jan 1029. A possible indication of her origin is provided by the charter of "Ermengart regina" dated 1033 for the soul of "Rodulfi regis" under which she donated land "in pago Genevense" to Cluny, although it is impossible to confirm any relationship with the families of the Counts of Geneva whose earliest attested male progenitor is Gerold Count of Geneva who, if related to Ermengarde, would have belolonged to a subsequent generation. "Ermengardis regina" donated property "…loco sepulture patris mei [et]…in villa Jalzinium" to Saint-André-de-Bas at Vienne "pro redemptione animis senioris mei Radulfi regis" by an undated charter. "Ermengarda vidua regina, uxor quondam Rodulfi regis" made a donation by charter dated 20 Sep 1057. The necrology of Savigny records the death "VIII Kal Sep" of "Ermengardis regina Vienne que dedit Tallueriensem". Mistress (1): ---. The name of King Rudolf's mistress is not known. King Rudolf had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):
a) HUGUES (-31 Aug 1038). The Gesta Episcoponum Lausannensium records the death "II Kal Sep" of "Hugo Lausannnensis episcopus, filius regis Rodulfi", specifying that he was elected Bishop of Lausanne in 1019, held the post for 19 years, and was buried next to his father in Lausanne Cathedral. The Catalogi Abbatum Sancti Eugendi Iurensis names "Rudolfi regis Teutonum et in partibus Galliarum…per Burchardum fratrum suum archiepiscopum et per filium Hugonem Gebennensem episcopus et alium Hugonem Gebennensem episcopum et Rotbertum comitem Gebennensem" with the date 1020.
King Conrad I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):
7. BURCHARD (-22 Jun 1030 or 1031). The Chronicon Hugonis names "Burchardus, Rodulfi regis frater, Conradi ex concubina filius", specifying that he was made Archbishop of Lyon when still a child[197]. He was elected Archbishop of Lyon in 978. "Filii nostri Burcardi archiepiscopi" consented to a grant of "Chuonradus rex" dated 983. Provost of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune in 983.”«s87» 
Conrad I “le Pacifique” King of Upper Burgundy (I13929)
 
278 “CONSTANCE de Normandie (Normandy [1057/1061]-13 Aug 1090, bur Church of St Melans near Rhedon). Listed by Orderic Vitalis after Adelaide and before Adela in his description of the careers of the daughters of King William. Named first in his list of the daughters of King William I by Matthew of Paris. Guillaume de Jumièges names Constance as second daughter, naming her husband "Alain Fergant comte de la petite Bretagne et fils d'Hoel, qui avait succédé à Conan" and specifying that she died childless. The Chronicon Ruyensis Cœnobii records the marriage in 1086 of "Alanus" and "Constantiam filiam Regis Anglorum Guillelmi". The Chronicon Kemperlegiensis records the marriage in 1087 of "Alanus Hoëli Consulis filius" and "Connstantiam Guillelmi Regis Anglorum filiam". The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the marriage in 1088 of "Alanus" and "Constantiam filam Regis Guillelmi Anglorum". Orderic Vitalis records that she was married in Bayeux. William of Malmesbury lists her as second daughter after Cecilia, adding that "she excited the inhabitants [of Brittany] by the severity of her justice to administer a poisonous potion to her". Orderic Vitalis, on the other hand, says that she "did everything in her power to further the welfare of her subjects" and "was deeply grieved when she died". The Chronicon Britannico Alter records the death in 1090 of "Constantia Alani coniux…sine liberis". m (Bayeux [1086/88]) as his first wife, ALAIN IV “Fergant” Duke of Brittany, son of HOËL V Comte de Cornouaille, de Léon et de Nantes & his wife Havise heiress of Brittany (-13 Oct 1119).” Constance of Normandy (I10638)
 
279 “Cornelia Blanche Furbish, the only child of Louis and Cornelia (Clowser) Furbish, was born 19 December 1909 in Boston, Massachusetts, and died there on 25 June 1996.

Cornelia (Connie), after the death of her mother, and the subsequent remarriage of her father lived with her aunt and uncle, Rena and Burton S. Allen and her grandfather Frederick in Medford, Massachusetts.

She worked for 38 years as a Secretary for the Massachusetts Division of Employment Security. When she was forced to retire at age 62, she taught classes in creative writing at Roxbury Community College.

Later she was a secretary at both the Department of Elder Affairs and at the Roxbury Community College.

For several years, she was a representative to the Silver Haired Legislature, an elected group of senior citizens who lobby for senior citizen issues. She was also a delegate to the White House Conference on Aging in 1981.

A prolific poet, she wrote hundreds of short poems during her lifetime. She would write them at the spur of the moment, depending on her mood and the surroundings. Her passion for literature, she once recalled was fueled by her grandfather's habit of reading Shakespeare and Stevenson aloud after dinner. She once recalled that "He started when I was about two, but, I always liked the words, even the sound of the words."”«s34» 
FURBISH, Cornelia Blanche (I7094)
 
280 “CRINAN "the Thane" (-killed in battle 1045). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Abthane of Dule. Lay abbot of Dunkeld. Steward of the Western Isles. Mormaer of Atholl. He was killed fighting Kining Macbeth. The Annals of Ulster record that "Crónán abbot of Dún Caillen" was killed in 1045 in "a battle between the Scots themselves". The Annals of Tigernach record that “Crínan abbot of Dunkeld” was killed in 1045 in “a battle between the men of Scotland on one road”. m ([1000]) BETHOC, daughter of MALCOLM II King of Scotland & his wife ---. Lady of Atholl. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Crinan & his wife had two children:
i) DUNCAN ([1001]-killed in battle either Bothganowan/Pitgaveny, near Elgin, or Burghead 14 Aug 1040, bur Isle of Iona). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which record the death of "Donnchad son of Crínán, king of Scotland" in 1040. He succeeded in 1018 as King of Strathclyde. He succeeded his maternal grandfather in 1034 as DUNCAN I King of Scotland.
ii) MALDRED (-killed in battle [1045]). His parentage is confirmed by Simeon of Durham who records the marriage of "Maldred the son of Crinan". Lord of Allerdale. Regent of Strathclyde 1034/35.”«s87» 
Crinan “The Thane” Mormaer of Atholl (I13496)
 
281 “CYNAN ap Iago (-1060). He was exiled to Ireland. m RAGNHILD of Dublin, daughter of SIHTRIC King of Dublin & his wife ---.”«s87» AP IAGO, Cynan (I13469)
 
282 “CYNFYN ap Gwerstan . King of Powys. m as her second husband, ANGHARAD of Gwynedd, widow of LLYWELYN ap Seisyll King of Gwynedd, daughter of MAREDUDD King of Deheubarth and Gwynedd & his wife ---. Cynfyn & his wife had two children:
i) BLEDDYN ap Cynfyn ([1025]-1075). He succeeded his half-brother in 1063 as BLEDDYN King of Gwynedd and Powys.
ii) RHIWALLON (-1070). King of Powys, appointed by King Edward "the Confessor" after the defeat of Gruffydd.
(a) CYNWRIG . Ruled over Gwynnedd jointly with Trahaearn ap Caradog [1080].
(b) MEILYS (-1081).
(c) GWLADUS . m RHYS ap Tewdwr King of Deheubarth, son of TEWDWR Mawr & his wife --- (-killed in battle near Brecknock Castle [Mar/Apr] 1093).
(d) SIONED . m TUDOR "Walensis" Lord of Whittington.”«s87» 
AP GWERSTAN, Cynfyn King of Powys (I14370)
 
283 “DALMAS [I] de Semur, son of GEOFFROY [I] Seigneur de Semur & his first wife --- de Brioude (-murdered 1048). The genealogy of the Seigneurs de Semur, included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire and dated to [1144], names "Dalmace" as son of "Jaufrois qui eut la fille de Dalmas Vicomte de Briode". His paternity is deduced from the charter of "Gaufredus" dated [1054] which names "patris mei Dalmatii [et] avi Gausfredi" as well as "Tetbaldus comes avunculus ipsorum" (referring to Geoffroy and Dalmas, sons of this Dalmas). He succeeded his father in [1020] as Seigneur de Semur. The Vita S Hugonis records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand.
m ARAMBURGE, daughter of ---. The genealogy of the Seigneurs de Semur, included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire and dated to [1144], names "Aremburge qui fut sœur du comte Tetbauld" as wife of "Dalmace". It is uncertain to whom this refers, but if it is Thibaut Comte de Chalon the entry is an error as he was her husband's brother. A manuscript now lost records "Aremburgis de Vergy" as wife of "Dalmatii…de Sinemuro". "Gaufredus" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for souls of "genitoris mei Dalmatii et genitricis meæ Aremburgis" by charter dated to [1055/80] which refers to "Cluniacensis monasterii ubi domnus Hugo frater meus præest".
Dalmas [I] & his wife had nine children:
1. MATHILDE de Semur . "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius". same person as…? --- de Semur . The origin of the wife of Guichard de Bourbon-Lancy is confirmed by the charter dated to [1098/1109] under which "Dalmacius Borbonensis" (this couple's son) donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire in which he names "avunculus meus domnus Hugo abbas Cluniacensis". Bouchard highlights that she is named as Mathilde only by Jean Richard in his study of the cartulary of Marcigny, not in the actual charters. However, of the four daughters of Dalmas [I], the husbands of Adelaide and "Evella" [Hélie] are known from other sources, although it is not impossible that the wife of Guichard was the daughter named Cécile. m GUICHARD Seigneur de Bourbon-Lancy, son of ---.
2. ADELAIDE de Semur . "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius". "Gaufredus" confirmed the donations of property, including "omnia quæ Adeleidæ sorori meæ" gave "quando maritum accepit", to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire by charter dated to [1055/80]. "Adelaide autrefois espouse de Dalmasse de Chastel" donated property "que dom Geofroy mon frère de Semeur m'a donné" to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire by charter dated [1066?]. m DALMAS de Châtel-Montagne, son of ---.
3. CECILE de Semur . "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius".
4. HELIE ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055). "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius". Her marriage is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand. Her marriage is dated by the charter dated to [1034], subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon. "Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius". "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee……". She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean de Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX reporting the second marriage of Duke Robert. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation. The necrology of Auxerrre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[1395].m ([1033], repudiated [1048]) as his first wife, ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1007]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l’Abbaye, Côte d’Or).
5. GEOFFROY [II] de Semur (-[1070/80], bur Marcigny). The genealogy of the Seigneurs de Semur, included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire and dated to [1144], names "le prince Jaufrois et Hugues abbé de Cluny et plusieurs autres" as children of "Dalmace et Aremburge…". He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Semur.
6. HUGUES de Semur (-1109). The genealogy of the Seigneurs de Semur, included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire and dated to [1144], names "le prince Jaufrois et Hugues abbé de Cluny et plusieurs autres" as children of "Dalmace et Aremburge…". "Hugo noster germanus…Andrea et Dalmatio fratribusque meis" are named in the charter of "Gaufredus" dated [1054]. Abbot of Cluny 1049. "Gaufredus" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for souls of "genitoris mei Dalmatii et genitricis meæ Aremburgis" by charter dated to [1055/80] which refers to "Cluniacensis monasterii ubi domnus Hugo frater meus præest".
7. ANDRE de Semur (-before [1070]). "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmaatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius". "Hugo noster germanus…Andrea et Dalmatio fratribusque meis" are named in the charter of "Gaufredus" dated [1054]. "Jaufrois et mes fils Jaufrois et Hugues Dalmace" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for the souls of "…mes frères André et Dalmace…" by charter dated to [1070].
8. JOCERAN de Semur . "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius".
9. DALMAS de Semur (-before [1070]). "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius". "Gausfredus" names "Dalmacio fratre meo" and "Dalmacii patris mei" in a charter dated 1040. "Gofredus" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for the souls of "genitoris mei Dalmacii ac genitricis meæ Aremburgis" by charter dated to [1060] subscribed by "…Dalmatius frater eius…". "Jaufrois et mes fils Jaufrois et Hugues Dalmace" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-r-Loire for the souls of "…mes frères André et Dalmace…" by charter dated to [1070]. "Dalmatius filius Aremburgis" made a donation to Cluny dated 1073[?]. Seigneur de Montaigu. m ---. The name of Dalmas's wife is not known. Dalmas & his wife had three children:
a) RENAUD de Semur (-[1109]). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Sire de Montagu.
b) HUGUES de Semur (-1136). His biographer states that he was the son of Dalmas Seigneur de Montaigu and nephew of Hugues Abbot of Cluny. Bishop of Auxerre 1115.
c) ERMENGARD de Semur . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. The genealogy of the Seigneurs de Semur, included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire and dated to [1144], names "Ermengarde" as wife of "Gaufrois". "Gaufredus de Sinemuro" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire when becoming a monk "cum uxore mea…Ermengarde et uno filio ac duabus filiabus" by charter dated 1088 before 29 Aug. She retired to Marcigny in 1088 with her husband. m ([1072]) her first cousin, GEOFFROY [III] Seigneur de Semur, son of GEOFFROY [II] Seigneur de Semur & his wife Adelaide [de Guines] ([1045/50]-1123).”«s87» 
Dalmas I Seigneur de Semur (I14466)
 
284 “Dame Elizabeth Lowle of Newbury had her riding suit and muff, silver bodkins and gold rings.” GOODALE, Elizabeth (I328)
 
285 “DAVID, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him sixth of the sons. He was designated Prince of Cumbria in [1107]. "David comes" made donations to the monks of Durham by undated charter which names "frater meus Eadgarus rex", witnessed by "Mathildis Reginæ et Willelmi filii sui", presumably referring to hiis sister Matilda Queen of England which dates the document to before Jun 1118. Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, de iure uxoris. "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk by charter dated to [1120], witnessed by "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…". Inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concern land owned by the church of Glasgow. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland. Having at first supported Empress Matilda's right to succeed her father Henry I King of England, he made peace with King Stephen, agreeing in 1136 to resign his English earldoms to his son Henry. The peace was short-lived, King David being defeated by King Stephen at the battle of the Standard 22 Aug 1138. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "David rex Scotiæ".
m (1113) as her second husband, MATILDA [Maud] of Huntingdon, widow of SIMON de St Lis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon. Guillaume de Jumièges records that the eldest of the three daughters of Waltheof & his wife married "Simon de Senlis" and later "David frère de la seconde Mathilde reine des Anglais". Her parents are named by Orderic Vitalis. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevvi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk. "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow.
King David & his wife had four children:
1. MALCOLM ([1114]-[1116/17]). His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was the first-born child but does not name him, and says that he was "cruelly murdered by the iron fingers of a certain wretched clerk" when aged two. The primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified.
2. HENRY ([1115]-12 Jun 1152, bur Kelso Abbey, Roxburghshire). Robert of Torigny names "filium Henricum duasque filias Clariciam et Hodiernam" as children of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" & his wife. He succeeded as Earl of Huntingdon in [Feb 1136], on his father's resignation of the earldom. He was created Earl of Northumberland in 1139.
3. CLARICIA (-young). Her parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis. Robert of Torigny names "filium Henricum duasque filias Clariciam et Hodiernam" as children of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" & his wife.
4. HODIERNA (-young). Her parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis138. Robert of Torigny names "filium Henricum duasque filias Clariciam et Hodiernam" as children of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" & his wife.” 
David I King of Scotland (I12605)
 
286 “Den første som åtte og budde i det udelte Rue som vi kjenner namnet på, var 1615. Asgrim Person Seim -Rue f ca. 1560, avretta 1625.
Kona hans vart som enkje gift oppatt med Øystein Bjørnson. Etter skatteliste 1615 hadde Asgrim 12 løbbol i Rue (då ein gard) og 8 løbbol i Seim, åtte dessutan og Holshagen. Han betalte siste gongen skatten for Seim 1617-19. I 1620 betalte han landskatten for Rue og i åra 1620-24 bygningsskatten til Akershus festning for denne garden, i 1621 og skatt for ei kvern i Rue. Versonen til Asgrim, Per Nilson Kleppo, betalte skatten for Seim i 1622 og broren Ola Person for 1625; Ola åtte Seim, ugift (sjå Seim).
Kilder:
Folk og fortid i Hol Bind III side 276.
Skolelærer Sørbøen skreiv i 1727: " I 1625 skeede et mord i Hoels Annex ". Der budde en ungkar på Seim, og han hadde en gammel bror, som den tida budde i Rue, med navnet Asgrim. Asgrim leigde en " løs Compan " til å slå bror sin ihjel, og to aav sønnene hans i Rue var med. Asgrim ville også sette ild på gården etter at de hadde tatt verdiene til den drepte, men en av sønnene hindra det og sa: " Det er nu ilde nok gjort ". For disse orda berga han livet. Men de tre andre blei dømt til å miste sine liv. Etterpå ble likene satt på steile på et høgt ber sør for Seim. Kona gifta seg opp igjen med en Øystein Bjørnsen.”«s50» 
PERSEN SEIM RUE, Asgrim (I9860)
 
287 “Det bor en Guttorm på Larsgård i 1528.”«s45» LARSGÅRD, Guttorm (I10553)
 
288 “DIARMAIT (-Fermanagh 1 May 1171). King of Leinster. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Diermit rex filius Murcath" was expelled from Ireland by his people and went to the English king, recording in later passages that he returned to Ireland and built "castellum Carrec iuxta Wisefordiam" in 1170, and died in 1172. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that Henry II King of England arrived in Ireland in 1171, went to Dublin where he received “the kingship of Leinster and of the men of Meath, Brefne, Oriel and Ulster”. The Expugnatio Hibernica records the death "apud Fernas circa kal Mai" of "Dermitius Murchardi filius" [in 1171]. m [MOR, daughter of ---]. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Mistress: (1152) DERBFORGAILL, wife of TIERNAN O'Rourke King of Breifny, daughter of MURCHAD O'Malaghlin King of Meath & his wife ---. The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Dermitius…Murchardi filius Langeniensium princeps" eloped with "Ororicio…Medensium rege…uxor ipsius Omachlachelini filia" [in 1152]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Diarmait Mac Murchada king of Leinster forcibly carried off out of Meath the wife of Húa Ruairc…Derb-forgaill daughter of Murchad with her wealth” in 1152, adding in a later passage that she “came again to Húa Ruairc by flight from Leinster” in 1153. Diarmait & his wife had two children:
i) AOIFE [Eva] (-after 1189). The Annales Cambriæ record that "Ricardus comes de Striguil" invaded Ireland in 1171 and married "filiam Diermit regis". The Expugnatio Hibernica records the marriage of "filia…Dermitii, Eva" and Earl Richard. She was styled Countess of Ireland in 1185, but Countess of Strigoil in 1186. m (Waterford [26 Aug 1171]) RICHARD de Clare "Strongbow" Earl of Pembroke, son of GILBERT de Clare "Strongbow" Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Beaumont ([1130]-Dublin 20 Apr 1176, bur Dublin, Holy Trinity). In [1168] he promised Dermot King of Leinster to help him recover his kingdom in return for the hand of his daughter and eventual succession to the crown. He landed near Waterford 23 Aug 1170, and marched to Dublin. He acceded to the demand of King Henry II to surrender his Irish conquests to him and was granted Leinster in fee.
ii) URLACHAN . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m DONOUGH [Donald] More King of Thormond, son of TADHG King of Thomond & his wife --- (-1194).
Dermot had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:
iii) ENNA (-1168 or after). The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Ossiriæ princeps Duvenaldus" [Dounchad [Donough] Lord of Ossory] blinded "Dermitio…filium eiusdem primogenitum". The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Enna Mac Murchada crownprince of Leinster” was blinded in 1168 by “Donnchad Mac Gilla Pátraic king of Ossory”.
iv) CONNOR (-1170). The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Dermitio" gave "filium suum Chuchurum" as hostage to Roderic of Connaught [in 1169]. The Expugnatio Hibernica records that Roderic killed Dermot's son [in 1170].
v) DOMNALL Caemanach (-killed 1175). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1175 of "Domnall Caemanach son of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha king of Leinster…[slain]”.”

From Wikipedia (07/04/2016):
"Diarmait Mac Murchada (Modern Irish: Diarmaid Mac Murchadha), anglicised as Dermot MacMurrough or Dermod MacMurrough (c. 1110 – c. 1 May 1171), was a King of Leinster in Ireland. In 1167, he was deprived of his kingdom by the High King of Ireland – Ruaidri Ua Conchobair. The grounds for the dispossession were that Mac Murchada had, in 1152, abducted Derbforgaill, the wife of the King of Breifne, Tiernan O'Rourke (Irish: Tighearnán Ua Ruairc). To recover his kingdom, Mac Murchada solicited help from King Henry II of England. In return, Mac Murchada pledged an oath of allegiance to Henry, who sent troops in support. As a further thanks for his reinstatement, Mac Murchada's daughter Aoife was married to Richard de Clare, the 2nd Earl of Pembroke (nicknamed "Strongbow"). Henry II then mounted a larger second invasion in 1171 to ensure his control over Strongbow, resulting in the Lordship of Ireland. Mac Murchada was later known as Diarmait na nGall (Irish for "Diarmait of the Foreigners").

Mac Murchada was born around 1110, a son of Donnchad mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Dublin. His father's grandmother Dervorgilla (Derbforgaill) was a daughter of Donnchad, King of Munster and therefore she was a granddaughter of Brian Boru.[1] His father was killed in battle in 1115 by his cousin Sigtrygg Silkbeard, king of the Dublin Vikings, and was buried by them in Dublin along with the body of a dog, considered to be a huge insult.

Mac Murchada had two wives (as allowed under the Brehon Laws), the first of whom, Sadb Ní Faeláin, was mother of a daughter named Órlaith who married Domnall Mór, King of Munster. His second wife, Mór Ní Tuathail, was mother of Aoife / Eva of Leinster and his youngest son Conchobar Mac Murchada. He also had two other sons, Domhnall Caomhánach mac Murchada and Énna Cennselach mac Murchada (blinded 1169). Diarmait Mac Murchada is buried in the Cathedral graveyard of Ferns village.[2]

After the death of his older brother, Énna Mac Murchada, Diarmait unexpectedly became King of Leinster. This was opposed by the then High King of Ireland, Toirdelbach Ua Conchobair who feared (rightly) that Mac Murchada would become a rival. Toirdelbach sent one of his allied Kings, the belligerent Tigernán Ua Ruairc (Tiernan O'Rourke) to conquer Leinster and oust the young Mac Murchada. Ua Ruairc went on a brutal campaign slaughtering the livestock of Leinster and thereby trying to starve the province's residents. Mac Murchada was ousted from his throne, but was able to regain it with the help of Leinster clans in 1132. Afterwards followed two decades of an uneasy peace between Ua Conchobair and Diarmait. In 1152 he even assisted the High King to raid the land of Ua Ruairc who had by then become a renegade.

Mac Murchada also is said to have abducted Ua Ruairc's wife Derbforgaill (English: Dervorgilla) along with all her furniture and goods, with the aid of Derbforgaill's brother, a future pretender to the kingship of Meath. Other sources[who?] say that Derbforgaill was not an unwilling prisoner and that she remained in Ferns with Mac Murchada in comfort for a number of years. Her advanced age indicates that she may have been a refugee or a hostage. Whatever the reality, the abduction was given as a further reason for enmity between the two kings." 
Diarmait Mac Murchada King of Leinster (I15759)
 
289 “DIARMAIT, son of MAEL na mBó & his wife --- (-killed in battle Odba 7 Feb 1072). The Annals of Tigernach record that “Ruaidri son of Tadg son of Lorcan” was blinded in 1036 by “Mael na mbó” (which must indicate the latter´s son assuming that tthe death date of Mail na mBó is correctly recorded above). The Annals of Tigernach record that “Diarmait son of Mael na mbó king of the Húi Cennselaig” plundered “Colomb cille´s Maein (Moone), Dísert Diarmata and my Senóc´s Mugna and Clonmorere” in 1040. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Echmarcach son of Ragnall king of the Foreigners went oversea” in 1052 and “the son of Mael na mbó assumed the kingship after him”, adding in a later passage that “the son of Mael na mbó took the kingship of Dublin by force” in 1053. King of Leinster. High King of Ireland. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Harold Godwinsson and his brother Leofwine, sons of Godwin Earl of Wessex, sought refuge with him in 1051 following the famamily's disgrace. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Diarmait son of Mail na mbó, king of Britons and the Hebrides and Dublin and Mug Nuadat´s Half [southern Ireland]” was killed in 1072 by “Conchobar Húa Mael-Sechlainn in the battle of Odba”. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1072 of "Diarmait son of Mael na mBó king of Laigin and the foreigners…7 Feb” killed in battle by “Conchobar ua Mael Sechlainn king of Temair”.
m DERBORGAILL, daughter of ---, granddaughter of BRIAN Boru King of Ireland (-Imlech 1080). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1080 of "Derbhforgaill daughter of Brian´s son, wife of Diarmait son of Mael na mBó…in Imlech”.
Diarmait & his wife had three children:
1. MURCHAD (-Dublin 1070, bur Dublin).
2. ENNA (-killed 1092). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which name "Diarmait son of Enna son of Diarmait king of Laigin”. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Enna son of Diarmait and the nobles of Desmumu” successfully held the fortress of “Port Láirge” in 1088 against “the Laigin and the son of Domnall Remar”. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Muirchertach Ui Briain” imprisoned “Énna son of Diarmait” in 1089. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1092 of "Enna son of Diarmait…slain by the Uí Cheinnselaig”. m ---. The name of Enna´s wife is not known. Enna & his wife had one child:
a) DIARMUIT (-killed Cell Dara 1098). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1098 of "Diarmait son of Enna son of Diarmait king of Laigin, killed by the sons of Murchad son of Diarmait…in the middle of Cell Dara”.
3. --- “Glún Iairn” (-killed in battle 1070). The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 1070 of "Glún Iairn son of Diarmiat son of Mael na mBó…slain by Cartach´s son and the Gailenga and by the north of Ireland”.”

From Wikipedia (07/04/2016):
"Diarmait mac Máel na mBó (died 7 February 1072) was King of Leinster, as well as High King of Ireland (with opposition). He was one of the most important and significant kings in Ireland in the pre-Norman era. His influence extended beyond the island of Ireland into the Hebrides, the Isle of Man, Wales, and even into England.
Background

Diarmait belonged to the Uí Cheinnselaig, a kin group of south-east Leinster centred on Ferns. His father, Donnchad mac Diarmata, became known more commonly by the epithet Máel na mBó ("Baldy of the Cattle"), whence Diarmait's patronym. The last of Diarmait's ancestors to have been counted as king of all Leinster, Crimthann mac Énnai, died in the late 5th century; but Diarmait's more immediate forebears, most recently his great-grandfather Domnall mac Cellaig (died 974), had been counted among the kings of the Uí Cheinnselaig. Diarmait's mother was Aife, daughter of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, king of Osraige. He had at least one sibling, a brother named Domnall whose son Donnchad mac Domnaill Remair later became king of Leinster.

The Uí Cheinnselaig had been prominent in earlier times, but their power had been broken at the battle of Áth Senaig in 738. The rival Uí Dúnlainge, based in northern Leinster around Naas and Kildare, who also enjoyed the support of the powerful Clann Cholmáin kings of Mide, dominated Leinster until the time of Brian Bóruma. The decline of Clann Cholmáin, and the defeat inflicted on the Uí Dúnlainge, led by Máel Mórda mac Murchada, at the battle of Clontarf in 1014, changed the political landscape to favour the Uí Cheinnselaig once more.

The return of the Vikings to Ireland in the early 10th century occasioned the development of new towns on the coasts. The towns, centres of trade and manufacture, would give significant political power to those who could control their wealth. Kings of Leinster found themselves in a particularly advantageous position to exploit this new wealth as three of the five principal towns lay in or near Leinster. In Leinster proper, in the south-eastern corner dominated by the Uí Cheinnselaig, lay Wexford. To the west of this, in the smaller kingdom of Osraige, which had been attached to Leinster since the late 10th century, was Waterford. Finally, the most important Viking town in Ireland, Dublin, lay at the north-eastern edge of Leinster. Compared to this, kings in the north and west of Ireland had easy access to no towns, while those in the south, in Munster, had access to two: Cork on the south coast and Limerick on the west coast.
Biography

He made an alliance with Niall mac Eochada, king of Ulaid, which helped to put pressure both from the north and south on the kingdoms of Mide, Brega and Dublin — ruled by the High King.

In 1042 he was able to claim the title "King of Leinster" and install his son, Murchad, as King of Dublin. Thus ruler of two of the most powerful and wealthy towns on the island, he was able to make a bid for the High-Kingship. It was during a battle against the king of Mide, Conchobar Ua Maelsechalinn, that he was killed, near to Navan. County Meath, on 7 February 1072.

The surviving sons of King Harold Godwinson of England escaped to Leinster after the Battle of Hastings in 1066 where they were hosted by Diarmait. In 1068 and 1069 Diarmait lent them the fleet of Dublin for their attempted invasions of England.

He is also famous as the ancestor of Diarmait MacMurrough.
Diarmait's Death in the Annals of the Four Masters

"Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, King of Leinster, of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and of Leath-Mogha-Nuadhat, was slain and beheaded in the battle of Odhbha, on Tuesday, the seventh of the Ides of February, the battle having been gained over him by Conchobhar O'Maeleachlainn, King of Meath. There were also slain many hundreds of the foreigners and Leinstermen, along with Diarmaid, in that battle. In it was killed Gillaphadraig O'Fearghaile, lord of the Fortuatha, &c. Of the death of Diarmaid was said:"

Two, seven times ten above one thousand,
From the birth of Christ is reckoned,
To this year, in which Diarmaid,
First man in Leinster, fell.
Diarmaid, of the ruddy-coloured aspect,
A king who maintained the standard of war,
Whose death brought scarcity of peace,
The loss of the heroes of Ladhrann, with their ships.
Comely youths were cut down there,
Together with the head of Claire and Cualann.
It caused in the breeze an unpleasant noise,
The loss of the King of Riada of great valour.
Until at Muillenn-Chul was slain
A brave chieftain of a strong fortress,
Until the furious fire-brand fell by treachery,
They found no hero who dared with him contend.
It is a red wound through my firm heart;
For the host from Caindruim it was not just
To destroy our noble chief they had no right,
It has quenched their spirit greatly,
Diarmaid of the laughing teeth under violent sorrow;
There is not on account of his death banquet or feast;
There will not be peace, there will not be armistice." 
Diarmait mac Máel na mBó King of Leinster, High King of Ireland (I15764)
 
290 “DIRK ([920/30]-Egmond 6 May 988, bur Egmond). The Annales Egmundani name "Theodericus secundus comes filius Theoderici primi". The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that "Theodricus…secundus Hollandie comes" was the only son of "Theodricus primus Hollandie comes" & his wife. His birth date range is calculated from his own estimated marriage date and the estimated dates of birth of his descendants. He succeeded his father as DIRK II Count of Holland, although the date is not knknown. "Theoderici comitis" subscribed charters dated 5 May [951/963], 29 Jul [955/64], 18 Oct 962, 28 Mar 967, 13 Apr 969 and 31 Jan 972. According to Nicholas, after the death of Arnoul I Count of Flanders in 964, Count Dirk occupied Gent and Waas, taking advantage of the weakness of the government of the county of Flanders during the minority of Count Arnoul II. However, this may be speculation based on an interpretation of the charter dated "DCCC[C]LXVIII[I] Id Apr…regnante domno Loth[ario] anno XV", under which "Loth[arius]…rex" granted property "forestum Was[el]a" to "nostro fideli…Theoderico comiti" at the request of "coniunx nostra Hemma regina". As explained above, it is likely that this charter is spurious. Egbert Archbishop of Trier donated property "de beneficio Luthardi comitis…mortuo sine herede" to St Paul at Trier by charter dated 981, subscribed by "Theoderici comitis…". "Otto…rex" recognised the rights in property "in comitatibus Masalant, Kiinhem, Texla" of "fideli nostro Theoderico comiti" by charter dated 25 Aug 985. This refers to the area now known as the Hook of Holland, where Rotterdam was later built, as far north as Gouda, Kennermerland near Haarlem, and the island of Texel in the north of Holland. "Theodrici comitis, Arnulfi comitis…" subscribed a charter dated 1 Apr 988. The Annales Egmundani record the death in 988 of "Theodericus II comes". The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "988 II Non Maii" of "domino Theodricus secundus comes Hollandie" and his burial at Egmond monastery. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "988 pridie Non Mai" of "Theodericus 2 comes". m ([945/50]) HILDEGARD, daughter of --- (before 933-10 Apr 990, bur Egmond). "Theodericus comes et uxor sua Hildegardis" are named in a charter dated Oct [967/79]. "Theoderici et Hildegardis" subscribed a charter dated 30 Sep 975, before "Arnulfi filii eorum [Theoderici et Hildegardis]". The Annales Egmundani name "Hildegardis comitissa" as wife of "Theodericus comes secundus [Hollandensium]" but do not give her origin. "Theodericus…Holtlandensis comes…Florentii filius" recites the ownership history of properties claimed by the church of Utreecht in Holland, including the further construction of the church by "Theodericus secundus, predicti filius, cum Hildegarda coniuge sua", by spurious charter dated 26 Jul 1083, probably written in [1130]. According to Rösch, she was Hildegard dde Flandre, daughter of Arnoul I Count of Flanders, but he cites no primary source on which this is based. Her naming her two sons Arnulf and Egbert suggests that the affiliation may be correct. Boer & Cordfunke refer to a 938 meeting, betweeeen Count Dirk I, Count Meginhard of Hamaland, and Count Arnulf I of Flanders and his wife Adela, to arrange the betrothals of Hildegard of Flanders and Count Dirk II (son of Count Dirk I), and of her sister Liutgard and Wichmann of Hamaland (son of Count Meginhard). The meeting is alleged to be recorded in the Verbrüderungsbuch der Abtei Reichenau, but no trace of this has been found in the copy consulted. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Hildegard was the daughter of Count Arnnoul & his wife Adela de Vermandois and born in [934]. However, from a chronologically point of view it is more likely that Hildegard was born from an earlier unknown marriage of Count Arnoul, as explained in the document FLANDERS, assuming thahat she was Count Arnoul's daughter. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records that Count Dirk II married "Hildegardim (ut creditor) filiam Ludovici regis Francie". This is chronologically impossible, assuming that the birth date of Arnoul Count of Holland is correctly estimated as shown below, as Hildegard daughter of Louis III King of France would have been too old for the marriage and any daughter of Louis IV King of France would have been too young. It is also unlikely that the wife of Count Dirk II was Hildegard, daughter of Charles III "le Simple" King of France, whose birth date is estimated to [908/12]. There therefore seems no possibility that the Chronologia could even be partially correct in assigning this possible Carolingian French origin to Dirk's wife, although it is curious how this origin came to be included in the source. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "III Id Apr" of "Hildegardis…sua conthoralis" and her burial at Egmond monastery. Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "IV Id Apr" of "Hildegardis uxor [Theoderici 2 comitis] filia Ludovici regis Francie". Europäische Stammtafeln shows 990 as her year of death, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. Count Dirk II & his wife had three children:
a) ARNULF ([Gent] [950/55]-killed in battle Winkel, West-Friesland 18 Sep 993, bur Egmond).
b) EGBERT (-8/9 Dec 993). "Theodericus comes et uxor sua Hildegardis" and "Hecberto et Arnulfo filiis ipsius Theoderici" are named in a charter dated Oct [967/79]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Arnulfum comitem, Egbertum TTreverensem archiepiscopum ac Arlindam puellam" as the children of Count Dirk II & his wife. The Vita Sancti Adalberti Egmondani name "Theoderici iunioris filius Egbertus Trevirensis post archiepisco